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What Happened To The Hatfields/mccoys Moonshine Show On The History Channel? (Solved)

  • Authorities soon apprehended the McCoys, but the Hatfields interceded, spiriting the men to Hatfield territory. After receiving word that Ellison had died, they bound the McCoys to some pawpaw bushes. Within minutes, they fired more than 50 shots, killing all three brothers.

Contents

Is there a documentary about the Hatfields and McCoys?

HATFIELDS & MCCOYS: AN AMERICAN FEUD journeys to the rugged Appalachians for the true story of the most famous feud in American history.

What channel is the Hatfields and McCoys on?

Hatfields & McCoys Full Episodes, Video & More | HISTORY Channel.

Are there any living descendants of the Hatfields or McCoys?

Ron McCoy and Reo Hatfield are both descendants of the famous feuding Hatfields and McCoys. They will be among descendants visiting Pikeville next week for Hatfield and McCoy Heritage Days.

Is there still a feud between the Hatfields and McCoys?

The actual fighting between the Hatfields and McCoys has been long over. Although they ended the feud in 1891 and shook hands in 1976, Saturday, June 14, 2003, marked the official end to the Hatfields and McCoys’ feud when the families signed a truce, in an event broadcast by the The Saturday Early Show.

Is the Hatfield and McCoys a true story?

The Hatfields of West Virginia were led by William Anderson “Devil Anse” Hatfield, while the McCoys of Kentucky were under the leadership of Randolph “Ole Ran’l” McCoy. Those involved in the feud were descended from Joseph Hatfield and William McCoy (born c. 1750).

How many episodes of Hatfields and McCoys are there?

Sadly, the producers of the recent History Channel hit mini-series “Hatfields & McCoys” elected to shoot the quintessentially American story, which happened on the borders of West Virginia and Kentucky, in Romania.

Is the Hatfield and McCoys on Netflix?

Sorry, Hatfields & McCoys: Season 1 is not available on American Netflix, but you can unlock it right now in the USA and start watching! With a few simple steps you can change your Netflix region to a country like Canada and start watching Canadian Netflix, which includes Hatfields & McCoys: Season 1.

How long is Hatfield and Mccoy show?

The show is just over 2 hours, they have a brief intermission halfway thru the show.

How much land did the Mccoys own?

Sally inherited land from her father a few years after they married. They settled on this 300-acre spread in Pike County, Kentucky, where they had 16 children together.

How much land do the Hatfields own today?

The 5000+ acres on Grapevine Creek equals about 8 square miles. However, if we look at the deed book grantee indexes for Logan County, for the time period 1865-1892, we can roughly figure that Devil Anse and the Hatfield family owned or controlled approximately 17,600 acres, or nearly 28 square miles of land.

Who was Devil Anse Hatfield parents?

William Anderson Hatfield was born in Logan, Virginia (now Logan, West Virginia), the son of Ephraim Hatfield, of English descent, and Nancy Vance, of Ulster Scots descent. He ran a successful logging operation, and was considered wealthy for his times.

What happened to Sarah McCoy?

(Reverse) Sally McCoy contracted measles and pneumonia, and died a few months after her birth. The death of Roseanna McCoy’s only child, Sally, was a contributing factor in the grief and sorrow that led to the untimely death of Roseanna. Sally was laid to rest in the cemetery at top of hill.

Did a Hatfield ever marry a McCoy?

Johnse Hatfield, who would be married four times in his life, met Nancy McCoy (the daughter of Asa Harmon McCoy, who had been killed by the Hatfields) and they were married on May 14, 1881.

Who was better Hatfields or McCoys?

The Hatfields won the contest. 3. The formerly feuding families were featured in Life magazine in the 1940s. In May 1944, an issue of Life magazine revisited the Hatfields and McCoys nearly 50 years after violence among them rocked the Tug Valley area between Kentucky and West Virginia.

History Netherlands

Moonshining is not against the law, but you must obtain the necessary permits in order to do so legally. For the most part, home distilling is governed by two sets of laws in any given location: federal legislation and state/local legislation. Our focus here will be on federal laws because they are the ones that govern the whole country, but we strongly advise you to do your own study and to follow the laws that apply to you personally. Frommoonshinedistiller.com

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Rick, Marty, and the rest of the Oak Island team have returned, armed with more resources, tools, and technology than they have ever used in their quest to bring down the 224-year-old schatmysterie. From the 27th of December to the 22nd of December at 21:25 uur

Ancient Aliens 13: Top 10

The History Channel is not a part of this world. It is a long-term, world-wide search for evidence that there is life outside of civilization and that these previously unknown life-forms have been discovered in the aarde hundreds of years before the present. It is every Tuesday at 21.25 o’clock.

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It is now time to offer! Storage Wars is releasing a slew of brand new deliveries. Every Monday through Friday from 20.30 hrs.

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When Big Things Go Wrong investigates the cataclysmic consequences of some of the world’s most technologically advanced ramps, some of which have been captured on camera. A barstensvol with out-of-the-way, vermakelijke, and baanbrekende stories and characters: inspired by yesterday, written yesterday, and scheduled for tomorrow. HISTORY WAS RUINED! In the United Kingdom, A + E Networks has a portfolio of entertainment channels that are based on eersteklas op feiten and are owned by A + E Networks.

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We are now collaborating with more than 360 partners who are implementing our programs throughout the Scandinavian countries, the Benelux, Central Europe, the Middle East, Africa, and the Rest of the World. We have offices in London, Warsaw, and Johannesburg, among other places.

“Hatfields & McCoys: White Lightning” is Television at its Worst

MediaTelevision “HatfieldsMcCoys: White Lightning” is a prime example of bad television. It happens every now and then that someone creates a “reality” show that millions of people are interested in and love watching, such as Duck Dynasty. No matter how you feel about the program, it is unquestionably a tremendous success for A E. No matter how you feel about the show, it is certainly a huge success for A E. On top of that, there is this abomination on the History Channel, or the Alien Channel, or whatever.

  • With their latest “reality” series, HatfieldsMcCoys: White Lightning, History has taken the ridiculous to a whole new level.
  • The principle is straightforward.
  • Louis have expressed an interest in investing in their long-standing family legacy of moonshine production.
  • White Lightnin’, as the song goes.

Tug Valley, where the descendants of the infamous HatfieldMcCoy families had their little disagreement many years ago, is still alive with the continuation of family traditions such as a-hunting squirrels, choppin’ far-wood, sleeping with their sisters, outwitting Boss Hog and Roscoe at the Boar’s nest, and, according to reports, making moonshine.

A man of ordinary intellect, on the other hand, does not appear to be employed by History Channel.

The entire thing is desperately attempting to be like Duck Dynasty, but it is not.

  1. Suspicious of this suave, big-city investor
  2. Still battling over something that happened more than 100 years ago
  3. Still marrying relatives
  4. Absurd as clown dung
  5. And so forth.

At the same time as History’s enormously successful and incredibly well done mini series, “HatfieldsMcCoys,” this show is clearly a money grab that intends to piggyback on the popularity of that truly enjoyable and well written series, which is an absolute crying damn pity. The miniseries was probably as historically accurate as it was possible to make it, and it included an all-star ensemble that upped the level of credibility and entertainment to the point where it could have been a tremendous box office success if it had been released theatrically.

Because you’re witnessing the history of American television fall right down the toilet while watching this program, it’s really the only connection to the past that this show can genuinely claim.

This is a heinous crime against humanity. Listed below are three reasons why this entire series is a load of bullshit:

1) It’s from History Channel

At the same time as History’s enormously successful and highly well done mini series, “HatfieldsMcCoys,” this show is clearly a money grab that intends to piggyback on the popularity of the truly enjoyable and well written series, which is a crying damn pity. The miniseries was probably as historically accurate as it was possible to make it, and it had an all-star cast that upped the level of plausibility and entertainment to the point where it could have been a tremendous box office blockbuster if it had been released theatrically instead.

Because you’re witnessing the history of American television fall right down the toilet while watching this program, it’s really the only connection to the past that this show can claim.

For starters, here are three reasons why this entire series is complete bullshit:

2) It’s A Stupid Premise

As shown in the trailer for the episode, one family threatens the other with a hunting knife because of a perceived offense on their part. Even if it hadn’t been scripted and arranged, you’d be in trouble for that nonsense. If nothing else, they would be charged with harassing or endangering others. Whether they’re hill-folk or not, it’s quite unlikely that they’d fall for a knife threat. One entire play is nothing more than a very sophisticated (and exceedingly idiotic) advertising for this particular alcoholic beverage.

This isn’t for the sake of the families, but rather for the benefit of HatfieldMcCoy Moonshine, LLC.

Whatever, it doesn’t matter because West Virginia approved moonshine distilling in 2002.

3) The Feud’s Been Over Since 1900

Two of history’s most famed families are still holding a life-or-death grudge against one another for wrongdoings that occurred more than a century ago, and the plot of this drama revolves on that notion. While it makes for a good movie, with a few folk tales thrown in for good measure, it isn’t based on actual historical events. Take a look at what we discovered here. Hatfields and McCoys must put their differences aside — but not in each other. It appears that the families eventually decided to put their long-running, ludicrous quarrel to rest in June of 2000, when they finally agreed to let bygones be bygones.

You might be interested:  Why Do They Shake The Jar Of Moonshine?

In accordance with the families…

It was the McCoys who initiated the first peace proposal.

History Channel, you’ve done nothing for me.

Hatfields & McCoys (miniseries) – Wikipedia

HatfieldsMcCoys
Poster
Genre Docudrama
Screenplay by Ted MannRonald Parker
Story by Bill KerbyTed Mann
Directed by Kevin Reynolds
Starring
  • Kevin Costner, Bill Paxton, Tom Berenger, and Powers Boothe are among the cast members.
Theme music composer John DebneyTony Morales
Country of origin United States
Original language English
No.of episodes 3
Production
Producers Kevin CostnerDarrell Fetty Herb Nanas
Cinematography Arthur Reinhart
Editor Don Cassidy
Running time 290 minutes
Production companies HistoryThinkFactory MediaSony Pictures Television
Release
Original network History
Original release May 28 – May 30, 2012
External links
Website

History Channel aired a three-part Western television miniseries based on the Hatfield–McCoy dispute in 2012, which was titled HatfieldsMcCoys in the United States.

A total of three two-hour programs were shown on May 28, 29, and 30.

Cast and characters

The miniseries was History’s first written drama to be shown on television (the network had previously produced a scripted miniseries in 2011,The Kennedys, but decided against airing it in the United States). Despite the fact that the plot takes place in the Appalachian Mountains of West Virginia and Kentucky, the miniseries was filmed in Romania, just outside of Braşov, with the Carpathians standing in for the Appalachians in the final episode.

Music

The series’ score was created by John Debney and Tony Morales, with additional music by Kevin Costner and Modern West, who also appeared in the series. The Long Road Down contains vocals by Lisbeth Scott, who also appears on the album’s soundtrack.

Reception

Currently, the series has a 71 percent approval rating on Rotten Tomatoes, which is based on 24 reviews with an average rating of 7.34 out of 10. The critical consensus on the site goes as follows: “Hatfields and McCoysis a violent and gritty spectacle that perhaps takes itself a little too seriously.” A weighted average score of 68 out of 100 is given to the film on Metacritic based on 20 reviews, suggesting that it has received “generally acceptable reviews.” In the words of Linda Stasi of the New York Post, “When I first heard about it, my immediate instinct was, “Why?” But that was before I went through the entire six-hour marathon of this gripping story.

Most miniseries of this length tend to lose their momentum halfway between the beginning of Night 1 and the middle of Night 2 of the first season.

The miniseries is chock-full of standout performances by a diverse group of talented performers.

Ken Tucker of Entertainment Weekly awarded the series a B+ rating, writing that: “Because the story is told across three evenings, the pacing might become sluggish at times, and the recriminations can become repetitious.

However, HatfieldsMcCoysis a compelling and educational read about a conflict that shows to be much more than a bumpkin battle between two music legends in general.” HatfieldsMcCoys, according to Mary McNamara of the Los Angeles Times, “deftly nails itself into its time and place with sets and costumes so vivid you can smell the blue wood smoke and the smell of moonshine sweat,” “transcends the confines of its age by revealing the feud’s posturing, resentments, and callous violence that mirror the dynamics of modern urban gangs.” There are flaws in the work; for example, when presented with a decision between historical information and tale, HatfieldsMcCoyserrs on the side of historical detail, which is both the series’ greatest strength and its biggest weakness.

There were a number of unfavorable commentators, including HatfieldsMcCoys was panned by Newsday’s Verne Gay, who described the series as “violent and uninteresting,” but added, “What’s not to enjoy aboutHatfieldsMcCoys?” It’s as simple as the narrative.

As shown here—and very probably accurately—they’re a bunch of knuckleheads that fire at each other year after year (or on television, hour after hour) with no apparent reason for doing so.

A bad review was also given by Hank Stuever of the Washington Post: “The purpose of the entire narrative, it appears, is to make you lose sight of what the feudin’ was about, and how it managed to flame out of control.” It will always be tempting to examine their narrative through the lens of any contemporary comparison of one’s choosing—such as party political impasses or the red-blue socioeconomic divide—but this will never be a productive approach.

However, it is possible that the narrative of the Hatfields and McCoys is completely insignificant. Perhaps, given how little it contributes to the miniseries, it was intended to be only a footnote and nothing more.

Accolades

A total of 16 nominations for Hatfields and McCoys were given out at the 64th Primetime Emmy Awards, which is a record number of nominees since the History Channel began broadcasting. The series was nominated for an Emmy in the category of Outstanding Miniseries or Movie. Kevin Costner and Bill Paxton were both nominated for the award forOutstanding Lead Actor in a Miniseries or Movie, with Costner taking home the prize. Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Miniseries or Movie was given to Tom Berenger, while Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Miniseries or Movie went to Mare Winningham, who was nominated.

A nomination forOutstanding Writing for a Miniseries, Movie, or Dramatic Special was made for the second installment of the miniseries, which was written by Ted Mann, Ronald Parker, and Bill Kerby.

Award Category Nominee Result
2nd Critics’ Choice Television Awards Best Movie/Miniseries Actor Kevin Costner Nominated
17th Satellite Awards Best Miniseries or Television Film Won
Best Actor in a Miniseries or Television Film Kevin Costner Nominated
Best Supporting Actress in a Series, Miniseries, or Television Film Mare Winningham Nominated
19th Screen Actors Guild Awards Outstanding Performance by a Male Actor in a Miniseries or Television Movie Kevin Costner Won
Bill Paxton Nominated
28th TCA Awards Outstanding Achievement in Movies, Miniseries, and Specials Nominated
64th Primetime Emmy Awards Outstanding Miniseries or Movie Barry M. Berg,Kevin Costner, Herb Nanas, Vlad Paunescu,Nancy Dubuc, Dirk Hoogstra, Leslie Greif, and Darrell Fetty Nominated
Outstanding Lead Actor in a Miniseries or Movie Kevin Costner Won
Bill Paxton Nominated
Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Miniseries or Movie Tom Berenger Won
Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Miniseries or Movie Mare Winningham Nominated
Outstanding Directing for a Miniseries, Movie, or Dramatic Special Kevin Reynolds Nominated
Outstanding Writing for a Miniseries, Movie, or Dramatic Special Bill KerbyTed MannRonald Parkerfor “Part 2” Nominated
64th Primetime Creative Arts Emmy Awards Outstanding Art Direction for a Miniseries, Movie or a Special Serban Porupca, Derek R. Hill, John B. Vertrees, and Sally Black Nominated
Outstanding Casting for a Miniseries, Movie, or Special Fern Champion and Amy Hubbard Nominated
Outstanding Costumes for a Miniseries, Movie, or Special Karri Hutchinson and Adina Bucur for “Part 2” Nominated
Outstanding Hairstyling for a Miniseries, Movie or a Special Gabriele Gregorini, Peter Nicastro, and Giorgio Gregorini Nominated
Outstanding Makeup for a Miniseries, Movie or a Special (Non-Prosthetic) Francesca Tampieri and Mario Michisanti Won
Outstanding Music Composition for a Miniseries, Movie, or Special (Original Dramatic Score) John Debneyand Tony Morales for “Part 1” Nominated
Outstanding Single-Camera Picture Editing for a Miniseries, Movie or a Special Don Cassidy for “Part 2” Won
Outstanding Sound Editing for a Miniseries, Movie, or Special Tom Bjelic, John Laing, Darrell Hall, Steve Baine, Michael Mancuso, Dermain Finlayson, Dan Kiener, Kevin Banks, Emilie Boucek, Mark Dejczak, Alex Bullick,John Douglas Smith, and Nathan Robitaille for “Part 1” Nominated
Outstanding Single-Camera Sound Mixing for a Miniseries or a Movie Christian T. Cooke,Brad Zoern, Stanomir Dragos, and for “Part 1” Won
70th Golden Globe Awards Best Miniseries or Television Film Nominated
Best Actor – Miniseries or Television Film Kevin Costner Won

Ratings

A total of 16 nominations for Hatfields and McCoys were given out at the 64th Primetime Emmy Awards, which is a record number for the History Channel since the channel began broadcasting. A nomination for Outstanding Miniseries or Movie was given to the series. Costner and Paxton were both nominated for the award forOutstanding Lead Actor in a Miniseries or Movie, with Costner taking home the trophy. Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Miniseries or Movie was given to Tom Berenger, while Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Miniseries or Movie went to Mare Winningham, who was nominated for both awards.

A nomination forOutstanding Writing for a Miniseries, Movie, or Dramatic Special was made for the second installment of the miniseries, which was written by Ted Mann, Ronald Parker, and Bill Kerby, among others.

Effect on tourism

As reported by WYMT-TV in Hazard, Kentucky, the television series has resulted in an increase in tourism to the region as a result of people seeking to learn more about the dispute. Reed Potter, Vice Chair of the Pike County Tourism Commission, stated, “It has exceeded our expectations.” We’ve been getting requests for booklets that explain visitors about the feud sites and places they can visit at a rate of around two per minute today, according to the last time I looked.

Home video release

On July 31, 2012, the series was made available on DVD and Blu-ray Disc formats. There is also a music video for “I Know These Hills” by Kevin Costner and Modern West from their albumFamous for Killing Each Other: Music From and Inspired By HatfieldsMcCoys, which can be found in the supplementary material.

References

  1. Ab”HatfieldsMcCoys.”History. May 24, 2012. ab”HatfieldsMcCoys.”History. May 24, 2012. The original version of this article was archived on May 28, 2012. Carol Emmott, Carol Emmott, Carol Emmott, Carol Emmott (May 24, 2012). “With ‘HatfieldsMcCoys,’ history comes to life on the big screen.” According to USA Today. The original version of this article was archived on May 28, 2012. Obtainable on May 28, 2012
  2. Matthew Belloni’s name is Belloni (January 7, 2010). History Channel has pulled the controversial miniseries ‘The Kennedys,’ claiming that it was “not a good fit.” According to The Hollywood Reporter. The original version of this article was published on January 8, 2011. 7th of January, 2010
  3. Retrieved 7th of January, 2010
  4. In the words of HatfieldsMcCoys, “Romania becomes Appalachia.” The History Channel is a television network that broadcasts historical information. The original version of this article was archived on October 26, 2012. “Interview with Kevin Costner on the set of ‘Hatfields and McCoys’ in Romania,” which was retrieved on June 21, 2012. The original version of this article was archived on May 24, 2012. On June 21, 2012, the website Rotten Tomatoes published “Hatfield and McCoys: Season 1 (2010)”. Fandango Media is a media company based in Los Angeles. Metacritic has a review of “HatfieldsMcCoys” that was published on May 10, 2020. The original version of this article was archived on May 30, 2012. 2012-05-28
  5. Stasi, Linda (May 27, 2012). Retrieved 2012-05-28 “Neighbors should be despised. “HatfieldsMcCoys” is not a hillbilly prank.” “The New York Post published an article on May 29, 2012, which was subsequently archived. Obtainable on May 31, 2012
  6. Ken Tucker’s e-mail address is [email protected] (May 25, 2012). In 2012, Entertainment Weekly published a review of the show Hatfields & McCoys. The original version of this article was archived on May 31, 2012. McNamara, Mary (May 31, 2012)
  7. Retrieved May 31, 2012. (May 28, 2012). “HatfieldsMcCoys’ has rich detail and excellent performance,” according to the review. The Los Angeles Times published this article. The original version of this article was archived on May 31, 2012. Obtainable on May 31, 2012
  8. Gay, Verne (May 25, 2012). This is a tame war between the Hatfields and the McCoys,” says the author. Newsday. The original version of this article was archived on May 31, 2012. Stuever, Hank (May 25, 2012). ” ” HatfieldsMcCoys”: Brawlers in the Holler”. Retrieved May 31, 2012. According to the Washington Post. The original version of this article was archived on May 31, 2012. Braxton, Greg (May 31, 2012)
  9. Retrieved May 31, 2012. (July 19, 2012). “The ‘HatfieldsMcCoys’ rivalry garners 16 nominations for the Emmys.” The Los Angeles Times published this article. The original version of this article was archived on July 20, 2012. “HatfieldsMcCoys – Emmys” was retrieved on July 20, 2012 from www.emmys.com. From the original on July 22, 2012, and retrieved on July 20, 2012, “‘Game of Thrones’ top creative arts Emmy winner” was announced. The Denver Post is a newspaper in Colorado. According to the Associated Press. The 15th of September, 2012. Hatfields and McCoys makes history on the History Channel, according to Rick Porter (29 May 2012). Zap2it.com. The original version of this article was published on May 30, 2012. Bibel, Sara (May 30, 2012)
  10. Retrieved 30 May 2012. (May 31, 2012). On Tuesday, cable ratings showed that “Hatfields&McCoys” took home the night, as well as “NBA Playoffs,” “Tosh.0,” “The Deadliest Catch,” “Workaholics,” “Real Housewives,” and “Tosh.0.” The Television by the Numbers. On June 1, 2012, the original version of this article was archived. Bibel, Sara (May 31, 2012)
  11. Retrieved May 31, 2012. (May 31, 2012). More from the article “Wednesday Cable Ratings: ‘HatfieldsMcCoys’ Wins Night
  12. NBA Playoffs
  13. ‘Hardcore History
  14. ‘Restaurant Impossible
  15. ‘MelissaJoey
  16. The Daily Show
  17. More”. The Television by the Numbers. Burks, Whitney (June 3, 2012)
  18. Archived from the original on May 31, 2012
  19. Retrieved May 31, 2012. (May 31, 2012). “After the Hatfield-McCoy mini-series, tourism has increased.” WYMT-TV. David Lambert’s retrieved on June 1, 2012
  20. Lambert, David (June 1, 2012). Sony’s official press release for the recently aired History Channel miniseries “Hatfields and McCoys” may be seen at the link above. TVShowsOnDVD.com. On June 4, 2012, the original version of this article was archived. On June 8, 2012, I was able to retrieve

External links

  • The McCoys’ official website
  • The McCoys’ Origins Barry McCoy is an author, historian of the Hatfield-McCoy feud, and the official spokesperson for the McCoy family. The McCoys: A Family History IMDb has a page dedicated to the Hatfield-McCoy conflict
  • A TV series based on the Hatfield-McCoy feud strives for historical authenticity.

‘White Lightning’ – Let’s Make a Feud

The image is courtesy of the History Channel. “HatfieldsMcCoys: White Lightning” stars a cast of actors from the television program. The “reality” program creates a fresh cause for the mountain families to socialize, and the mountain families are delighted. Different parts of the nation appear to be targeted by pop culture on a rotating basis. New Jersey had its time in the spotlight, and now, thanks to shows like “Honey Boo Boo” and “Duck Dynasty,” the South is having its turn in the spotlight.

To coincide with West Virginia’s sesquicentennial celebrations, the History Channel premiered a new series on the ancestors of the Hatfields and the McCoys, two families that lived on the border between West Virginia and Kentucky during the American Revolution.

As represented by the figures of “Devil” Anse Hatfield and Randolph McCoy, West Virginia is shown as more “wild wild West” than “wild and magnificent.” Two warring families, a Romeo and Juliet-like love story, great brutality, and the lack of judicial collaboration between two states in the aftermath of the Civil War are all shown in the Hatfield-McCoy saga.

  1. The History Channel, on the other hand, clearly does not.
  2. A liquor businessman from St.
  3. The formula for moonshine from the original, feuding Hatfield and McCoy families, according to a liquor industry executive, would be great to utilize.
  4. According to what the show’s producers would have you think, the opportunity to legally create moonshine has revived the Hatfield-McCoy animosity between the two brothers.
  5. The History Channel is one of them.
  6. To be honest, I’m a little embarrassed to admit that I sat for a complete episode of 21 minutes.

I was left wondering if the producers had ever spent any time in an Appalachian setting other than a comic strip, given the appearance in a single episode of a turkey hunt, cursing matriarchs, donkeys and pigs in a house, moonshine recipes in the back of the family Bible, alcoholic cousins, a jug band, and a hoedown.

  1. Even while I’m confident that all of the events described have occurred at some point or another throughout West Virginia or Kentucky, you’re more likely to see theMothman at Sunday school than you are to witness all of these cliches in the same spot.
  2. In the end, it matters that this display is removing a piece of West Virginia’s history from its historical setting.
  3. The outsider takes advantage of the labor and natural resources of Appalachia, acting as though it will bring a lot of money to the region.
  4. Despite the fact that the show is about moonshine, it is evident that the resource being used is one with a violent history.
  5. As with “Buckwild,” it’s easy to feel enraged by the individuals that appear on this show if you’re from the Appalachian mountains.
  6. Do you have children in your family?
  7. Nonetheless, implying that the cast of “White Lightning” is being utilized by the History Channel implies a negative stereotype of people from Appalachia, which I find almost equally upsetting as having my home state portrayed by a television program about feuding and moonshining.
  8. We, as media consumers, are guilty of this.
  9. It allows us to gawk in the privacy of our own homes, free from the customary social restraints that might otherwise influence our conduct.

Even though no one wants to be present when someone draws a knife in a fight, it’s something that we would be interested in seeing on “White Lightning.” As a result, instead of discussing how it would be fascinating to witness individuals with Appalachian accents fighting, may we instead discuss the human tendency to take secret pleasure in the hardships and suffering of others?

Don’t waste your time watching reality programs that devalue local history.

Take a sip of your own homemade booze.

Find a constructive approach to vent your aggression.

Janney Lockman was born and raised in West Virginia. It was for the Daily Yonder that she wrote her most recent piece, which was on the television show “Buckwild.”

Watch Hatfields & McCoys: White Lightning Season 1

Season year2013NetworkA E Television Networks A E Television Networks Purchase of ownership rights Streaming immediatelyDetails Devices that support Prime Video (streaming internet video) Watchable on devices that are compatible with it

  1. Sixty-one percent of reviews are five stars, while just 22 percent of reviews are four stars Six percent of reviews are rated three stars, while six percent are rated two stars. One-star ratings account for 6% of all reviews.

Create a testimonial for a customer. The best reviews have come from the United States. Reviewer Who Remains Silent On September 15, 2013, a 5.0 out of 5 star rating was given in the United States. This is classic family feuding at its finest! Purchase has been verified A number of aspects of this presentation appeal to me as a genealogy and history enthusiast. ‘The Trials and Tribulations of the Hatfield and McCoy Clans’ follows two portions of the historic Hatfield and McCoy clans as they attempt to collaborate long enough to make a new brand of (now legalized) moonshine and, presumably, capitalize on the reputation of their century-old rivalry The clans are led by Mark Hatfield and Jim McCoy, who serve as their leaders.

  • Oh, plus they have a VERY STRONG sense of entitlement;-) It makes for entertaining viewing.
  • I think Scottie May Hatfield is the most appealing of the characters on the program, in my view.
  • He makes poor judgments because of his obsession with the “product,” and he continuously laments his inability to meet a suitable lady because of his obsession with the “product.” He’s fantastic, and his canine companion is adorable as well!
  • Oh my goodness, those two old ladies have such much energy and zest for life!
  • In addition to being amusing, this program may sneak in a little of history if you aren’t paying attention to what they are doing.
  • The Old Lady, as she is affectionately known On May 4, 2014, a 4.0 out of 5 star rating was given in the United States.
  • Purchase has been verified After viewing the first episode, it appears to be a scripted production.

2) The Hatfield and McCoy residences appear to be either overly immaculate or museums, depending on your perspective.

It was a nice touch.

I’ve seen other “hillbilly” programs, such as Appalachian Outlaws and Mountain Men, and they all appear to be quite authentic.

It is, nevertheless, entertaining.

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3.0 stars out of 5 for this product Providing Evidence to Support the Myth Purchase has been verified Since I am closely related to both of these families and am intimately familiar with this beloved region, I primarily watch to take in the scenery and accents, which I find enjoyable.

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In the United States, on February 19, 2014, TJ was reviewed.

Love the show though, it was fantastic, and I’m hoping that there will be a season two in the works, because I can’t wait to see what happens.

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It appears that I will be purchasing movies and television shows from Google Play. caleb On April 27, 2016, a 1.0 out of 5 star rating was given in the United States. Purchase made under false pretenses Just a bunch of fabricated drama with no basis in reality. See all of the reviews

Hatfield and McCoy: What you didn’t know about the real-life murderous families

The reality may be stranger than fiction on sometimes, and this is certainly true in the case of the Hatfields and the McCoys family. You may have heard about the infamous Hatfield-McCoy family rivalry at some point in your life. It’s possible that you’ve seen the dinner show in Pigeon Forge, Tennessee. A real-life narrative of kidnapped pigs, furious retribution, and horrible massacres lurks beneath the surface of the slap-stick humor and musical performances. During this narrative, we’ll go back to 1863, during the height of the American Civil War.

The family’s progenitor was William Anderson “Devil Anse” Hatfield, who lived in the early 1900s.

The McCoys were a family who resided on the other side of the river.

Randolph “Ole Ran’l” McCoy was the family patriarch and was known as “Ole Ran’l.” With the exception of Asa Harmon McCoy, both families fought for the Confederacy during the Civil War, which is where our narrative begins.

The first sign of trouble: The Hatfields are accused of Asa McCoy’s murder

Devil Anse was rumored to be associated with the Logan Wildcats, a Confederate infantry regiment that served in the Civil War. There are several complexities and conflicting versions around this portion of the narrative, but here is the oversimplified version: Anse’s companion had been murdered by the Union, and he desired vengeance. In the aftermath of Asa’s return from the battle, Anse and the Wildcats issue a warning, prompting Asa to go into hiding for a period of time. However, according to legend, the minute Asa emerges from hiding in 1865, he is slain.

Anse was supposedly bedridden at the time of the murder, which provided him with an alibi, according to reports.

However, until…

Randolph McCoy (on the left) and “Devil Anse” Hatfield (on the right) (pictures from the archives/public domain).

The second dispute: The famous stolen pig

Thirteen years later, in 1878, Ole Ran’l accused Floyd Hatfield, Anse’s cousin, of stealing his pig, setting off a chain reaction of events. While this may seem a little absurd now, a pig was a valuable piece of real estate and a direct source of food and revenue for his family back in the days when this occurred. The argument was taken to court, but the local judge happened to be a Hatfield, so the outcome was predictable. According to some sources, he attempted to ensure a fair trial by assembling a jury composed of half McCoys and half Hatfields.

  1. As a result, Floyd was let free, much to the displeasure of Ole Ran’l.
  2. He had to pay court expenses, which he did not enjoy doing.
  3. While some stories claim that this was the Staton who testified, others claim that this was Bill Staton, Jr.
  4. Staton or Staton Jr.

The other McCoy then shoots Staton in the head, killing him. Others claim that the two McCoy boys were acquitted on the basis of self defense, while others claim that they were sentenced to prison. Neither version is correct.

Adding fuel to the fire: The forbidden romance of Roseanna McCoy and Johnson Hatfield

Roseanna McCoy began a connection with Johnson Anse, the son of Anse’s wife, in order to stoke the fire (or Johnse, according to some sources). Roseanna is said to have abandoned her family and moved in with the Hatfields in West Virginia. She became pregnant, but Johnson didn’t want to marry her because of the pregnancy. Her family has disowned her as a result of the pregnancy, and she is now living with her aunt. Roseanna’s baby dies as a result of measles as an infant, and Johnson eventually abandons her to marry Roseanna’s cousin Nancy McCoy in 1881.

The feud dramatically escalates: Ellison Hatfield is stabbed 26 times by Ole Ran’l McCoy’s sons

Ellison Hatfield, Anse’s brother, got into a drunken brawl with three of Ole Ran’l’s sons in 1882, and was stabbed 26 times as a result. The hatred escalated swiftly (to put it mildly) after that incident. Hatfield constables apprehended and detained the three McCoys at their home. Anse secretly recruited a huge number of supporters and was able to apprehend the McCoys before they were brought to trial. Anse stated that if Ellison did not die, he would release them from their obligations. At the end of the day, Ellison died as a result of his injuries, and the Hatfields tied the three boys to trees and shrubs and shot them at least fifty times to complete their execution.

Bounties placed on 20 members of the Hatfield clan

This is where a man by the name of Perry Cline enters the picture to play a role. Cline, who was married to a McCoy, had already lost 5,000 acres of land to the Hatfields in a legal battle with the Hatfields. According to reports, he was found guilty of cutting timber from Anse’s land and therefore lost his claim to this land in court. Some sources claim that he was duped out of his 5,000 acres, but other reports contend that he was right in doing so. In any case, Cline was an attorney out for revenge, and he used the recent execution of the McCoy brothers as a chance to contact the governor of Kentucky about the Hatfields, leading to the imposition of bounties on 20 members of the Hatfield family.

The principal bounty hunter was a guy by the name of “Mad” Frank Phillips, who made it his personal mission to transport as many Hatfields as he possibly could over the river.

At this stage, the conflict was receiving widespread coverage in the media.

According to reports, the two governors stood toe-to-toe, preparing to send soldiers over to conquer the adjacent state.

The climax: The New Year’s Night Massacre

This is when the character of Perry Cline comes into play. In a previous case against the Hatfields, Cline, who was married to a McCoy, was awarded 5,000 acres of property. According to reports, he was found guilty of cutting timber from Anse’s land and therefore forfeited this land in a legal proceeding. Some accounts claim that he was scammed out of his 5,000 acres, while others claim that he was right in doing so. No matter how it turned out, Cline was a vengeful attorney, and he used the recent execution of the McCoy brothers as a chance to contact the governor of Kentucky about the Hatfields — and ultimately to place bounties on 20 members of the Hatfield family.

The principal bounty hunter was a guy by the name of “Mad” Frank Phillips, who made it his personal mission to transport as many Hatfields as he possibly could over the Mississippi.

It was at this moment that the conflict began to garner news coverage.

The whole states of Kentucky and West Virginia were thrown into a state of war as a result of this incident. According to reports, the two governors stood toe-to-toe, preparing to deploy troops across the border to attack the adjacent state.

Hatfields and McCoys: Where they are now

This is where a man by the name of Perry Cline comes into play. Cline, who was married to a McCoy, had already lost 5,000 acres of land to the Hatfields in a legal battle with the family. According to reports, he was found guilty of cutting timber from Anse’s land and so forfeited his land in court. Some stories claim that he was duped out of his 5,000 acres, but other accounts claim that he was right in doing so. In any case, Cline was a vengeful attorney, and he used the recent death of the McCoy brothers as a chance to contact the governor of Kentucky about the Hatfields — and ultimately to place bounties on 20 members of the Hatfield clan.

The principal bounty hunter was a guy dubbed “Mad” Frank Phillips, who made it his personal mission to get as many Hatfields across the river as he possibly could.

At this time, the media began taking notice of the rivalry.

According to reports, the two governors stood toe-to-toe, preparing to send soldiers over to conquer their neighboring state.

The Hatfield and McCoy Dinner Feud in Pigeon Forge

The Hatfield and McCoy Dinner Feud play in Pigeon Forge, Tenn., includes a four-course meal, musical acts, dancing, and a far more light-hearted perspective on actual events than the actual events themselves. Now that you’re familiar with the background of the legendary family dispute, you can go check out the entertaining rendition and tell your friends and family about it. More information may be found at: Hatfield and McCoy: A murderous feud that evolved into a comic dinner performance is reviewed.

Please share your thoughts in the comments section!

Featured image courtesy of the Hatfield and McCoy Dinner Feud Note from the editor: There are several contradicting accounts of the real-life Hatfield and McCoy families’ tale, according to certain sources.

Disclaimer: While we make every effort to provide you with the most up-to-date information, please keep in mind that the attractions and pricing mentioned in this article may vary depending on the season and are subject to change.

The opinions stated here are solely those of the author and not those of any of the businesses mentioned, and have not been approved or sponsored by any of these organisations. If you have any questions or comments, please email us at [email protected]

FEUD FACTS: The real story of the Hatfields & McCoys

Almost no one in America can hear the name “Hatfield” without immediately conjuring up images of the character “McCoy.” Located in the Tri-State area, this most famed feud in American history took place here in our own backyard. After the History channel’s “HatfieldsMcCoys” miniseries, starring Kevin Costner and Bill Paxton, was shown in 2012, the saga has received a fresh wave of attention. In the pages of the Tri-State Visitors’ Guide, you’ll find a number of sites, events, and festivals that are associated to the feudal era.

  • Although the Hatfields of West Virginia and the McCoys of Kentucky had their origins in the Civil War, the rivalry between the two families did not end until 1981.
  • The Kentucky homeguards were called into action as a result of the attack, and they were dispatched to capture Devil Anse and his men.
  • He set a tent in a rock outcropping near his house.
  • It is thought that one of the individuals was responsible for Asa McCoy’s death.
  • In the late 1870s, Devil Anse Hatfield became embroiled in a land dispute with McCoy’s cousin Perry Cline, which led to McCoy’s death.
  • Randolph McCoy dropped in to see Floyd Hatfield, a relative of Devil Anse, a few months after the verdict was handed down.
  • In response to Hatfield’s denial, the two were brought into court with Preacher Anderson Hatfield (a Baptist preacher and justice of the peace) to resolve the lawsuit.

Randolph’s nephew Bill Staton, who is also Ellison Hatfield’s brother-in-law, declared under oath that Floyd Hatfield was the owner of the hog.

During a gunfight with Paris and Sam McCoy on June 18, 1880, Staton was slain.

Ellison Hatfield was a witness in that particular trial.

Randolph did not approve of their relationship, and they became lovers.

When she arrived, a group of McCoys rode up to the cabin, seized Johnse as a prisoner, and then rode off to the Pikeville jail.

Following then, the couple stayed apart.

Later in the year, the infant died as a result of measles.

Johnse Hatfield had previously been married four times.

With knives in hand, Tolbert’s two younger brothers, Pharmer and Randolph Jr., joined into the battle, and Pharmer McCoy was the one who shot Ellison.

In order to get some food, they stopped at Floyd McCoy’s house and decided to stay the night farther up Blackberry Creek.

The youths who had murdered Ellison were executed by Devil Anse when he crossed into Kentucky and bound them to paw paw trees, as part of a larger group of men.

The result was a gunfight that resulted in the deaths of Randolph McCoy’s daughter Alifair and son Calvin.

Randolph, his wife Sarah, and the surviving children were able to flee the scene.

He also issued a special prize, which prompted a wave of bounty hunters to pursue the Hatfields and their family.

The Battle of Grapevine Creek was a large-scale shootout between Phillips and his men and Devil Anse Hatfield and his men that took place on January 19, 1861, and is still remembered today.

Because of the incursions, West Virginia Gov.

Willis Wilson expressed his displeasure, and many people speculated that a new Civil War may erupt along the Tug Fork between groups in the two states.

In April 1888, the governor of West Virginia filed a lawsuit against the state of Kentucky for the unconstitutional detention of nine inmates, and the case was unsuccessfully appealed to the United States Supreme Court.

Elison Mounts was executed on February 18, 1890, for the shooting deaths of Alifair and Calvin McCoy, while the other of the McCoy brothers’ killers were sentenced to life in prison for their participation in the three McCoy brothers’ deaths.

The Bloody Feud of the Hatfields and McCoys – Legends of America

Every American who hears the name “Hatfield” automatically conjures up images of the character “McCoy.” Located right here in the Tri-State area, this most epic feud in American legend took place. After the History channel’s “HatfieldsMcCoys” miniseries, starring Kevin Costner and Bill Paxton, was broadcasted in 2012, the narrative has received a fresh swell of attention. Several sights, activities, and festivals relating to the conflict may be found in the Tri-State Visitors’ Guide’s sections.

Both William “Devil Anse” Hatfield and Randolph McCoy were patriarchs, and they were at the forefront of the rivalry.

In response to this raid, the Kentucky homeguards were dispatched to capture Devil Anse and his men.

A man from France, Asa Harmon McCoy (Randall’s brother), went after Anse in retaliation for the death of Randall’s brother.

Following his discovery, Anse ordered his uncle, Jim Vance, as well as Jim Wheeler Wilson (a fellow soldier), to face McCoy.

TWO COURT DECISIONSA pair of court rulings contributed to the escalation of the animosity between the two sides.

Anse prevailed in the property dispute and was awarded Cline’s whole 5,000-acre parcel of land as a result of the victory.

A hog that McCoy said had the McCoy marking on its ear was seen when he was there.

Both the Hatfields and the McCoys were on the jury panel in this case.

This lawsuit was won by Floyd and his team.

A witness for the prosecution was Ellison Hatfield.

However, Randolph was not happy with their relationship.

This was communicated to Devil Anse, who organized his own crew in order to cut off the McCoys and rescue his son from them.

It was in the spring of 1881 that Roseanna gave birth to their first child, Sarah Elizabeth McCoy.

Nancy McCoy (the daughter of Asa Harmon McCoy, who had been slain by the Hatfields) and Johnse Hatfield were married on May 14, 1881, in what would be his fourth marriage in his life.

DIFFICULTIES AT THE VOTING STATIONS Election Day was August 5, 1882, when Ellison Hatfield got into a fight with Tolbert McCoy (Randolph’s son) while voting at the polls on Blackberry Creek.

BURNS THE HATFIELDS IN REVENGE Preacher Anse Hatfield instructed constables to transport the McCoy brothers to the Pikeville prison so that they might be charged with various crimes.

As soon as Devil Anse Hatfield learned about it, he rushed on the spot the next morning with a gang of roughly 20 relatives and friends to take control of the McCoy lads.

BECOME INVOLVED: GOVERNORS It was the wee hours of New Year’s Day 1888 when a raid on the McCoy cabin took place, and the Hatfields hoped to leave no witnesses behind.

Randolph’s cottage was completely destroyed by the intruders.

Because of the murders of the McCoys, Kentucky Governor Simon Buckner dispatched special officer Frank Phillips and 38 men to apprehend the nearly 20 men responsible.

Uncle Jim Vance was slain on January 10, 1888, by Phillips, who had apprehended some of the guys involved.

Despite the fact that no one was killed during the battle, Devil Anse was compelled to acquire 25 new Winchester repeating rifles in order to prepare for possible future attacks on his fortress.

E.

Both states have instructed their National Guard battalions to prepare for the defense of their respective border regions.

If the Hatfields are convicted in Kentucky, they will have to stand trial there, regardless of whether or not Phillips’ initial arrest was legally valid.

In the case of the shooting of Alifair and Calvin McCoy, Elison Mounts was hung on February 18, 1890, and the other defendants were sentenced to life imprisonment for their participation in the deaths of Alifair and Calvin McCoy.

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