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What Did They Call Old Moonshine? (Question)

Moonshine is known by many nicknames in English, including mountain dew, choop, hooch, homebrew, mulekick, shine, white lightning, white/corn liquor, white/corn whiskey, pass around, firewater, bootleg.

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  • It’s an old name that described the symptoms of many different diseases, including one called “Rheumatoid Arthritis”. Most moonshine is made from “corn mash” and moonshine is thus often called “corn whiskey”. Corn has a very high sugar content and thus was favored by American frontier farmers as a source for home-made alcohol.

Contents

What is traditional moonshine?

Moonshine purists define the spirit as a homemade, unaged whiskey, marked by its clear color, corn base and high alcohol content—sometimes peaking as high as 190 proof. Traditionally, it was produced in a homemade still and bottled in a mason jar. The spirit quickly became a mainstay of Southern culture.

What is bad moonshine called?

Methyl alcohol (methanol) is the bad stuff that could be found in moonshine. Pure methanol is very dangerous and it is definitely able to cause blindness and even kill people.

What were moonshine bars called?

A speakeasy, also called a blind pig or blind tiger, is an illicit establishment that sells alcoholic beverages, or a retro style bar that replicates aspects of historical speakeasies. Speakeasy bars came into prominence in the United States during the Prohibition era (1920–1933, longer in some states).

What is moonshine in history?

The term “moonshine” comes from the fact that illegal spirits were made under the light of the moon. In every part of America, early moonshiners worked their stills at night to avoid detection from authorities. The United States started taxing liquors and spirits shortly after the American Revolution.

Why is moonshine called white lightning?

White lightning, a white whiskey made surreptitiously and illegally, was once produced in great quantities in South Carolina. It got its name from its color and the kick it delivers when consumed.

Why is moonshine in Mason jars?

When you think moonshine, you think a mason jar. Moonshine just looks cooler when you drink it from a mason jar. Not only does it ensure the moonshine stays fresh but the jar also gives it the “authentic” moonshine feel that you would get during the prohibition period.

Is Everclear moonshine?

Both Everclear and Moonshine are unaged spirits; however, Everclear is made from grain and Moonshine from corn. Everclear is a brand name of a neutral-tasting, very potent grain alcohol. Moonshine is a general term used to describe illegally produced corn whiskey.

Why does moonshine give me diarrhea?

These changes include: Inflammation: The gastrointestinal tract becomes inflamed when it comes into contact with alcohol. Alcohol can also lead to more acid production in the stomach, which can increase the irritation and inflammation. This irritation can often lead to diarrhea.

Do moonshiners still exist?

Moonshine production today comes in many forms. There are still plenty of backwoods blackpot stills throughout the South, the traditional home of illegal liquor production. The operations he sees today are larger and more professional, with more people involved and larger stills, he says.

What is another word for moonshine?

synonyms for moonshine

  • bootleg.
  • firewater.
  • hooch.
  • rotgut.
  • bathtub gin.
  • home brew.
  • mountain dew.
  • white lightning.

What is the first cut of moonshine called?

Foreshots – “the low boiling point compounds that come out of the still first. They contain acetone, methanol, various esters and aldehydes, and other volitiles. Foreshots are to be considered poisonous and should be discarded.”

What is speakeasy style?

The biggest trend in nightlife and bars over the last decade is the rise of the “speakeasy” bar — cocktail bars that mimic the illicit, hidden bars that arose during Prohibition. This speakeasy trend re-introduced drink-making as an art similar to cooking.

Why is moonshine so illegal?

So why is moonshine still illegal? Because the liquor is worth more to the government than beer or wine. Today, federal rules say a household with two adults can brew up to 200 gallons of wine and the same amount of beer each year. (A few states have their own laws prohibiting the practice.)

What is moonshine slang for?

Moonshine is the glowing light that comes from the moon, and it’s also a common term meaning ” homemade liquor.” In an old-timey bluegrass song, a character might drink moonshine in the moonshine.

When did moonshine become illegal?

Fast forward to the Civil War era, and making moonshine without paying taxes was officially deemed illegal. In 1862 the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives’s (ATF) passed the 1862 Revenue Act.

Moonshine Runners And Their Role In The History Of Hot Rods

It is regarded a tradition in the Appalachian and Southern cultures; it has survived throughout the history of the South as a component of Appalachian and Southern culture. However, if you flip the pages of your calendar back a few years, you will discover that manufacturing moonshine was not always an art or a custom in the United States. It was a way of life and/or a method of surviving for many people who participated. To ensure that their families would have food on the table and a roof over their heads, men would distill moonshine in their homes.

Making moonshine is an art that is older than the United States of America, having been started in Colonial times in Appalachia by Scots-Irish immigrants who had landed in the Appalachian Mountains in quest of independence.

They didn’t carry much with them, but many of them were skilled in the art of whisky production, which they had mastered back in the Celtic highlands.

Fast forward to 1920, when Prohibition was declared, and the demand for moonshine began to soar in the United States’ largest cities.

  • It was a way of life and/or a method of surviving for many people who participated.
  • A large number of big city gangsters, including Al Capone, were involved in the industry, increasing demand for Moonshine.
  • When it comes to doing something unlawful, the law, on the other hand, always seems to find out.
  • During the prohibition era, speakeasies could be located in shady corners of major cities all throughout the country.
  • Moonshine was in high demand across the Southern United States and large cities around the United States because of its tax-free status, low price, and high alcohol content.
  • This proved to be a very tough undertaking due to the fact that most of the stills were concealed deep into the highlands and hills of Appalachia, making it extremely difficult to discover them.
  • To prevent the runner’s cars from delivering their cargo, the G-Men would set up shop all over the remote country roads and hide out there.

As a result of the large number of government agents on the roadways, the runners would have to carry the booze after midnight when the roads would be clear, in order to be able to drive quickly enough to outrun the Revenue officers.

The Automobiles Moonshiners would alter and hop up their automobiles in order to outrun the government-issued economy cars that agents used to transport their contraband.

Everything on the car had to be stock; there couldn’t be any flashy paint treatments or chrome exhaust pipes, or even excellent wheels on the car that would draw attention and make it stand out on the road.

The 1940 Ford Coupe was the automobile that the shiners preferred to drive the most of the time.

Another reason these Fords were so popular with the runners was the vast trunk space they offered, as well as the ease with which the suspension could be quickly modified to accommodate such hefty loads.

Various other automobiles, such as Oldsmobile Rocket 88s, Dodge Coronets, and Chevrolet Coupes, were also employed as carriers.

Willie Clay Call, a former shiner, even drove a 1961 Chrysler New Yorker, despite the fact that it was considered a luxury vehicle at the time.

The First Modifications have been made.

For example, according to the late Benny Parsons (former NASCAR driver and Moonshiner), one of the things that could be done to the vehicles to make them faster was to “install more carburetors so that the car can burn more fuel.” Edelbrock and Offenhauser intake manifolds were installed in order to increase the amount of air that could be fed into the Flathead engine.

The ability to expand the engine’s displacement in order to produce more horsepower was another popular alteration.

Likewise, Benny Parsons stated, “When the time came, they would switch in the Cadillac V8s to gain all the horsepower they could, or they would even put in the old Ambulance engines for long and fast hauls.” The modifications made by some of the runners enabled them to generate more than 500 horsepower.

  1. Consider what that would have been like in the 1960s on open roads.
  2. The loads that these cars were hauling were extremely heavy, and driving at high speeds would put a significant amount of strain on the vehicles.
  3. Despite this, several automobiles were involved in accidents and fatalities as a result of the high speeds of the chase and the stress placed on the vehicles.
  4. Although this proved to be a difficult challenge at first, the shiners were able to devise a solution thanks to their inventiveness: they added extra leaf springs to the suspension, which stiffened the suspension and allowed the shiners to carry more shine.
  5. Other alterations included (hence many of our suspension designs of today).
  6. The suspensions on these automobiles were so rigid that even when there was no weight in the car, the rear of the car would sit high in the air at the back of the vehicle.
  7. Techniques for concealing the cargo within the vehicle were also employed.

They were quite sneaky.

To make it more difficult for the authorities to trace them down, most moonshiners would use two license plates at the same time.

This license plate may have been taken from an old damaged automobile or it may have been stolen from a random car.

However, as we all know, this has not always been the case.

“It was all about running as quickly as you could because the man behind you was going to throw you in jail!” says Benny Parsons of the pursuits.

In Appalachia, the chases would often take place in the middle of the night on back roads through rural communities.

Because the majority of the Revenuers were unfamiliar with the terrain or backroads, it was more difficult for them to maneuver and drive throughout the chase.

To avoid being followed, they would install switches that shut off their tail lights, and they would have a switch that turned off their brake lights so that agents couldn’t see where they were stopping around the curves.

Those youngsters were well-versed on every freaking curve in the county, as well as how much speed they were capable of maintaining in various weather conditions.

The 180 was a technique that was frequently employed.

Junior Johnson, a legendary NASCAR driver and former show runner, used a variant of this manoeuvre.

As you might imagine, this would terrify the very daylights out of the agents, and they would all flee before they were even hit.

In his younger days, Junior was known as the man with the one-brake wheel on his hotrod.

Junior Johnson, like many of the other runners, was a teenager when he and his friends began delivering illicit alcoholic beverages.

As he puts it, “I didn’t need one since I wasn’t planning on stopping!” The beginning of stock car racing At the weekend races, the runners would gloat and quarrel over who had the fastest vehicle and which one of them was the best driver, and they would compete against each other.

Soon after, local carnival promoters recognized a chance to make money and began selling tickets for townspeople to come watch the races at the fairground.

Many of the dirt areas were converted into permanent tracks with enormous stands as a result of the popularity of the sport among the locals.

Stock car racing was in its infancy at the time.

By 1948, there were a number of permanent stock car tracks scattered around the country.

While this is only a quick introduction, check out some more in-depth information onRed Vogtand some of the early years.

Their ability to flee from the police while driving at high speeds on dirt back roads contributed significantly to the growth of NASCAR racing and the enthusiasm around racing.

A number of the moonshiners went on to become well-known NASCAR drivers, with Junior Johnson being the most notable among them for his contribution to the growth of the sport’s popularity.

In his professional baseball career, he made more than 300 starts and recorded more than 50 victories.

Johnson, even after becoming fame as a NASCAR racer, continued to haul shine in the after hours.

The Federal Agents happened to be in the area and were hoping to catch Johnson in the process of brewing moonshine when he was discovered.

There were a number of other moonshiners who went on to become successful NASCAR drivers, such as Benny Parsons, Charlie Mincey, Lee Petty, Tim Flock, and a number of others.

But even though their days are long gone, the history of the moonshiner runners has left a legacy that has given rise to the custom vehicles and hot rods that we all know and love today.

Josh Couter, one of our up-and-coming Rod Authority writers, deserves a special thank you for assembling this unique feature.

A Brief History of Moonshine

Finding and drinking moonshine is considered a rite of passage in the Southern United States. With its rebellious past and deadly image, moonshine has secured a position in popular culture as a result of its presence in the country’s history. When it comes to whiskey or other powerful alcoholic beverages that are created and sold illegally, moonshine is defined by the Oxford English Dictionary as follows: As a result of this classification, it may be perplexing to walk into a liquor store (or Costco) and see drink that has been classified as moonshine.

  • Unlike whiskey, which must be prepared from grain, distilled and bottled at a specific alcohol concentration, and matured in oak barrels,’shine does not have a comparable product in the marketplace.
  • There is no upper limit to the amount of alcohol in this drink, unlike vodka.
  • As a result, despite what you might have read in the Oxford English Dictionary, legally produced booze called “moonshine” can be found all over the world.
  • The word moonshine has been in use since the late 15th century, but it was only in the 18th century that it was first used to refer to alcoholic beverages in England.
  • When grain mills were operating at the time, farmers who had extra produce would distill it in order to keep it from spoiling.
  • The “whiskey tax,” as it was known at the time, was imposed by the federal government on liquor produced within the country in 1791.
  • marshal to Pennsylvania to collect the taxes owed.
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Their leader was assassinated, which sparked a massive demonstration that drew approximately 6000 people.

There is a lot of truth to the folklore and legends around moonshine.

Despite the fact that some moonshiners say that these stories were published in an effort to discredit their work, legitimate producers are of the opposite opinion.

Don’t make the mistake of conflating moonshiners with bootleggers.

The termbootlegger originally referred to the practice of concealing flasks in the boot tops of automobiles in the 1880s, but with the development of automobiles, it came to apply to anybody who smuggled alcoholic beverages.

During their time spent evading the cops, these whiskey runners picked up some serious driving talents.

NASCAR and moonshiners were so intertwined, in fact, that a moonshiner provided seed money to Bill France, the organization’s founder.

After inheriting the fortune of his father, who was an infamous moonshiner, this former driver and NASCAR team owner recently teamed up with a North Carolina distillery to create “Midnight Moon.” No matter what you choose to call it—moonshine, white lightning, firewater, skullpop, mountain dew, or just moonshine—its rebellious past and controversial present make it a terrible drink.

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Moonshine Runners & Cars They Drove – History – Hot Rod Magazine

The aged moonshine-hauling vehicles of Willie Clay Call are kept ready in the garage adjacent to his home in the Appalachian foothills of Wilkes County, North Carolina, much like old thoroughbreds in their stalls at a race stable. These automobiles’ rear suspensions are still ultra-stiff and ready to support the weight of more than 100 gallons of white lightning that they would transport from the foothills to Winston-Salem, Lexington, or other locations in the east. They sit about waiting for cargoes that will never arrive from creek-side stills that are no longer in operation.

  1. It is not so much the perseverance of law enforcement as it is the expansion of legal booze and ABC shops into traditionally dry Southern states and counties that have brought the moonshine culture to its knees.
  2. The moonshine industry, which had been in existence since colonial times, was on the verge of extinction until it went out in a blaze of iconic glory and real-life drama as a result of its incorporation into another distinctly American custom-thehot rod.
  3. “My father was a moonshiner, and my grandfather was involved as well.” -Willie Clay’s Phone Number The majority of the veteran moonshiners have reached their golden years.
  4. Junior Johnson, a long-time acquaintance, is 74 years old.
  5. It doesn’t matter if the market is still there; they have long since lost the motivation to deal with it.
  6. The moonshiners, like any successful businessperson, diversified their operations.
  7. There is no longer a need or necessity for white lightning.

In Callsay’s words, “I utilized all of them autos for a-haulin.” Call has 14 more ’40 Fords in another garage, as well as other miscellaneous cars, according to the owner.

When the Dodge was first introduced, he ordered three of them, one of which being the ’66.

“They didn’t make more than 40 miles per hour with this engine,” Call claims.

“I’m down to one and a half now.” He made a sale on one.

As a result, he claims, one of his drivers “drove it into the pond down there in Concord while therevenuers was a-running him.” “In the end, I was able to get the motorback.

In order to keep it in storage, they had taken the engine out of the automobile.

” How did he get his hands on it?

“I don’t know if he purchased it or stole it, but one.” Even the big-finned, baby blue New Yorker would be hard pressed to pass for HOT ROD material.

This is the vehicle that he will mention first and most frequently.

However, there will be no race to get there.

Probably more booze has been transported by this vehicle than by any other vehicle on the road.” A total of more than 300,000 miles have been logged by the New Yorker, either under Call’s foot or under the foot of another driver, and it has sustained many gunshot holes in its body.

I said, “No, I didn’t,” and I meant it.

Those were the days back in the ’80s.” In his younger days, Junior was known as the man with the one-brake wheel on his hotrod.

Junior installed a pair of toggle switches to the left of the steering column, which, when switched, turned off the brake lights, taillights, or both at the push of a button.

“Unless it was loaded, you never saw that automobile on the road,” Callsays as.

Not only did the moonshiners’ ability and ingenuity as vehicle constructors and drivers depend on their ability and imagination as moonshiners, but their very independence depended on it as well.

“Out on the highway, you’re on the run for your life,” the singer says.

“I was never apprehended while hauling.” The only thing Johnson would tell you is that Stock Carracing was a step down from moonshine running, and not just because of the legal ramifications of that decision.

“You could customize the automobiles we drove on the road to your heart’s content.” In addition, they were turbocharged and supercharged.

There was never a moment when we were able to do anything we wanted with the race vehicles, including the Modifieds.

It’s unbelieveable how much power can be packed into that powertrain by using a supercharger or turbocharger.

We could bore and stroke them for as long as we wanted to.

According to Call, he outran Lorenzen lap after lap.

It had the ability to transport it to a location where the road was so small that you couldn’t conceive how quickly that thing was a-running.” It was impossible for the treasury agents and other law enforcement personnel to keep up with the automobiles driven by the moonshiners.

“However, we lacked another component that they possessed—the drivers.” It’s impossible to believe how well those men could drive an automobile.

They learnt how to drive and were familiar with every curve, even though some of them were murdered while doing so.” Despite his popularity as a Stock Car racer and team owner, Johnson never thought of himself as superior to the other moonshine racers he competed against.

“On the highway, there were a number of individuals who were as skilled as I was.

That required a specific talent, which Johnson possessed in plenty.

The two of us were driving back through Winston-Salem one night at approximately 3 o’clock in the morning after unloading a cargo when Junior started driving sideways.

I said, Junior, you’re going have the lawon you.

When asked, he responded, “If we can’t outrun ’em empty, what the hell are we doing down here loaded?” I was certain that we could outrun them, loaded or unloaded, but I was dreading the voyage.

Apparently, the automobile was afraid of him.

Setting a shop over on the other side of the world was difficult for me.

‘Ah, c’mon,’ Junior would exclaim.

Old 1940 Fords with flathead V-8 engines dominated the moonshine scene until the 1950s, when they were phased out.

Johnson and Call would scour auctions for Cadillac ambulances, rip the engine out, bore and stroke it to extract every cubic inch of capacity possible, then put a supercharger on the back of the vehicle.

According to Call, the 413 in the 1961 New Yorker encouraged the car to travel at 180mph, “uphill or downhill, loaded or empty,” no matter what the conditions were.

The moonshiners, when they were younger men in the 1940s and 1950s, were also involved in the blossoming hot rod culture in Southern California.

cylinder heads from Offenhauser and Edelbrock, as well as crankshafts, pistons, and connecting rods, and all kinds of other parts.

Then, when we got really into it, we discovered that California didn’t have quite as excellent a selection as we did.” Despite the fact that they were never apprehended on the road, Johnson, Call, and many other moonshiners felt the sting of the law.

For failing to pay the requisite federal charges on booze, it became something of a factory, converting bootleggers into federal inmates by the dozens.

It was almost always the case that when the bus arrived a few days later, the moonshiners would already be waiting for it to transport them to prison.

He entered a guilty plea in the case.

Johnson won the Daytona 500 in 1960, nine months after his acquittal on all charges.

Johnson decided to leave the moonshining industry the next year because he was doing well in racing and was weary of being pursued.

In 1960, he was found guilty on conspiracy charges and sentenced to prison.

“It was hard for me to leave down there,” he admits.

It was an Air Force Base, after all.

I had access to a vehicle and could go wherever I wanted on the base.

Today, he is a one-man archive of the culture, with a fleet of moonshinecars of his own, a collection of more than 40 handcrafted copper cookers, and a well-hidden “mock” still on acreage he owns in the WilkesCounty woods, where he lives.

The museum is planned to open this year.

“It’ll cover the history of Wilkes County, including horseracing, bootlegging, fighting, and everything else,” says the author.

There are approximately 40 copper cookers in Call’s collection, some of which he used himself. This is the largest of these handcrafted copper cookers. According to Call, he continued to produce moonshine into the 1980s.

5 Things You Didn’t Know About Moonshine’s History

Located in the garage next to Willie Clay Call’s house in the Appalachian foothills of Wilkes County, North Carolina, his ancient moonshine-hauling vehicles are kept in tip-top condition like thoroughbreds in stalls at a racetrack. Their rear suspensions are still ultra-stiff and ready to withstand the weight of more than 100 gallons of white lightning that the vehicles would transport from the foothills to Winston-Salem, Lexington, or other locations in the eastern United States They sit about waiting for shipments that will never arrive from creek-side stills that are no longer in operation..

  • It is not so much the perseverance of police enforcement as it is the proliferation of legal booze and ABC stores in traditionally dry Southern states and counties that have brought the moonshine culture to its knees.
  • Their industry, which had been in existence since colonial times, was on the verge of extinction until it was brought together with another distinctly American custom-thehot rod.
  • During the 1950s and 1960s, large cargoes, fast automobiles, and strict laws all came together in a spectacular display of high-speed chases, roadblocks, wildescapes and crashes—and, on rare instances, gunplay.
  • -Willie Clay’s telephone number Almost all of the ancient moonshiners have reached the end of their lives today.
  • Junior Johnson, a long-time acquaintance, is 74 years old.
  • However, even if the market were still active, they would have no need to bother.
  • The moonshiners, like any successful businessperson, expanded their operations.

In North Wilkesboro, where the majority of the former moonshiners now live, they raise chickens for the local Tyson processing facility, which serves as the economic backbone of the town.

Six 1940 Fords with flathead V-8s, a ’66 Dodge Coronet 440 with a 426 Hemi, and a ’61 Chrysler New Yorker are housed in the enormous garage behind Call’s house in rural Wilkes County, the self-described moonshine capital of America.

In Callsay’s words, “I hauled everything in these automobiles.” Other than that, Call owns 14 other 1940 Fords in a separate garage, as well as a collection of other cars.

In 1966, he placed an order for three Dodges, one of which being the 66.

In Call’s words, “they only got 40 miles out of this engine.” “I went out and purchased three.” And now I’ve got an hour and a half.” His first sale was a single unit.

In Concord, he claims that one of his drivers “drove it into a pond while the crowds were chasing after him.” “I was able to get the motorback in the end.” Getting it took me several years, but I finally did it.

A friend of mine who worked down there was able to obtain the item on my behalf, and I was grateful.

When asked, Call replies, “I don’t know.” “Doesn’t matter if he purchased it or stole it.” Even the big-finned, baby blue New Yorker isn’t exactly the stuff of HOT ROD fantasy.

First and foremost, this is the vehicle that he will mention the most.

Ahead of time, however, there will be no racing.

Probably more booze has been transported by this vehicle than by any other automobile ever.” A total of more than 300,000 miles have been logged in the New Yorker, either under Call’s foot or under the foot of another driver, and it has sustained many gunshot holes in its body.

My response was emphatic: “Nah, definitely not.” However, I was able to determine where they originated.

He could go down the road, press the brake, turn about in one lane of a highway, and then head back the opposite way at breakneck speed,” she says.

To the left of the steering column, Junior mounted a pair of toggle switches.

After overdriving a bend while on the trail of Call, more than one chasing lawman wound up in a roadside ditch.

Fortunately, I managed to conceal it.” Call’s automobiles may not be the most aesthetically pleasing hot rods you’ll ever see, but their place in the history of American automobile culture is unquestionably established.

In the racing world, you’re always on the run to beat someone, Johnson says with a drawl.

It was impossible for them to catch me a-haulin.

According to Johnson, “I had some really fast race cars, but I’ve never been able to run anything as fast as I could with the quickest vehicles I had on the highway.” If you wanted to customize the automobiles that we drove about town, you could do so to the tip.” They were also supercharged and turbocharged, to add to their performance.

  1. Even with the Modifieds, there was never a point in time when we could do everything we wanted to the cars.
  2. It’s astonishing how much power can be packed into that powertrain by using a supercharger or turbocharger.
  3. We could bore and massage them for as long as we want.
  4. Call claims that he consistently outran Lorenzen.
  5. You didn’t have much of a high end on ’em even with the supercharger,” says the driver.
  6. When the road was so tiny, you couldn’t image how quickly that thing was a-runnin’,” it had the ability to transport it.

According to former federalAlcohol Tax Unit (ATU) agent Joe Carter, who apprehended Johnson on foot at his father’s still in 1956, the automobiles the government provided were referred to as “mechanical miscarriages.” “I nicknamed the cars the government supplied us’mechanical miscarriages,'” Carter said.

  1. At 14 years old, they were capable of outrunning any cop I was familiar with.
  2. Most of the men who transported alcohol were safe drivers, according to Johnson.
  3. But once you go into the race ring and the car is set up to only go left, you can virtually quadruple your speed driving off into a turn.
  4. Thurmond Brown, a fellow moonshiner, recounted how terrible it was to travel with Junior while he was blazing down the North Carolina roadways at full speed a few years back.
  5. That’s right, those old mailboxes and newspaper boxes were right next to my face, and Junior was just a clippin’ by them.
  6. As a result of this, I believe he became about half-crazy.
  7. It didn’t matter if we were loaded or not; I was dreading the journey.

One of Junior’s favorite things to do was whip an automobile.

He threw it on the ground.

He’d pass another car on the right side of the road, and the air would be thick with dirt and grass, and that ol’ back quarter-panel would be well up in the filthy woods, surrounded by honeysuckle and other noxious weeds and things.

Whenever we arrive, it’ll be ready for us.” For most of the 1940s, the vintage Fords with their flathead V-8 engines dominated the moonshine scene.

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This was the most common modification that moonshiners performed on their vehicles.

That old Ford would keep on trucking, as they say in WilkesCounty.

The automobile weighed close to 4,750 pounds when it was fully loaded with 25 cases of whiskey, each weighing around 750 pounds each.

To begin with, Johnson explains, “we did everything ourselves.” cylinder heads from Offenhauser and Edelbrock, along with crankshafts, pistons, rods, and a whole bunch of other stuff.” Eventually, though, we took over and did everything on our own.

Moonshining was so prevalent in Wilkes County during the mid-20th century that the federal government established a tiny courtroom in North Wilkesboro to handle all of the criminal cases.

Moonshiners often pled guilty to the crimes brought against them; according to local legend, they were so honest that they were instructed after sentence when to report for the prison bus and then sent home.

When Johnson was arrested at his father’s still in 1956, he served 11 months and 3 days in a federal jail near the zenith of his career as a Stock Car racer.

When Junior was accused of producing liquor in 1959, NASCAR officials took the stand to help him establish he was racing at the time of the suspected crime.

Johnson won the Daytona 500, the most important race of his career, nine months after being acquitted.

Call, on the other hand, was arrested and sentenced to prison for seven months, as well as the loss of many autos.

Unlike Johnson, who was sentenced to the federal penitentiary in Chillicothe, Ohio, Call was imprisoned at Donaldson Air Force Base in Greensville, South Carolina.

My favorite part was when the author said, It was an Air Force Base, after all.

With my own vehicle, I was able to travel anyplace on the base I want.

As of today, he is a one-man archive of the culture, with a fleet of moonshinecars of his own, a collection of more than 40 homemade copper cookers, and a well-hidden “mock” still on land he owns in the WilkesCounty woods, among other things.

As Johnson points out, “they’re doing pretty well with it.” “It’ll have the history of Wilkes County andracing, bootlegging, fighting, and everything else,” says the narrator.

Among Call’s collection of approximately 40 handcrafted copper cookers, this is the largest and includes some that he personally used. As far as we know, Call was still producing moonshine in the 1980s.

1. Not all moonshine is illegal, nor is it dangerous.

The antique moonshine-hauling vehicles of Willie Clay Call, who lives in the Appalachian foothills of Wilkes County, North Carolina, are kept ready in a garage next to his house, much like old thoroughbreds in their stalls at a race stable. Their rear suspensions are still ultra-stiff and ready to support the weight of more than 100 gallons of white lightning that the vehicles would transport from the mountains to Winston-Salem, Lexington, or other locations east. They sit about waiting for cargoes that will never arrive from creek-side stills that are no longer in operation.

  1. The introduction of legal booze and ABC shops into traditionally dry Southern states and counties has effectively put an end to the moonshine culture.
  2. The moonshine business, which had been in existence since colonial times, was on the verge of extinction until it was brought together with another distinctly American custom-thehot rod-and went out in a blaze of iconic splendor and real-life drama.
  3. “My father was a moonshiner, and my grandfather was also involved.” -Willie Clay’s phone number The majority of the old moonshiners have reached their golden years now.
  4. Junior Johnson, a close friend, is 74 years old.
  5. It doesn’t matter if the market is still around; they have long since lost the motivation to bother with it.
  6. The moonshiners, like any successful businessman, diversified their operations.
  7. The majority of the former moonshiners now work as chicken raisers at the local Tyson processing factory in North Wilkesboro, which is the economic backbone of the community.

The big garage behind Call’s house in rural Wilkes County, the self-proclaimed moonshine capital of America, is home to six 1940 Ford flathead V-8s, a 1966 Dodge Coronet 440 with a 426 Hemi, and a 1961 Chrysler New Yorker.

“I utilized all of these vehicles for a-haulin’,” Callsays explains.

These automobiles served as instruments in his distribution business, and once his trading days were through, he retained ownership of the automobiles.

It seemed as though the automobiles coming out of Detroit were being tailored just for the moonshiners during the 1960s.

“I purchased three of them.

He lost the other in a car chase shortly after purchasing it.

They’d removed the engine from the vehicle and placed it in storage.

” What method did he use to obtain it?

“I’m not sure if he purchased it or stole it, one.” The big-finned, baby blue New Yorker isn’t exactly the stuff of HOT ROD.

This is the vehicle that he will mention first and most often.

“I’ve been ran over several times in it.

It would go 180 miles per hour, loaded or empty, uphill or downhill—it didn’t make a difference to it.

I had it painted seven or eight years ago, and a lad called me up and said, ‘You know there’s a couple of gunshot holes in your car?'” Call explains.

It happened back in the 1980s.” Jr.

He could drive down the road and apply the brakes, turning around in one lane of a highway and returning the opposite way at high speed.” Agent Joe Carter from the ATU With one small tweak, the dashboard is ready for production.

More than one chasing officer wound up in a roadside ditch after overdriving a bend while on the trail of Call.

“I didn’t keep it in the home or anything like that.

Not only did the moonshiners’ ability and ingenuity as automobile constructors and drivers depend on their ability and imagination as moonshiners, but their entire independence depended on it.

“You’re on the run for your life out on the highway.” The statement, which Junior Johnson is extremely proud of, is more important to him than any trophy at his beautiful country house or any victory in his 50 years of NASCAR racing.

I have some really fast race cars, but I’ve never been able to run anything as fast as the vehicles I used to drive on the highway,” Johnson admits.

They were also supercharged and turbocharged, to top it all off.

There was never a moment when we were able to do everything we wanted to the race vehicles, including the Modifieds.

It’s incredible how much power a supercharger or turbocharger can pack into an engine of that size.

We could bore and stroke them for hours on end.

Call claims he outran Lorenzen lap after lap, and he’s right.

” “You didn’t have any top end on ’em even though you had a supercharger on them.” That item would simply keep getting better and better.

According to former federalAlcohol Tax Unit (ATU) agent Joe Carter, who apprehended Johnson on foot at his father’s still in 1956, the automobiles the government provided were “mechanical miscarriages.” “However, we lacked another component that they possessed-the drivers.” Those men have insane driving skills you wouldn’t believe.

  • They learnt how to drive and were familiar with every bend, albeit several of them were murdered while doing so.” Although he was well-known as a Stock Car racer and team owner, Johnson did not feel himself superior to the other moonshine racers.
  • “On the highway, there were a number of individuals who were just as excellent as I was.
  • Thurmond Brown, a fellow moonshiner, once described how terrible it was to travel with Junior while he was singing full song on the roads of North Carolina.
  • That’s right, those old mailboxes and newspaper boxes were right next to my face, and Junior was just clippin’ along by them.
  • And, I suppose, that caused him to go half-crazy.
  • I was certain that we could outrun them, loaded or not, but I was dreading the journey.
  • He made the automobile nervous.

Making the transition from one side to another was difficult for me.

‘Ah, c’mon,’ Junior would say.

Replace the flathead V-8 engine with the largest Cadillac engine they could locate, which happened to be in the company’s ambulances.

Johnson and Call would scour auctions for Cadillac ambulances, rip the engine out, bore and stroke it to extract every cubic inch of capacity possible, then put a supercharger on the back of it.

According to Call, the 413 in the 1961 New Yorker encouraged the car to travel at 180mph, “uphill or downhill, loaded or empty,” regardless of the road conditions.

The moonshiners, when they were younger men in the 1940s and 1950s, took advantage of the blossoming hot rod scene in Southern California.

cylinder heads from Offenhauser and Edelbrock, along with crankshafts, pistons, rods, and all kinds of other parts.

Later, as we were more committed, we discovered that California didn’t have quite as excellent of a selection as we did.” Despite the fact that they were never apprehended on the highway, Johnson, Call, and many other moonshiners felt the sting of the law.

Because of their failure to pay the obligatory federal duties on booze, bootleggers were rounded up and imprisoned in large numbers.

Invariably, when the bus arrived a few days later, the moonshiners would be waiting for it to transport them to prison.

He admitted his culpability in the case.

Johnson won the Daytona 500, the most important race in his career, nine months after his acquittal.

Call, on the other hand, was arrested and sentenced to prison for seven months, as well as the loss of multiple vehicles.

Unlike Johnson, who was sentenced to the federal penitentiary in Chillicothe, Ohio, Call was imprisoned at Donaldson Air Force Base in Greenville, South Carolina.

“If I’d had a paying job, I would have remained.” It was quite enjoyable for me.

They provided a delicious meal in there.

And I picked up two or three new customers who were pleased with my work.” During HOT ROD’s visit, Call confessed for the first time that he had continued to manufacture and transport illicit booze far into the 1980s.

Both Johnson and Call have given automobiles, as well as other moonshine and racing artifacts, to a new museum in North Wilkesboro that is set to open this year in the Old Courthouse building.

“It’ll cover the history of Wilkes County andracing, bootlegging, fighting, — everything else.” Among Call’s collection of over 40 handcrafted copper cookers, this is the biggest, and it includes those that he personally used.

His son, Call, claims that he continued to produce moonshine into the 1980s.

2. A triple X once indicated a moonshine’s quality.

The aged moonshine-hauling vehicles of Willie Clay Call are kept ready in the garage adjacent to his home in the Appalachian foothills of Wilkes County, North Carolina, much like elderly thoroughbreds in their stalls at a racetrack. Their rear suspensions are still extremely rigid and ready to support the weight of more than 100 gallons of white lightning that the vehicles would transport from the mountains to Winston-Salem, Lexington, or other locations east. They sit and wait for cargoes that will never arrive from creek-side stills that are no longer in operation.

  1. The growth of legal liquor and ABC shops into traditionally dry Southern states and counties has effectively put an end to the moonshine industry.
  2. The moonshine industry, which had been in existence since colonial times, was on the verge of extinction until it went out in a blaze of iconic splendor and real-life drama as a result of its incorporation into another distinctly American custom-thehot rod.
  3. “My daddy was a moonshiner, and my grandfather was involved as well.” -Willie Clay’s Telephone Call The majority of the veteran moonshiners are now in their golden years.
  4. Junior Johnson, a longtime acquaintance, is 74 years old.
  5. Even if the market was still in existence, they had long since outgrown the need to deal with it.
  6. The moonshiners, like any successful businessman, expanded their operations.
  7. The majority of the former moonshiners now work as chicken raisers at the local Tyson processing factory in North Wilkesboro, which serves as the economic backbone of the community.

The big garage behind Call’s house in rural Wilkes County, the self-described moonshine center of America, is home to six 1940 Ford flathead V-8s, a 1966 Dodge Coronet 440 with a 426 Hemi, and a 1961 Chrysler New Yorker.

“I utilized all of these automobiles for a-haulin’,” Callsays explains.

These automobiles served as instruments in his distribution business, and once his trading days were done, he kept the automobiles.

In the 1960s, the automobiles coming out of Detroit continued growing more powerful and quicker, as if they were being built specifically for the moonshiners.

“I purchased three of them.” “I’ve got one and a half now.” He was successful in selling one.

One of his drivers “drove it into a pond down there in Concord when therevenuers was a-runnin’ him,” he recalls.

It took me several years, but I finally got it.

I have a friend who worked down there who went and retrieved it for me.

“I really don’t know,” Call admits.

It was the sort of automobile that a doctor or a lawyer would drive, and it was his most effective and best-driving moonshine car.

“That Chrysler would carry on,” Call predicts.

It could go 180 miles per hour loaded or empty, uphill or downhill—it didn’t matter.

“I had it painted maybe seven or eight years ago,” Call recalls, “and the lad contacted me and said, ‘You know there’s a couple of gunshot holes in your car?'” I responded by saying, “No, I certainly didn’t.” I was able to find out where they originated from, though.

was known as the person who drove a hotrod with a one-brake steering wheel.

Junior installed a set of toggle switches to the left of the steering column that, when flicked, turned out the brake lights, the taillights, or both.

“Unless it was loaded, you never saw that automobile on the road,” Callsays explains.

Not only did the moonshiners’ livelihood depend on their ability and ingenuity as vehicle constructors and drivers, but their entire freedom depended on it as well.

“Out on the highway, you’re on the run for your life.” No trophy at Junior Johnson’s magnificent country house, and no victory in his 50 victories in NASCAR racing, means more to him than his pride in the statement.

“I had some really fast race cars, but I’ve never been able to run anything as fast as the vehicles I had on the highway,” Johnson adds.

We were free to do anything we wanted to them.

NASCAR wouldn’t allow them to use turbochargers, superchargers, or anything else of the kind.

And there were no restrictions on the number of cubic inches we might use.

A lot of the time, we’d run 500 cubic inches.” Clay Call never ran in the inaugural Stock Car race, but he did take his supercharged ’55 Ford out onto the track at North Wilkesboro Speedway in the early 1960s, where Fred Lorenzen, the Golden Boy of NASCAR’s early years, was training.

“We didn’t back down from doing anything we could to make ’em faster,” Johnson adds.

That monstrosity would simply keep getting higher and higher.

“I referred to the automobiles the government provided us as’mechanical miscarriages,'” recalls former federalAlcohol Tax Unit (ATU) agent Joe Carter, who was the man who apprehended Johnson on foot at his father’s still in 1956.

By the time they reached the age of fourteen, they were faster than any officer I had ever encountered.

“The vast majority of the people that transported liquor were competent drivers,” Johnson adds.

Thurmond Brown, a fellow moonshiner, once described how scary it was to travel with Junior as he was blazing down the North Carolina roadways at full speed.

And those tiny old mailboxes and newspaper boxes, well, Junior was just a clippin’ by those things right beside my face.

And, I suppose, it drove him to the verge of psychosis.

I knew we’d be able to outrun them, loaded or not, but I was dreading the journey.

The automobile was terrified of him.

But settling in over there on the other side was a challenge for me.

‘Come on, Junior,’ he would urge.

Replace the flathead V-8 engine with the largest Cadillac engine they could locate, which happened to be in the company’s ambulances.

You might be interested:  How Does A Still Work Moonshine?

Johnson and Call would scour auctions for Cadillac ambulances, yank the engine out, bore and stroke it to extract every cubic inch of capacity possible, and slap a supercharger on it.

According to Call, the 413 in the 1961 New Yorker encouraged the car to travel at 180mph “uphill or downhill, loaded or empty.” The automobile weighed close to 4,750 pounds when fully loaded with 25 cases of booze, each weighing around 750 pounds.

“We did it right away,” Johnson adds.

Later, as we were more committed, we discovered that California didn’t have quite as excellent a selection as we did.” While Johnson, Call, and many other moonshiners were never apprehended on the road, they did experience the wrath of the authorities.

It turned into something of a factory, converting bootleggers into federal convicts by the dozens for failing to pay the mandatory federal liquor taxes.

Invariably, when the bus arrived a few days later, the moonshiners would be ready for it to take them to prison.

He entered a guilty plea for the offense.

In 1960, nine months after his acquittal, Johnson won the Daytona 500, the most important race of his career.

Call, on the other hand, lost many autos to the federal authorities, as well as seven months of his life.

Unlike Johnson, who was sentenced to the federal penitentiary in Chillicothe, Ohio, Call served his sentence at Donaldson Air Force Base in Greensville, South Carolina.

“If I’d had a paying job, I’d have remained.

After all, it was an Air Force Base.

I had access to a vehicle and was able to travel anyplace I wanted on the base.

Today, he is a one-man archive of the culture, with a fleet of moonshinecars of his own, a collection of more than 40 homemade copper cookers, and a well-hidden “mock” still on land he owns in the WilkesCounty woods.

“They’re dealing with it quite well,” Johnson adds.

“It’ll include the history of Wilkes County, including horseracing, bootlegging, fighting, and everything else.” This handmade copper cooker is the largest of perhaps 40 in Call’s collection, some of which he used himself. According to Call, he continued to brew moonshine into the 1980s.

3. Moonshine inspired NASCAR.

For the avoidance of doubt, moonshiners produce the whiskey while bootleggers carry it. The name “bootlegger” was used in the 1880s to describe smugglers who would conceal flasks in the tips of their boots. Of course, as automobiles entered the scene, the term’s definition was broadened to include anybody involved in smuggling booze. As troops returned home from World War II, equipped with new mechanical abilities, they immediately found work as bootleggers in their own areas. Modifying automobiles allowed these modern bootleggers to increase the amount of moonshine they could carry while also gaining the driving abilities essential to escape the authorities.

More than just a source of bragging rights, this rite laid the groundwork for the modern-day NASCAR.

To this day, the official spirit of NASCAR is produced at the moonshine-based distillerySugarlands Distilling Co.

There, they manufacture ” Sugarlands Shine ” in a range of unique tastes ranging from old fashioned lemonade and blueberry muffin to maple bacon, root beer, and peanut butter and jelly.

4. America’s first legal moonshine distillery was launched in 2005.

Piedmont Distillers, based in Madison, North Carolina, boasts the distinction of being the first legal moonshine business in the United States, as well as the state’s first legal distillery since Prohibition ended the prohibition era. Additionally, in addition to being a part of the history of moonshine, Piedmont’s whole company is dedicated to telling the unique tale of moonshine. A triple-distilled moonshine (remember those three Xs?) made with formulas given down from famed moonshiner and NASCAR Hall of Famer Junior Johnson, their Midnight Moonmoonshine is made using recipes passed down from Junior Johnson.

Since 2005, several legal moonshine distilleries have sprung up around the United States, including Sugarlands (Tennessee) and Call Family Distillers, which is likewise situated in North Carolina but produces in Tennessee.

5. Mountain Dew was originally created as a chaser for whiskey.

The brilliant yellow beverage you’re undoubtedly familiar with was called after a slang phrase for mountain-brewed moonshine, which you may not have realized at the time of its introduction. Yes, you are correct. In Knoxville, Tennessee, in 1932, brothers Barney and Ally Hartman invented the lemon-lime cocktail as a whiskey chaser for their friends. In accordance with the Smithsonian Institution, the name “Mountain Dew” was chosen to stress the intended usage of their beverage, which was emphasized further by the existence of the original brand mascot, “Willy the Hillbilly,” and his slogan, “It’ll tickle yore innards.” As a result of PepsiCo’s acquisition of Mountain Dew in 1964, distribution was increased beyond Tennessee and throughout the rest of the United States.

  1. Although the brand’s link with moonshine has developed since then, its legacy is still alive and well.
  2. Check out this article.
  3. You’ll receive comprehensive, practical, and hands-on training from industry professionals throughout the program.
  4. More information is available here: http://www.cnn.com/cnn/cnn/cnn/cnn/cnn/cnn/cnn/cnn/cnn/cnn/cnn/cnn/cnn/cnn/cnn/cnn/cnn/cnn/cnn/cnn/cnn/cnn/cnn/cnn/c Content that is related Moonshine University is holding a celebration of the “Moonshine.” The StaveThief Society has officially launched.

From Moonshine to NASCAR

Moonshine is a type of alcoholic beverage that is produced under the cover of darkness in order to avoid discovery of smoke rising from clandestine stills. When the United States Constitution’s 18th Amendment prohibited the sale of alcoholic beverages, the illicitly manufactured high-proof distilled spirit known as moonshine saw an explosion in popularity. So started the Prohibition era (1920-1933), which resulted in an expansion of illicit smuggling of alcoholic beverages throughout the United States.

After the invention of the automobile, bootleggers became a general term to apply to anybody who smuggled alcoholic beverages by the mail or by car (of the alcohol variety).

They did this by modifying the engines and suspensions of their vehicles in order to make them quicker.

Moonshine Running Stock Cars

Moonshine is a type of alcoholic beverage that is made under the cover of darkness in order to avoid discovery of smoke rising from clandestine stills. When the United States Constitution’s 18th Amendment prohibited the sale of alcoholic beverages, the illicitly manufactured high-proof distilled liquor known as moonshine gained enormous appeal. In this way, the Prohibition era (1920-1933) and the subsequent expansion of illicit smuggling of alcoholic beverages across the country had their starts.

After the invention of the automobile, bootleggers became a general term to apply to anybody who smuggled alcoholic beverages through the mail or on foot (of the alcohol variety).

Moonshine runners were the term used to describe these automobiles.

Racing Bootleggers

Moonshine is a type of alcoholic beverage that is made under the cover of night in order to avoid discovery of smoke rising from clandestine stills, hence earning the term. When the United States Constitution’s 18th Amendment prohibited the sale of alcoholic beverages, the illicitly manufactured high-proof distilled liquor known as moonshine soared in popularity. So started the Prohibition era (1920-1933), which resulted in an expansion of illicit smuggling of alcoholic beverages across the United States.

After the invention of the automobile, bootleggers became a general term to apply to anybody who sneaked alcoholic beverages (of the alcohol variety).

The engines and suspensions of bootleggers’ automobiles and trucks were upgraded in the aim of increasing their chances of outrunning prohibition police officers. Moonshine runners were the name given to these automobiles.

The History of Moonshine Jugs

No two things go together quite like moonshine and a big jug. Moonshine jugs have become a status symbol for moonshiners all around the world. However, how did they come to be? Moonshine jars are frequently referred to as a sign of moonshine production. Moonshine has a special place in the hearts of many people in the United States. Fermentation has been around almost as long as human history. As a matter of fact, it is speculated that humans developed to be able to digest ethanol, which enabled us to ingest fruit that had begun to spoil.

Not only did it perhaps aid in the survival of many early individuals, but it also exposed them to the effects of alcohol for the first time.

Early American Moonshine

Early American settlers used moonshine to reduce waste and improve the value of their harvests, which helped them avoid famine. To be honest, you might argue that moonshine is even more uniquely American than apple pie! Early American settlers, particularly those in grain-producing areas, used leftover grain to distill as a method of decreasing waste and boosting their earnings while still living off the land. It didn’t take long for early pioneers to discover that whiskey was far more valuable than the maize that was used to make it, and that they had made a mistake.

In fact, at one point, moonshine was used as a sort of currency.

What is Whiskey Tax?

Due to the fact that the American Revolutionary War was destined to alter the course of the United States’ destiny, it also had an impact on the use of alcoholic beverages in the future United States. Because of the Revolutionary War, rum distribution was disrupted, and beer soured more quickly than spirits and was more difficult to carry. All of these reasons contributed to an increase in the use of whiskey. A ‘whiskey tax’ was imposed by the newly created federal government. The “whiskey tax” was enacted in 1791 as a means of recouping the costs of a war that had occurred.

However, because of the surge in the use of whiskey, this levy rapidly became known as the “whisky tax,” even though it was originally applied to all domestic spirits.

The Whiskey Rebellion

Farmers living in the Western froniter, who had spent many years distilling their extra grain for profit or trade, were fiercely opposed to the levy. Farmers used intimidation and violence to get around paying the levy in the beginning phases of the uprising. The tensions reached a boiling point in July 1794, when a United States marshal was dispatched to western Pennsylvania in order to serve writs to distillers who had failed to pay their unpaid taxes on time. Over 500 armed men stormed the residence of home inspector general John Neville as soon as the news got out.

The rebels had all returned home long before the 13,000 militia arrived, allowing for a peaceful resolution to be achieved. In spite of the difficulties in collecting the whiskey tax, it was finally repealed in the early 1800s, under the Jefferson administration.

The History of Moonshine Jugs

While moonshine jugs are not the only technique to store moonshine, they are frequently connected with the phenomenon known as ‘white lightning.’ Moonshine has traditionally been stored in stoneware jugs, which are also known as liquor crocks or jugs, whiskey jugs, and shoulder jugs, among other names. While these types of jugs are not primarily used for keeping moonshine, they are inextricably related to the practice of storing spirits in general. This collection of antique whisky jugs is free of dangerous chemicals and lead.

These vintage whiskey jars are suitable for both drinking and storing water, soda, fruit juice, fermented tea, and liquor in a safe manner.

To help you make an educated purchasing decision, we’ve analyzed the top antique moonshine jugs available on the market today in this post.

Why are Old Moonshine Jugs Marked XXX?

The majority of people have only seen moonshine jugs in cartoons or caricatures, but we all know what they look like: an antique jug stamped with the letter XXX that is generally filled with moonshine. The XXX symbol relates solely to the distillation process of moonshine and has nothing to do with indicating that the product may be poisonous. Historically, the XXX sign was employed by moonshiners to indicate that their brew had been passed through the still three times, indicating to purchasers that it contained high levels of alcohol and was pure.

The following runs were used to purify the moonshine, enhancing its strength and purity as a result of the process.

Review of the Best Old Moonshine Jug For Sale

  • Construction that is long-lasting
  • The dish is safe to use in the dishwasher and microwave. Stick-resistance and non-absorbency are important characteristics. a cork stopper that is built to last

Be merry like the peasants of old, when the’shiners’ were regarded as the toast of the town. Using this Old Fashioned Stoneware Jug Growler as a drinking vessel is a one-of-a-kind and traditional experience. Any beverage you like to serve in this stoneware bottle will be safe to consume because it is made of food-grade stoneware and is durable. This jug can hold up to 64 ounces of liquid, including water, whiskey, beer, and other beverages. In addition, you may be confident that the cork stopper that comes with it will assist in keeping unwanted guests out.

Taking a sip from this moonshine jug will make you feel right at home, thanks to its brown and beige color scheme that gives it a warm and inviting atmosphere.

It is the Ohio Stoneware Old Fashioned Stoneware Jug Growler that you are seeking for if you are looking for a genuine stoneware moonshine jug that tastes as authentic as apple pie and is as American as apple pie.

Circleware O67052 Moonshine Glass Growler Jug

  • Free of polycarbonate, PVC, phthalate, and BPA
  • Non-toxic
  • Design that is both elegant and functional. Maintains and displays taste in the manner intended
  • Made of transparent glass

No polycarbonate, PVC, phthalate, or bisphenol A (BPA); It has a sophisticated appearance. Taste is preserved and presented just how it should be. Glass is used in its construction.

Packaging For You 375 ml Moonshine Jug Glass Bottle

  • Glass that is free of BPA
  • Container that is 100 percent recyclable
  • Designed with straight body panels, it is ideal for label manufacture and silk screen decoration. Handle with an one finger pistol grip
  • Container that is transparent to allow for best product presentation

The Packaging Is 375 mL for Your Convenience The Moonshine Jug Glass Bottle is a top-of-the-line jug with a classic style that can be used for a variety of liquid items. This moonshine jug features a typical spirits contour with a pistol handle that allows for one-finger carrying convenience. The jug’s substantial base gives it a strong presence on the shelf while also conveying a feeling of quality. The tall neck of this container features a blunt bar-top neck with a neck opening of 18.5mm, which is a standard size.

This jug, which is ideal for spirit drinks and liqueurs, may be utilized in a variety of applications and markets.

Packaging For You 750 ml Moonshine Jug Glass Bottle

  • The shape of the spirits container is timeless
  • The stoppers are synthetic cork. Handle with a thin neck that has been molded

This 750 mL heavyweight round moonshine jug is perfect for liquors and may assist to bring that extra touch of flair you’ve been seeking for to your bar or restaurant. If you want to go a step further, you can transform it into a stunning center piece by adding a floral arrangement and engraving an important statement on it. This jug has a molded handle and a thin neck, which helps to create a traditional appearance for the piece. The cork stoppers that are suitable with the moonshine provide a secure seal, protecting the tastes of the moonshine.

Adding these clear glass moonshine jugs to your liquor bottles collection will give your collection a vintage feel.

Thousand Oaks Barrel ‘Whiskey’ Engraved Moonshine Jug

  • Made of hand blown glass
  • Holds up to 725 milliliters of liquid
  • Jug has an engraved design
  • Finger-hook handle

With the Thousand Oaks Barrel ‘Whiskey’ Engraved Moonshine Jug, you can add a rustic touch to your backwoods cabin or country-western decor. This finger-hook liquor jug, which has been glazed and painted in caramel on the top and beige on the bottom, makes an outstanding vase. This jug, which has a wide-mouth opening, is well-constructed and well-finished, and it can contain a variety of drinks and other liquids. Because the cork stopper is quite resilient, it will stand up well to repeated usage.

The use of this classic style porcelain jug with a finger hook handle will bring a sense of whimsy to any theme party or lodge gathering.

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