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What Are Moonshine Jugs Called?

Traditionally, stoneware jugs, also referred to as liquor crocks or jugs, whiskey jugs, and shoulder jugs, were used to store moonshine. They are quality-made and durable stoneware that are very easy to clean. You can safely drink and store water, soda, fruit juice, fermented tea, or liquor in these old whiskey jugs.

What are all the different names for moonshine?

  • Moonshine is known by many nicknames in English, including white liquor, white lightning, mountain dew, choop, hooch, homebrew, shiney, white whiskey, and mash liquor.

Contents

What are alcohol jugs called?

A growler (US) (/ˈɡraʊlər/) is a glass, ceramic, or stainless steel bottle (or jug) used to transport draft beer. They are commonly sold at breweries and brewpubs as a means to sell take-out craft beer.

What are old moonshine jugs?

These old whisky jugs do not contain lead or harmful chemicals. Ceramic jugs are easy to clean quality-made durable stoneware. You can safely store and drink liquor, fermented tea, fruit juice, soda, or water in these old whiskey jugs, or use them as a rustic decoration.

How do you drink moonshine out of a jug?

“How to drink Moonshine”. If you watch the movies, you put jug on your arm, centered over your elbow and then raise the jug up until the shine flows out the spout. If you’re drinking with the “good ole boys”, you just pour it in a quart fruit jar and drink it straight.

Can you drink the heads of moonshine?

These contain the most volatile alcohols and should not be ingested, as they contain methanol and other undesirables. Commercial distillers always discard the foreshots and never consume them.

How big is a squealer?

Squealers, the smaller sibling of the growler, is 950 – 1000ml, or almost 3 stubbies worth of beer.

Why is a jug called a growler?

Beginning as early as the late 1800s, tin pails, pitchers, glass jars or jugs, or other vessels were used to carry beer home from the local pub. These “growlers” supposedly got their name because as the beer sloshed around, it caused the carbon dioxide to escape and created a growling noise.

How can you tell how old a moonshine jug is?

Most bottle manufacturers molded the year into the glass at the bottom of the bottle in 2-digit format. You’ll often find it in the lower right portion when looking at the bottom (some dates are much easier to distinguish than others). This will usually tell you– within a year or two –when the whiskey was bottled.

How much do old crocks sell for?

Collectively, antique stoneware crock values range from $500 to $400,000. However, actual antique crock selling prices depend on whether the crock has the iconic cobalt blue design.

Are old whiskey bottles worth anything?

Old and rare doesn’ t mean something is very valuable. The value is determined by what others are willing to pay for it and what you can collect for it. Whiskey doesn’t age or improve in the bottle like wine does. Whiskey that was bottled decades ago will still taste similar to the day it was bottled.

Why was moonshine made illegal?

So why is moonshine still illegal? Because the liquor is worth more to the government than beer or wine. Uncle Sam takes an excise tax of $2.14 for each 750-milliliter bottle of 80-proof spirits, compared with 21 cents for a bottle of wine (of 14 percent alcohol or less) and 5 cents for a can of beer.

How drunk does moonshine get you?

9. Moonshine: 0-100 Real Quick Drunk. You will be fine one second, then, very shortly after drinking, you’ll be HAMMERED. You’ll feel yourself soaring above the legal limit as you begin to move less like a sober person and more like a marionette controlled by the jerky-handed puppet master known as moonshine.

Does moonshine go bad?

Although different sources will say different things, the answer for whether moonshine can go bad or not is clear – a bottle of unflavored moonshine, much like other plain spirits, has an indefinite shelf life.

How can you tell if moonshine is poisonous?

How to Test for Purity. Folklore tells us one way to test the purity of moonshine is to pour some in a metal spoon and set it on fire. 6 If it burns with a blue flame it is safe, but if it burns with a yellow or red flame, it contains lead, prompting the old saying, “Lead burns red and makes you dead.”

Why does my moonshine taste like water?

The first bit of alcohol to come out of the distillation process is going to smell and taste like solvent because it’s full of methanol and contaminants.

Why does moonshine make you blind?

If you’re drinking moonshine, yes. Today the most common cause of blindness from drinking is methanol. Methanol, otherwise known as methyl alcohol or wood alcohol, can damage the optic nerve and even kill you in high concentrations.

What Does the XXX on Moonshine Jugs Mean?

The XXXon moonshine jars are a traditional emblem of prohibition. When it comes to contemporary depictions of the moonshiner, it has been caricatured and cartooned several times. Anyone who has ever seen a jug with the letters “XXX” inscribed on it knows that it contains moonshine, but what exactly does that symbol imply and why did moonshiners scrawl it on their jugs is beyond me. The number “XXX” indicates how many times the moonshine batch had been ran through the still before it was finished.

Moonshiners employed a basic pot still in the olden days, before the introduction of more contemporary distilling processes like as thump kegs and reflux stills, which were the most basic of all sorts of stills.

Despite the fact that it is a highly successful gadget, you will not obtain pure alcohol when you put a batch through it for the first time.

When you put a mash through a pot still, the product that comes out the other end includes around 30-40 percent alcohol, with the remainder consisting primarily of water.

  • To increase the amount of alcohol in the mixture, you must first collect all of the results from your first runs and then run everything through the still a second time.
  • The moonshine that had been ran through the still three times was extremely near to being pure alcohol, with an alcohol content of more than 80 percent.
  • As a result of the above, I have never seen a historic example of a jug with three X’s inscribed on it before.
  • In the event that any readers come across an example of an ancient moonshine jug that still has the XXXs visible, I would be delighted to view it, and we could even share your photographs on our website.
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Moonshine Jugs – Old Whiskey Jugs

One of the most iconic symbols is the XXXon moonshine jug. Throughout modern depictions of the moonshiner, it has been caricatured and cartooned a number of occasions. Anyone who has ever seen a jug with the letters “XXX” inscribed on it knows that it contains moonshine, but what exactly does that symbol imply and why did moonshiners scrawl it on their jugs is unclear. There are a total of xxxxx number of times that moonshine batch has been passed through the still. This signified that it had been ran through three times and that the shine was made entirely of pure alcoholic beverages.

  • An alcohol distillation system is composed of two parts: a boiler that cooks the mashing and a condenser that collects and cools the evaporated alcohol back to a liquid.
  • However, it is an effective device.
  • When you put a mash through a pot still, the product that comes out the other end includes around 30-40 percent alcohol, with the remainder being primarily of water (the remainder being a mixture of both).
  • The first run generates whiskey that is roughly 60-80 proof and palatable, while the second run creates liquor that is not drinkable because it still has a significant amount of bad tastes that were carried over from the mash.
  • During the second run, the ABV is increased to between 60 and 70 percent.
  • Because it had been put through the still three times, the three XXXs written on the front of the moonshine jug showed that it had a high concentration of alcohol that was practically pure.
  • Since moonshiners transitioned to half gallon mason jars many years ago, any such jugs would have to be extremely ancient.

In the event that any readers come across an example of an ancient moonshine jug that still has the XXXs visible, I would be delighted to view it, and we could even share your photographs on our website as well.

Stoneware Crock Jug

Skip to the main content A glazed stoneware crock jug is available for purchase at Crazy Crow Trading Post for use in the house or when camping. The earliest documented usage of stoneware jugs in the United States, and specifically on the western frontier, goes back to the end of the eighteenth century, when manufacture of the vessels began in the Eastern United States.

Stoneware Jugs: aka Liquor Crocks, Whiskey JugsShoulder Jugs

These traditional drinking vessels, also known as liquor crocks or jugs, whiskey jugs, and shoulder jugs, predate the mason jars and other contemporary containers that have since taken their place. While they were definitely not used only for the consumption of “spirits,” the image of a mountain man, pioneer, or other early frontier resident taking a drink from a stoneware shoulder jug is unquestionably an American cliché, if not a symbol of the American West.

From Pack Mule or Steamer to Tin or Jug

Ten-gallon wooden kegs of alcohol were routinely used to transport alcohol to the highlands. An empty ten-gallon keg and its contents would have weighed around one hundred and fifty pounds, if not more. One or two of these kegs would have been approximately the maximum amount of weight that a pack mule or horse could carry comfortably. For the lengthy journey to the highlands, glass bottles or ceramic jugs were too frail and sensitive to withstand the elements. Following its arrival at its destination, the alcohol was sold in considerably lesser quantities, with the buyer being required to furnish a tin cup, jug, or kettle to store the alcohol he or she had purchased before.

Alcohol and the Fur Trade

Ten-gallon wooden kegs of alcoholic beverages were regularly used for transporting liquor to the highlands. With its contents in tow, the weight of a ten-gallon keg would have been around one hundred pounds. One or two of these kegs would have been approximately the maximum amount of weight that a pack mule or horse could bear. They were too frail and delicate to make the lengthy journey to the highlands in glass bottles or pottery jugs. It was common for the alcohol sold in lesser quantities when it arrived at its destination; it was generally the customer’s obligation to provide an appropriate container for the alcohol purchased.

A Jug Christens a Lake

In addition to its traditional usage for personal use, alcohol during the Fur Trade Era appears to have been employed for more ceremonial purposes. In Sublette County, Wyoming, a marker on the summit of a hill on the road to Fremont Lake commemorates Captain William Drummond Stewart of Scotland, who camped on the edge of this magnificent sheet of water many times between 1833 and 1844 with Jim Bridger and other Mountain Men as well as the Indians. “Captain William Drummond Stewart of Scotland camped on the edge of this magnificent sheet of water from 1833 to 1844.” His artist, Alfred Jacob Miller, created the first drawings of this location in 1837, while he was still a young man.

The jug of whiskey was used to commemorate Stewart’s last journey. Several years later, this glacier-formed lake with a length of twenty-two miles and a depth of more than six hundred feet was named for John C. Fremont — the map creators were unaware that it had already been named years earlier.”

What is American Stoneware?

When you hear the word “American Stoneware,” you’re thinking of the major houseware of nineteenth-century North America—stoneware pottery that’s generally coated in a salt glaze and often painted with cobalt oxide to generate vibrant blue designs. The name “crocks” is frequently used to describe this style of pottery in the vernacular, despite the fact that the term “crock” does not appear in any historical sources describing the ware. While other varieties of stoneware were manufactured in America at the same time as this particular style of pottery—for example, ironstone, yellowware, and other types of china—in general usage, the phrase “American Stoneware” refers to this particular type of pottery.

The pottery is transformed into stone, in essence.

At a temperature of slightly more than 900°C, the salt (sodium chloride) vaporizes and forms a link with the clay body.

An extremely frequent method used on American Stoneware vessels is cobalt decorating, which involves painting unfired vessels with a dark gray mixture of clay, water, and the pricey mineral cobalt oxide, which is a combination of clay, water, and cobalt oxide.

Salt-Glazed Stoneware Productcion Begins in America

Even though salt-glazed stoneware is said to have originated in the Rhineland region of Germany around the year 1400, it became the dominant houseware in the United States of America about the year 1780-1890. It was around the year 1720 that Americans began creating salt-glazed stoneware in cities such as Philadelphia and Yorktown, Virginia. By the 1770s, the craft of salt-glazed stoneware manufacture had expanded to a number of locations throughout the United States, with Manhattan, New York, being the most prominent.

Even though salt-glazing is the most common glaze technique used on American Stoneware, the potters also used a variety of other glaze techniques on their creations.

Albany Slip was also occasionally used as a glaze to coat the interior surface of salt-glazed ceramics, which was known as “salt glazing.”

Decorating American Stoneware

However, while ornamented pottery was typically embellished with cobalt oxide, American Stoneware potters employed a variety of other creative methods. It was by the use of a stylus to carve a design of blossoming plants, birds, or other ornamentation into the leather-hard clay that intricate, recessed pictures on the vessels were made, which were then highlighted with cobalt. It was also possible to imprint patterns into the leather-hard clay by stamping or coggling them into the surface of the clay.

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Stoneware featuring detailed figural designs like as deer, dogs, birds, homes, people, historical scenes, and other whimsical themes such as elephants and “bathing beauties” began to be produced in the latter part of the nineteenth century by potters in New England and New York state.

Many pieces may be traced back to certain producers based on the cobalt ornamentation, clay body, shape, and other characteristics.

While American Stoneware was admired for its durability and aesthetic appeal, it was also seen as a safer alternative to the lead-glazed earthenware pottery manufactured in America before and during its production in the United States.

In many cases, the potters that made American Stoneware also made this earthenware, which is now generally known to as “American Redware.”

Early American Stoneware: 18th Century Tupperware

Stoneware was utilized for anything that we would use glass jars or tupperware for today, including food storage. It was used to store anything from water, soda, and beer to meat, grain, jelly, and pickled vegetables, and it was available in a plethora of different shapes and sizes. There were a variety of things on display, ranging from everyday jars and bottles to more specialist items such as pitchers, spittoons, and butter pots, to far rarer banks and chicken waterers, and even some really unique pieces like as bird homes, animal sculptures, and burial markers.

Mason Jars Replace Stoneware

Almost anything that we would use glass jars or tupperware for today was done with stoneware. There were many different types of containers made for a wide range of products ranging from water to soda to beer to meat to grain to jelly to pickled vegetables. There were a variety of goods on display, ranging from everyday jars and bottles to more specialist items such as pitchers, spittoons, and butter pots, to far rarer banks and chicken waterers, and even some really bizarre items such as bird homes, animal sculptures, and burial markers.

American Stoneware Glazing Techniques

Stoneware was used for anything that we would use glass jars or tupperware for today, and it was quite durable. It was used to store anything from water, soda, and beer to meat, grain, jelly, and pickled vegetables, and it was available in a broad range of shapes and sizes. There were a variety of things on display, ranging from everyday jars and bottles to more specialized items such as pitchers, spittoons, and butter pots, to far rarer banks and chicken waterers, and even some truly strange pieces like as bird homes, animal sculptures, and burial markers.

Salt Glazed Stoneware

The procedure of salt glazing was straightforward. As the piece was being burnt, a handful of common salt was placed into the kiln. When the material vaporized, it condensed onto the ware as an extremely thin coating of glassy silicate. The surface is clear and bright, yet it has a rough appearance similar to that of orange peel. The quantity of iron contained in the clay, as well as the concentration of oxygen in the burning environment, will determine the color of the finished vessel. The interiors were left unglazed in their most basic form, as was the outside.

Stoneware Crock Jugs – Related Products

Techniques like as salt glazing were easy to master. As the sculpture was being baked, a handful of table salt was placed into the kiln. When the material vaporized, it collected on the ware as a very thin coating of glassy silicate. Clear and sparkling, yet rough like orange peel, the surface has a unique appearance. The quantity of iron contained in the clay, as well as the concentration of oxygen in the fire environment, will determine the color of the vessel when it is completed. The interiors were left unglazed in their most fundamental form.

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American History 101: Moonshine

When most people think of moonshine, they envision a tall mason jar filled with a powerful, clear beverage. However, the history of the drink, as well as the drink itself, are considerably more complicated. Legal moonshine is now available on the shelves of liquor shops in bottles and jars that play up to the outlaw character of the corn-based beverage, which has gained widespread acceptance. The majority of people consider moonshine to be an unlawful alcoholic beverage. However, today’s legal moonshine is classed as “other” or “specialty spirit” by the Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau, which means it is not subject to the same restrictions as other spirits (TTB).

Where Did Moonshine Come From?

Scottish and Irish immigrants brought moonshine to the Appalachian mountains, where it became popular. They passed on their distilling knowledge to their neighbors and newer generations. Farmers relied on the illicit moonshine industry to help them survive severe winters, while others used it to supplement their income. The history of moonshine is intertwined with the history of the United States. Family distilleries may never have gotten together to create a beverage that was cleaner and more quickly distilled than whiskey if it weren’t for the American Revolution and the events that followed it.

What Is Moonshine?

Scotch and Irish immigrants brought moonshine to the Appalachian mountains, where it became popular among the local populace. This was something they passed on to their neighbors and newer generations. Moonshine became a method for farmers to make it through tough winters, as well as a way for others to supplement their income. It is important to remember that the history of moonshine is intertwined with the history of America. Family distilleries may never have came together to produce a beverage that was cleaner and more quickly distilled than whiskey if it weren’t for the American Revolution and the events that followed it.

The American Journey Of Moonshine

The United States government became one of the first major governments in the world to tax and regulate the alcohol business when it passed the Alcoholic Beverage Tax Act in 1791. Almost immediately after the United States government began to tax alcohol, its inhabitants began producing moonshine for their own consumption. Taxing alcoholic beverages was a smart method for the government to raise revenue, but it was unpopular with the general public. Consequently, for some, distilling illicit spirits became a part-time career, while for others it became a full-time employment.

The Whiskey Rebellion

The conflict between the government and its citizenry reached a boiling point in 1794, resulting in the start of the Whiskey Rebellion. The suppression of the uprising proved to be unpopular, and it became a liability for the Federalist party in the process. The Whiskey Tax was abolished in the year 1803. This, however, did not persist for long. In order to sustain the federal government during the Civil War, a new whiskey tax was enacted. The taxes on alcoholic beverages were as much as eight times higher than the cost of the alcoholic beverages themselves.

Tax collectors were turned into police officers by the Revenue Bureau of the United States Treasury Department. And with the emergence of the revenuers, the moonshiners were able to re-enter the market.

Prohibition

In the early 1900s, alcohol was rendered illegal in the vast majority of jurisdictions. Moonshine sales skyrocketed as a result of Prohibition and a strong temperance movement that sought to make the sale and use of alcoholic beverages illegal. Throughout the years and decades that followed, the production and sale of moonshine showed no signs of abating. From 1920 to 1933, the United States imposed a countrywide constitutional prohibition on the manufacture, importation, transportation, and sale of alcoholic drinks, which was in effect until 1933.

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As a result of the large number of dry counties in the South, moonshine distilling became increasingly popular in the region starting in the 1950s (and it still is to this day).

How Moonshine Got Its Name

The term “moonshine” refers to the period during which individuals produced the illicit liquor known as moonshine. Distillers operated their stills at night across the United States in order to evade discovery. Because of the restricted road network in Appalachia, distillation became popular among the locals. This made it simple to get away from police enforcement. It wasn’t long before distillers discovered a means to get over the oppressive hand of the law. Drinking moonshine comes with a number of dangers.

A faulty batch may contain potentially hazardous compounds such as methanol.

This is the origin of the expression “drinking yourself blind.”

XXX

You may have seen old movies where a jug of moonshine is labeled with a triple X, indicating that it contains alcohol. Prior to the invention of current distillation procedures, a batch of liquor had to be distilled three times in order to get a greater alcohol content—well beyond 80 percent by volume. The three Xs on the moonshine were there to show that it had been ran through three different times.

Bootleggers and Nascar

Moonshine distillers couldn’t accomplish it all on their own. It was also required that drivers be hired to deliver the booze around the country. “Bootleggers” and “runners” were the terms used to describe drivers who conveyed alcoholic drinks. They sneaked the items across the United States in automobiles that had been specially modified to increase their speed and load capacity. Engines and heavy-duty shock absorbers were installed in the automobiles to accommodate the additional weight. When they weren’t “working,” the bootleggers would compete against one another in races.

Big Bill France, a bootlegger, was the inspiration behind the group.

Legalize It

In 2005, the Piedmont Distilleries in North Carolina produced the first batch of legal moonshine in the United States. They began by selling fruit-infused moonshine in the hopes of restoring the reputation of moonshine. Other distilleries around the United States quickly followed suit. Moonshine distilling is no longer only an American tradition; it has spread around the world, with distilleries also operating in Scotland and Russia.

Several other nations, such as Albania, produce an alcoholic beverage known asraki, which is similar to moonshine but is prepared from a variety of fruits rather than maize. As the United States offers moonshine to the world, it is gaining popularity all around the world.

Good Ol’ American Past Time

The Piedmont Distilleries in North Carolina were the first to manufacture legal moonshine, which happened in 2005. As a way of regaining the reputation of moonshine, they began selling fruit-infused batches of the liquor. The example was quickly followed by other distilleries across the United States. It is no longer only an American phenomenon; distilleries in Scotland and Russia are already producing moonshine as a result of globalization. A drink known as Raki is produced in other countries, including Albania, that is similar to moonshine but is created from a variety of fruits rather than maize.

750 ml Clear Glass Moonshine Jug, Bar Top, 12/cs

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750 ml Clear Glass Moonshine Jug, Bar Top, 12/cs

The 750 mL moonshine jug is handcrafted in the United States of clear flint glass, making it the ultimate vessel to showcase your home brewed spirits. Because of its smooth, circular surface, it is quick and simple to add labels on it. If you produce your own moonshine or whiskey, this glass bottle is wonderful for storing it. It would also make a great container for mixers and juices. It has the distinctive handle that moonshine jugs are renowned for, which makes transporting it simple. It features a flat bottom and necessitates the use of a bar top closing.

*Corks are sold separately and are packaged in a 6×1 Re-Shipper Carton (6 per box).

  • 720 pieces per pallet (120 cases)
  • 6 pieces per case
  • 6 pieces per pallet (120 cases)

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White Whiskey Makes a Comeback

Just as much as the alcohol they hold, drinking cups convey a tale in and of themselves. Several years ago, an expert in antique drinkware told me about being served a ladleful of punch from what his host characterized as a colonial-era punch bowl that had been tenderly passed down through generations of a proud Southern family. He was kind in his acceptance of the drink. He did not advise the family that what they were in possession of was, in reality, an ancient chamber pot, not an antique punch bowl as they had assumed.

The jug in question is made of stoneware and has a robust shoulder.

That jar contains moonshine, which I’m sure everyone is aware of.

According to Daniel Ackermann, director of theMuseum of Early Southern Decorative Artsin Winston-Salem, North Carolina, “domestic alcohol manufacturing was considerable in the early days.” “It was a method of preserving your harvest.” Another important aspect of early pottery manufacture may be traced back to alcohol—both as a storage medium and as a fermenting agent.” Max Watman grew up in the Shenandoah Valley and is the author of the novel Chasing the White Dog, which is set amid the clandestine whiskey trade in the region’s mountains.

His research revealed that the immigrants along the ridges were primarily German and Scotch-Irish, and that they carried with them a heritage of ornamental arts and handicraft, according to him.

“And they poured moonshine into whatever containers they could find, and those jugs happened to be precisely what they could find.” When comic hillbillies became a famous meme, the moonshine jug made the transition from a dim holler to popular legend.

According to Hal Boyle, a journalist for the Associated Press in 1955, “the mythical hillbilly has become part of American legend.” The author describes him as “a shiftless figure in overalls who sprints across the hills barefooted…with an old hog rifle in one hand, and a jug of moonshine in the other.” Boyle set out to deconstruct the stereotype, but the character, along with his omnipresent jug, survived, owing in part to comic-book stars such as Li’l Abner and Snuffy Smith, who helped to popularize it.

Moonshine has made a comeback in the last decade or two, having been cleaned up, marketed, and made more palatable.

(Strict constructionists maintain that moonshine on the shelf of a liquor store is a con operation, because moonshine is prohibited by definition, and so cannot be sold.

It’s also known as white whiskey or white dog in some circles.

It’s a less obtrusive and less expensive approach of conveying a sense of community.

High Wire Distilling in Charleston, South Carolina, produces Jimmy Red whiskey, which is distilled and aged in oak barrels.

In a custom-made Le Creuset variant on the iconic moonshine jug, it’s now available to purchase.

According to a twist that no doubt would have perplexed Snuffy Smith, the jug form of the product sells for a higher price than the bottled version.

When it comes to margaritas, “I’d approach white whiskey the same way I would tequila, and I’d toss it in there,” she adds. Welcome to the world of today’s favorite drink, made with yesterday’s spirit. You may find her White Dog Margarita recipe at the bottom of this page.

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