Categories Moonshine

How To Make Moonshine From Chicken Feed? (Correct answer)

Can you make moonshine out of horse feed?

  • It is also possible to make moonshine out of animal feed. Check out our sweet feed recipe. You can use chicken feed where the corn is a lot finer or horse feed. Just don’t use hog feed as it contains more than just corn. Making moonshine is not a simple process. However, at How to Moonshine, we believe it is an important tradition to keep alive.

Contents

Can you ferment chicken pellets?

You can ferment crumble, pellets, or whole grain chicken feed (though grain feed holds up the best; the others expand more and get a bit mushy). You can even ferment scratch as a treat, though it shouldn’t replace their layer feed. Now, pour dechlorinated or filtered water over the top of the feed.

How much sugar do I need for 5 gallons of mash?

For example, for every 1 gallon of water, you would use 1 pound of sugar, and 1 pound of corn meal. So for a 5 gallon mash (which is recommended for your first batches of moonshine) you would use 5 gallons of water, 5 pounds of corn meal, and 5 pounds of sugar.

Can you use feed store cracked corn for moonshine?

You may want to take your cracked con one step further and have it ground to make a corn meal. This is fine as long as the corn is a coarse grind. It is also possible to make moonshine out of animal feed. Check out our sweet feed recipe.

What kind of chicken feed can you ferment?

You can ferment any feed you currently give your chickens, whether it’s crumbles, pellets, scratch, or whole grains and seeds. The higher quality your feed, the more your chickens will gain from lacto-fermentation.

How do you make homemade chicken mash?

Making layers feed

  1. Add the whole maize meal, soya, fish meal, maize bran, and limestone powder into a container.
  2. Mix the ingredients until they are thoroughly combined.
  3. Stir the feed with a shovel, spade or a stick until all the ingredients are evenly dispersed throughout the container.

What kind of corn is best for moonshine?

The kind of corn for moonshine that we recommend is cracked, dry yellow corn, and yes, it’s field corn. It should be a good grade corn that is relatively clean.

What kind of water do you use to cut moonshine?

One of the most important tips I can give to moonshiners is to always use distilled water for making moonshine wash. It’s no secret that tap water contains a plethora of chemicals, some of which includes chlorine, chlorate, bromate and fluoride.

Can you make alcohol with just water sugar and yeast?

The key ingredient, sugar, is converted into alcohol by the process of fermentation by the second ingredient, yeast. Homemade liquor can be made easily if you have sugar, water (to form a sugar solution) and baking yeast.

What does a thumper do on a moonshine still?

The thump keg is one of the most clever and iconic design elements of the traditional hillbilly still whose purpose, briefly stated, is to distill the output of the pot still a second time, without actually having to run the distillate through the still twice.

What does Barley do for moonshine?

Barley develops enzymes during malting that are needed to convert starches into sugar during the mash process. A typical grain bill for a whiskey mash normally consists of malted barley with other added grains such as corn, rye or wheat.

How much moonshine will a 8 gallon still make?

An 8 Gallon will make about a quart of distillate per hour and you’ll end up with about a gallon to a gallon and a half of product when finished. The 13 will work at the same output (a quart an hour) but end up producing around two gallons to two and a half gallons.

How much moonshine do you get from 5 gallons of mash?

A 5 gallon run will yield 1-2 gallons of alcohol. A 8 gallon run will yield 1.5-3 gallons of alcohol. A 10 gallon run will yield 2-4 gallons of alcohol.

Why was moonshine made illegal?

So why is moonshine still illegal? Because the liquor is worth more to the government than beer or wine. Uncle Sam takes an excise tax of $2.14 for each 750-milliliter bottle of 80-proof spirits, compared with 21 cents for a bottle of wine (of 14 percent alcohol or less) and 5 cents for a can of beer.

Can you reuse mash for moonshine?

In order to reuse your mash this is how it works. You will use your old corn and yeast already present from the previous run, which should also still contain a good lot of beer still left behind. Now you can run the mash again.

Sweet Feed Moonshine 2021

Make way for a brand new competition series in which the top liquor manufacturers will compete to determine who is the best. This month’s episode of Master Distiller will air on NBC, and it will feature three contenders competing for the coveted title. More information about this new series was released in a press release issued by Discovery Channel, according to the network. That may be found farther down on this page. “It’s three opponents. Each judge will be assigned to a different position on the scale.

The series follows the journey of America’s top legal and outlaw distillers as they strive to join the ranks of the greats and earn the title of Master Distiller.

A centuries-old tradition is carried on by distillers all around the United States.

Several different distilleries are now vying for a place in the annals of alcoholic beverage production history.

Beyond the requisite level of skill required to complete the challenges, these competitors will be required to demonstrate a thorough understanding of the craft as well as extraordinary creativity as they transform raw local ingredients into authentic, handcrafted spirits that will impress even the most seasoned distilling professionals.

  • to the champions of each show.
  • Magilla Entertainment produces MASTER DISTILLER, which airs on Discovery Channel.
  • Paola Espinosa is an associate producer for Discovery Channel, while Bill Howard is the executive producer.
  • This new competition series will begin next month; will you be watching it?
  1. Bring one gallon of water to a boil in a large stockpot
  2. Remove from heat. 5 pounds of sugar should be mixed in until completely dissolved. 4 gallons of water should be added to the fermentation bucket, followed by 10 pounds of sweet feed, thoroughly mixed. Add the sugar syrup and allow it to cool to room temperature before adding the yeast. Close the lid snugly, insert the airlock, and let the mixture to ferment for approximately 10-14 days at room temperature. Make a cheesecloth or a siphon tube to separate the wash from the solids, then collect the wash in a moonshine still. Distill as normal, handle cuttings if necessary, collect the spirit, and store it in a jar for later use. (or right now! )

Horse feed has a tendency to burn to the bottom of the still’s pot, so strain the wash thoroughly before moving it from the fermenter to the still.

Generally speaking, distillers yeast appears to be the best choice for this sort of mash, but you may experiment with different varieties as well. The type of still you use will have a significant impact on the flavor and proof of the spirit you produce.

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I’ve never cooked it before, but I was asked to share the recipe for someone in chat, which I gladly did. Since I was unable to locate an email address to request permission, I will just state that the recipe belongs to Charlie Porter and that the online link is I posted it exactly as he has it on his website. Good luck, and remember not to shine while driving. I have no clue how long the preparations will take.

  • Gallon of dried cracked corn (like in chicken feed) or 1/2 gallon of dried whole corn (like in chicken feed)
  • A can of blue ribbon malt syrup (which gives it a smooth flavor)
  • A gallon of dried cracked corn (like in chicken feed).

NUTRITION INFO

Amount Per Serving:1 (16276) g Servings Per Recipe:1 AMT. PER SERVING percent Amount Per Serving PERFORMANCE ON A DAILY BASIS caloric intake: 1316.5 caloric intake derived from Percentage of fat zero grams zero percent The total fat content is 0% g0 percent. Saturated fat is 0 g0 percent of total fat. Carbohydrates in total: 340.1 g (113 percent). Dietary Fiber 0 g0 percent Dietary Fiber The amount of sugar in 339.9 grams is 1359 percent.

DIRECTIONS

  • Stir the mixture frequently and keep it in a warm location, and it will soon begin to operate
  • It should be placed in the “can” to cook just before it stops operating (when there is a lacy bubble on the surface). If and when this begins to boil, it will emerge out the end of the coil. In order to collect the run, place the jug beneath the condenser spout
  • Reduce the first gallon of water to around 120 proof as it runs out
  • If you want color, you can use burned sugar and water in this step.

RECIPE MADE WITH LOVE BY

The recipe for this was given to me by someone in chat, and I have never cooked it before.” Since I was unable to locate an email address to request permission, I will just state that the recipe belongs to Charlie Porter and that the online link is I posted it exactly as he has it on his website. Good luck, and remember not to shine while driving. “I have no clue how much time will be required for preparation.”

recipes

I’ve been producing moonshine for more than two decades and have experimented with a variety of formulas and measuring techniques. In spite of the fact that I have tried with every sort of ingredient possible, the smoothest mash I have ever prepared is so basic that it will take your breath away. The following dish is also suitable for those who are new to cooking. This recipe does not rely on complicated components to break down starch chains into sugars, as is the case with many others. This dish is quite easy to make.

The key weapon is sweet feed, as you may have guessed.

Enjoy!

Why is the mash recipe so important?

When it comes to the flavor of the whiskey, the mash is by far the most crucial thing to consider. Consider the following scenario: you go on a whiskey run and the whiskey turns out to be 110 proof. This indicates that it contains 55 percent alcohol. As a result, the remaining 45 percent is made up of the water that came from the mash. As a result, the final product is significantly influenced by the mash. The entire amount of the mash produced by this recipe, including the grains, is 30 gallons.

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Smoothest Mash Recipe Ingredients

  • Sugar, yeast, and water are used in the preparation of sweet feed (unpelletized). Are you looking for more mashed potatoes recipes? Obtain 20 free moonshine recipes delivered directly to your inbox! Take advantage of 20 tried-and-true recipes that are simple, tasty, and time-saving. After you’ve gathered your supplies, you’ll need to figure out how many gallons you’ll need to make your batch. Using varied size recipes for mash batches, I’ve constructed the chart below, which is measured in gallons. The batch size may be changed easily by simply inserting different values from the chart into the following instructions:

Moonshine Batch Sizing Table

Gallons Grains (gallons) Yeast (Tbsp) Sugar (lbs)
30 5 6 25
20 3.5 4 16
10 2 2 8
5 1 1 4
2.5 .5 .5 2

Step-By-Step Guide To Making Moonshine

Sweet feed (non-pelletized); chopped maize; sugar; yeast; water; and More Mash Recipes are available here. Sign up to receive 20 free moonshine recipes emailed to your inbox. Take advantage of 20 tried-and-true recipes that are simple, delicious, and quick to make. After you’ve gathered your ingredients, you’ll need to figure out how many gallons you’ll need to make your recipe. Using varied size recipes for mash batches in gallons, I’ve constructed the chart below.

You may change the batch size by simply inserting different numbers from the chart into the steps that follow.

Step Two: Mix the Mash

Pour the cracked grains into a 30-gallon container and whisk in 25 pounds of sugar until well combined. When the sugar has completely dissolved, add 15 to 20 gallons of cold water at a time until the mash mix reaches a total volume of 30 gallons (by volume). Sweet feed and yeast pack are added to chopped corn. After hearing from a number of my readers that it can be difficult to get unpelletized sweet feed for this recipe, I developed an ingredients package that you can purchase that has everything you need to mash a 10 gallon batch.

Step Three: Add the Yeast

When the temperature of the mash has cooled to the temperature advised by the yeast manufacturer, you can proceed to add the yeast to it. I’ve discovered that 1 tablespoon of yeast per 5 gallons of mash produces satisfactory results. The greatest results will be obtained with distiller’s yeast. I’ve discovered that the Red Star brand works really well and is extremely reasonably priced. Red Star Yeast is difficult to come by in your area, but you can order it from Amazonhere.

Step Four: Let the Mash Ferment

As soon as the mash’s temperature has dropped to the temperature advised by its yeast maker, you can proceed to add the yeast. The ratio of 1 tablespoon of yeast per 5 gallons of mash has shown to be effective in my experiments. In order to achieve the best results, use distiller’s yeast. My experience has shown me that the Red Star brand performs admirably while remaining reasonably priced.. Locally, Red Star Yeast is difficult to come by; however, it is available for purchase on Amazonhere.

Summary

I hope you have liked this post and that you will find the recipe to be simple and enjoyable to prepare! You will thoroughly love the exceptionally smooth whiskey that is produced by this mash. Just keep in mind that moonshine production is both an art and a science, and your first batch will almost certainly not be flawless, and your second batch will almost certainly not be either. Nonetheless, if you persist with it and master the intricacies of your still, you will soon become an expert in the art of moonshining production!

Good luck with your stilling!

Why and How to Ferment Your Chicken Feed

In this letter, I’d want to discuss with you a procedure that has captivated me for some time, but I wasn’t ready to share my discovery with you until I’d had enough experience with it. The lacto-fermentation of chicken feed is the result of this finding. So, to put it another way, fermented chicken feed is like probiotics for your chickens. Lactic acid fermentation produces a wet mash (the chicken keeper’s name for moistened food), which is then fermented further (thesame type of fermentation that occurs naturally in sauerkraut).

Fermenting my chicken feed has been a part of my routine since 2012, when I needed to get through a 50-pound bag of scratch grains as soon and effectively as possible.

If you already give them a healthywhole-grain diet, they will just disregard the scratch you toss on the ground.) They will peck and scratch the ground regardless of what you do.

How Does Lacto-Fermentation of Your Chicken Feed Work?

Because of the reduction in phytic acid and enzyme inhibitors found in all grains, seeds, and legumes on the first day of soaking, the digestibility of your grains will be substantially improved. In as little as two days, lactic acid bacteria begin to ferment the grains by devouring the sugars present in the grains and multiplying in large numbers, resulting in the production of lactic acid. lactic acid makes the environment unfavorable for harmful bacteria, leaving only helpful germs to thrive in its place.

just ask anybody who has tried over-fermented kimchi).

Why Ferment Your Chicken Feed

Because it reduces the amount of phytic acid and enzyme inhibitors present in all grains, seeds, and legumes, the first day of soaking considerably increases the digestibility of your grains. Bacterial fermentation occurs on the second day when lactic acid bacteria consume the carbohydrates in the grains and grow in large numbers, resulting in the formation of lactic acid. When the lactic acid is produced, it degrades the environment, allowing only helpful microorganisms to thrive in the environment.

just ask anybody who has tasted over-fermented kimchi…).

How to Ferment Your Chicken Feed

Because it reduces the amount of phytic acid and enzyme inhibitors present in all grains, seeds, and legumes, the first day of soaking considerably enhances the digestibility of the grains. By the second day, lactic acid bacteria had begun to ferment the grains, eating the sugars in the grains and multiplying in large numbers, resulting in the production of lactic acid. lactic acid makes the environment unfavorable for harmful bacteria, leaving only good germs to thrive in its absence. The grains will remain preserved for as long as they are submerged in their lactic acid “bath” (however there is a limit at which the grains might become overly sour and hence unappealing…

Gallon-Size Glass Jar|Mini Strainer

Every time I strain a certain amount of fermented feed from my jar, I replenish it with the equal amount of dry feed. Add extra feed the next day after stirring and re-covering the container with a lid. This is the quickest and most convenient way to keep your lacto-fermentation running without having to start afresh. You may keep recycling the same liquid indefinitely, especially because it already has all of the beneficial bacteria that aid in the fermentation of fresh grains. A container of pre-mixed grains sits directly next to a jar of fermented feed in my home setup for feeding my animals.

This makes it simple to replenish the ferment jar with fresh grains after each scoop of liquid is removed. The jars are kept on a dark shelf in my kitchen, where the temperature normally ranges between 68°F and 70°F on a regular basis.

What I’ve Learned In the Last Year

Theoretically, you can reuse the ferment liquid indefinitely, and it will just become better and better with time (and by better, that means it will contain an amazing amount of probiotic bacteria). In the meanwhile, I’ve begun new batches of fermented feed on a few occasions, generally when I’m planning to be away for at least a week and don’t want the feed to go too sour. However, if your ferment liquid gets slimy, sludgy, or smelly (a side effect of oxygen killing the beneficial bacteria and introducing the bad bacteria), you should start over with new water.

  1. I have never utilized a starter to kick-start the lacto-fermentation process, and you are not need to do so as well.
  2. By the fourth day, your feed will have fermented to the greatest extent possible.
  3. Acetic acid bacteria can be found in vinegar.
  4. If you opt to add one or two tablespoons of acetic acid to the water or feed of your hens, it will not harm them, but it will not be effective as a starter for lacto-fermentation.
  5. Until it’s time to feed the hens, I offer them a scoop or two of fermented feed and dump the dish when it’s completely empty.
  6. Only put out enough grain so that your hens can complete it in half an hour at the most.
  7. When I give them fermented feed, it appears that they consume half as much as they would otherwise.

I believe it is safe to say that when feed is fermented, they consume less of it.

I don’t provide fermented feed to my hens on a consistent basis.

When it comes to eating, though, I believe in the need of moderation.

A fermented item should not be served as a main dish every day, and our hens should not be served fermented foods either.

I continue to offer them usual dry feed on a few days a week basis, especially while I am away from the farm.

I’d estimate they’re on average feeding fermented feed for half a week and dry feed for the other half of the week right now. In any case, they are as happy and healthy as they possibly can be!

Fermenting Sources

It’s no secret that our hens are extremely well-cared for. As cherished pets that also happen to give us with delicious organic eggs to eat, providing them with the best nutrition and care possible is a key concern for us. One of the many unique things we do for them is ferment their chicken feed, which is only one of the many things we do for them. That also shouldn’t come as a surprise if you are familiar with us! At Homestead and Chill, fermented foods are a source of great pride for our team.

  • you name it!
  • Continue reading to find out how to ferment chicken feed and why it is so beneficial to your bird’s health and wellbeing.
  • Not to add that they absolutely adore the stuff!
  • Additionally, you will get the benefits in the form of more nutrient-dense eggs.

What is lacto-fermentation?

This happens when good bacteria (lactobacillus) that is naturally found in the environment (such as soil, vegetables, or your poultry feed grains) interacts with food while being kept in a controlled environment (such as a refrigerator). In order to ferment chicken feed in a controlled setting, a mason jar, bucket, or big glass bowl filled with water is all that is required. The lactobacillus bacterium breaks down starch and sugar in meals to produce lactic acid bacteria (LAB). A natural probiotic culture is encouraged, pH is lowered, and dangerous bacteria are prevented from growing in the feed as a result of this treatment method.

Why ferment chicken feed?

There are a variety of reasons why you should give your flock fermented chicken feed on a regular basis, or at the very least on occasion. In a nutshell (um… I mean eggshell), introducing probiotics to a child’s diet can assist to enhance their digestion, absorption of nutrients, and general health. Even better, it is a highly effective method of feeding your flock! Fermenting chicken feed can lower the quantity of grains required to maintain a healthy flock, resulting in financial savings for you.

Our chickens are happy and healthy.

HEALTH BENEFITS OF FERMENTED CHICKEN FEED

The procedure of soaking chicken feed grains makes it easier for the birds to digest the grains. Most obviously, softened feed is more mild on the stomach – or, in the case of chickens, on their crop and gizzard – since it is less dense. There is, however, more to it than that! All grains, seeds, nuts, beans, and other legumes include phytic acid, which is an enzyme inhibitor, as well as other enzyme inhibitors. Phytic acid has the potential to inhibit the absorption of certain nutrients and minerals, and is consequently frequently referred to as a “anti-nutrient.

That is one of the reasons we enjoy growing seeds and grains for our hens, such as alfalfa, barley, maize, sunflower seeds, and other seeds and grains.

Last but not least, fermentation has been demonstrated to increase the amount of some vitamins present in foods, such as Vitamin B, by as much as 50%.

2) Added Probiotics and Immune Health

Beneficial bacteria populations increase when lactic acid bacteria work to ferment chicken feed. Probiotics produced as a result of this process are excellent for digestion, immunity, and better gut health. The gut health of a person is strongly tied to the overall health of the person, as discussed in our article “Health Benefits of Fermented Foods Explained.” According to research, animals who receive a consistent dose of probiotics through fermented feed have a more stronger immune system than those that consume a conventional dry feed diet.

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Meaning that hens fed fermented feed are less prone to contract infections and other ailments, and they live longer, less complex lives as a result of their diet.

3) Better Quality Eggs

Several studies published in the Journal of British Poultry Science found that birds fed fermented chicken feed produced larger eggs, had thicker shells, and had more shell stiffness than chickens fed dry diet. Egg-bound hens are significantly more likely to lay soft-shell eggs than they are to lay hard-shell eggs, both of which can be life-threatening if they do not have firm eggshells. It’s also important to remember that everything you feed your chickens will end up in their eggs as well. If you provide them with great nutrition (which may include eating fermented feed), the eggs they lay for you will be very nutritious in return.

4) More Bang For Your Buck

Several studies published in the Journal of British Poultry Science found that birds fed fermented chicken feed produced larger eggs, had thicker shells, and had more rigid shells than chickens fed dry feed. Having excellent solid eggshells means that your hens will be far less likely to have problems with laying soft-shell eggs or getting egg-bound, both of which may be life-threatening. It’s also important to remember that everything you feed your chickens will end up in their eggs. In exchange for providing them with excellent nutrition (which may include eating fermented feed), the eggs they lay for you will be exceptionally nutritious.

When and How Much to Feed Chickens Fermented Food

This all depends on your preference for how frequently you choose to give your flock fermented chicken feed. There is no such thing as “overdoing anything” — the more regularly you do it, the better! I know some chicken keepers who feed their birds fermented feed exclusively, while others only offer their chickens fermented feed as a special treat on occasion. However, fermenting feed does need a number of extra procedures in comparison to simply keeping a huge feeder of dry grain out for the duration of the week.

  1. In our case, a “batch” of fermented feed is equal to two days’ worth of feed, which means our females receive it on average four days each week.
  2. However, when our hens are molting, agitated, or otherwise appear to be feeling under the weather, we have plenty of fermented feed on hand!
  3. Provide approximately the same amount of fermented chicken feed as you would normally provide for them.
  4. For example, our favorite organic layer feed, Scratch and Peck organic layer feed, recommends 14 cup of feed for every bird.

Again, because fermented chicken feed may keep them more full and also swells somewhat in volume after soaking, they may consume little less than they would otherwise. Check to see what your flock will eat and make any necessary adjustments.

HOW TO MAKE FERMENTED CHICKEN FEED

Find a container that will work well for fermenting the feed. Large glass jars, bowls, and buckets are excellent examples of this. Because fermentation results in a minor acidity in the feed, it is preferable to use glass, ceramic, or BPA-free plastic containers. Your feed bin should be large enough to carry a day’s or two’s worth of grain for your flock, with enough additional space to allow for watering, stirring, and growth. Fill the container halfway with enough chicken feed to provide one or two daily servings for your flock.

You may ferment crumbles, pellets, or whole grain chicken feed to use as chicken feed (though grain feed holds up the best; the others expand more and get a bit mushy).

Pour dechlorinated or filtered water over the top of the feed now to finish the process.

Chlorinated water may have an adverse effect on healthy fermentation.

Step 2: Let It Ferment

Place a loose-fitting lid, plate, or other improvised lid on top of the container to keep the contents within. It is not necessary for it to be airtight! Essentially, the goal is to prevent wandering mold spores from floating in while simultaneously allowing fermentation gasses to leave. Place the container in an area with moderate temperatures for three to four days to allow the fermentation process to take place. We just leave ours on the kitchen counter. Every day, double-check and scriit.

  • By the second or third day, you should notice little bubbles on the surface of the feed mixture and/or within the feed mixture.
  • It should have a little acidic, sour, and sweet aroma, akin to that of yogurt or yeast, but not as strong.
  • In addition, the liquid will get progressively murky.
  • While fermented chicken feed will be adequately kept (because to the low pH) and safe to consume for up to three or four days after fermentation, the taste will become more sour the longer it is left to ferment.
  • We conducted a poll among the residents of our backyard and discovered that our flock liked its feed to be fermented for three days.

Step 3: Drain and Feed

It’s time to eat! Even if the fermented chicken feed hasn’t absorbed all of the water, you may either drain it off into the bushes or save the liquid to use in a fresh batch of fermented chicken feed later. In fact, the lactic acid bacteria in the “brine” will be delighted to feed on more fresh grains, and this might actually cause the next batch to be finished approximately a day earlier than planned. With regard to time management, it will be necessary for you to establish your own personal fermented feed routine.

Alternatively, you might start one batch after another and avoid providing fermented feed on a consistent basis.

To make it easier to manage big batches of feed across two days, just scoop off half on day three and drain/use the remaining half on day four of the fermentation process.

Our ladies don’t consume it as quickly after more than three days of fermentation, so we chill the amount that hasn’t been served in order to stop the fermentation process till the remainder is consumed the next day. A ferment takes three days to complete from beginning to end.

Simple, effective, and worthwhile!

In a nutshell, fermented chicken feed is a simple and economical approach to give your ladies an extra kick! It has the potential to result in healthier hens, higher-quality eggs, and maybe cheaper feed costs. What could possibly be bad about all of that? Please accept my sincere thanks for taking the time to read this post. If this is the case, please help us spread the word by sharing this page! Last but not least, I hope your chickens are enjoying their new feed! You might be interested in the following related articles:

  • Spinach and sprouted seeds are a nutritious treat for backyard chickens. In hot summer weather or during heat waves, there are a number of things you can do to keep your chickens cool. Tips for Caring for Chickens During the Coldest Part of the Year In order to provide essential calcium to chickens, eggshells or oyster shells should be fed. Best Practices for Storing Fresh Backyard Chicken EggsWashing Fresh Backyard Chicken Eggs Do Chickens Start Laying Eggs When They Reach a Certain Age? 5 Telltale Signs That It’s About to Happen
  • Chicken Breeds for Your Backyard Flock: The Best 18 Breeds

How to Make Fermented Chicken Feed

Farming chicken feed in a fermentation system is a straightforward and affordable approach to boost the nutritional value of your hens’ food, resulting in improved health and higher quality eggs in the long run. It only requires a few resources and a short amount of time to complete. Come and find out how! Preparation time: 5 minutes Time for Fermentation3d Chicken Feed and Fermented Foods are among the topics covered. Fermented chicken feed, fermented feed, fermenting chicken feed are all terms used to refer to fermented chicken feed.

  • A large glass jar, mixing bowl, bucket, or other container (preferably one that is not made of BPA)
  • 1-2 servingschen feed of choice (for the entire flock), which may be whole grain meal, pellets, or crumbles
  • Verify that your chicken feed is being served in accordance with the serving guidelines (e.g., 1/4 cup per bird per day). Then select a container that is large enough to accommodate one or two daily doses of feed for your flock, as well as some additional space for water, expansion, and stirring
  • And Fill the container with enough chicken feed to last your flock for one or two days’ worth of meals. We typically ferment two cups of feed, which is plenty for two days. Pour dechlorinated or filtered water on top of the feed to dilute the chlorine. Ensure that the feed is completely immersed and has a couple inches of room to expand before adding more water. In order to enable chlorine to disperse, simply leave a glass of city tap water out at room temperature overnight.
  • Place a loose-fitting lid, plate, or other improvised lid on top of the container to keep the contents within. It is not necessary for it to be airtight. Allow for three to four days of fermentation in an area with moderate temperatures (such as out on the counter, in the garage, etc.)
  • Check and stir the container every day. If the feed has not absorbed all of the water, add more water. Fermented feed should be given to the hens after 3 to 4 days (our chicks prefer day 3). If it hasn’t absorbed all of the water, you may either drain it off and discard it, or save the liquid to use as a starter for a fresh batch of fermented feed. Repeat the process as needed, and create a timetable for your fermenting operation. In order to have a finished batch of fermented feed ready at all times, some people start staggered batches every day (with a date on the container!) for a few days to ensure that they always have a finished batch of fermented feed available. We create a two-day supply at a time, so we refrigerate the portion that hasn’t been fed so that we may feed them the next day and also start a fresh batch.

How to Ferment Chicken Feed – 6 Simple Steps (Photos)

In order to reduce your poultry feed costs by as much as 50 percent, fermentation must be the most effective method. “Can you tell me why I should ferment my chicken feed?” During the fermentation process, extra nutrients that would otherwise be “locked” inside the feed are “unlocked.” Not only is it better for your hens’ health, but they will consume less as a result of the high nutrient content of fermented feed. The following is a summary of the most significant advantages of fermenting your chicken feed, which will help both you and your birds.

BENEFITS OF FERMENTING CHICKEN FEED
SAVES ON FEED COST BY AS MUCH AS 50%
INCREASES VOLUME OF FEED
CHICKENS EAT LESS
CHICKENS POOP LESS
UNLOCKS ADDITIONAL NUTRIENTS
RELEASES HEALTHY PROBIOTICS
BUILDS BENEFICIAL BACTERIA IN THE GUT
AIDS IN DIGESTION
CREATES HEALTHIER CHICKENS
THICKER EGG SHELLS
INCREASES EGG PRODUCTION
TASTIER EGGS
DESTROYS MOLD SPORES ON CHICKEN FEED

Step 1: Gather Supplies to Ferment Chicken Feed

The supplies required to ferment chicken feed are listed below. Fermenting chicken feed takes three days before it is ready to be fed to your hens, according to the manufacturer. Having three jars, buckets, or containers of fermented feed running at the same time is required if you wish to be able to give this on a daily basis. In the event that you just have a small flock of 6 or less birds, a 1/2 gallon mason jar or an equivalent-sized container would suffice. Consider using a 5 gallon bucket with a lid if you have a bigger flock.

1 CONTAINER(S)
2 CHICKEN FEED
3 DISTILLED WATER
4 SPOON
5 STRAINER

SUPPLIES REQUIRED FOR THE FERMENTATION OF CHICKEN FOOD

Step 2: Choosing Chicken Feed to Ferment

If you give your hens chicken crumbles or pellets or whole grains (or even chick starting feed), you may use any grains that you regularly feed them to ferment. Some folks choose to prepare their own feed by combining crumbles with whole grains and blending them together. “Can Baby Chicks Eat Fermented Feed?” says the author. Yes, even newborn chicks can benefit from the higher concentrations of nutrients and probiotics found in fermented poultry feed, according to the USDA. Follow the same procedures as you would for adult chickens, except that you will be using chick starting crumbles instead of regular chicken starter.

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COMMON CHICKEN FEED FOR FERMENTATION
CHICKEN CRUMBLES
CHICKEN PELLETS
CHICKEN SCRATCH
WHOLE OATS
WHEAT
SUNFLOWER SEEDS
FLAX SEED
OAT GROATS
BARLEY
FIELD PEAS

Step 3: Adding Water to Chicken Feed

It is critical to use distilled water rather than plain tap water from a hose or faucet to avoid contamination. The chlorine and fluoride in your tap water will interfere with the fermentation process, so use bottled water instead. Instead of using distilled water, you may use conventional hose or tap water by allowing it to sit out for 24 hours before using it. Another option is to boil it for 20 minutes and then allow it to cool to room temperature before using. The chlorine and fluoride will be removed from the water as a result of this.

It’s important to remember that the feed will increase significantly during the fermentation process.

Place the lid of your container on your container with care. Keeping the lid on will prevent mold spores from floating in, while leaving it open will allow gasses to escape.

Water from a hose or a faucet should not be used; instead, distilled water should be used. The chlorine and fluoride in your tap water can interfere with the fermentation process, so use caution while using it. Instead of using distilled water, you may use conventional hose or tap water by allowing it to sit out for 24 hours before using. It may also be cooked for 20 minutes at a low temperature and then returned to room temperature. The chlorine and fluoride will be removed from the water in this way.

It’s important to remember that the feed will increase significantly throughout the fermentation process.

Your container’s lid should be placed loosely on it.

Step 4: Stirring Fermenting Chicken Feed

ADD FERMENTING CHICKEN FEED 3 TIMES A DAY AT EQUAL INTERVALS TO THE STIRRING TANK. Stir the feed three times a day, at evenly spaced intervals, for best results. A decent timetable to attempt to adhere to is the following: morning, noon, and night. By the end of the first day, you will observe little bubbles on the surface of the water, which indicate the presence of bacteria. This is a collection of carbon dioxide gasses. These gaseous emissions arise as a result of the breakdown of the glucose and starches in the chicken feed by the beneficial bacteria in the feed.

  • Do this for a total of three days.
  • This is not something you want to feed to your hens.
  • It will nevertheless provide some additional advantages.
  • The scent of the fermented chicken feed should be somewhat sweet, similar to that of yogurt or yeast.
  • If this is the case, throw it away.

Step 5: Straining Fermented Chicken Feed

BEFORE SERVING YOUR CHICKEN FEED, STAIN THE FERMENTED CHICKEN FEED FOR 3 DAYS OR 72 HOURSAfter 3 days or 72 hours of fermentation, your feed is ready to be served to your hens. Take care to ensure that the food smells good and that there is no mold developing on it before serving it to your guests. Pour some fermented feed into your strainer and set it over a bucket to allow the liquid to drain. Keep the liquid in case you want to prepare another batch of fermented feed later.

Because it already includes helpful bacteria, this will expedite the process considerably. If you do not want to reuse the liquid from the fermented feed, scoop the meal and spread it directly on the ground for your flock. Eventually, it will naturally sink into the earth.

Step 6: Feeding Fermented Feed to Chickens

It is possible to pour fermented feed directly on the ground. IT WILL STRAIN THE LIQUID OUT AND OUTWARDS INTO THE EARTH. You will notice a difference during the first week or two that you will not be need to give your flock as much food. Fermented feed is densely packed with nutrients that your hens now have easier access to and digest because of the fermentation process. As a starting point, offer your hens their usual quantities of feed while also feeding them fermented feed to watch how they respond.

  1. Serving fermented feed to your hens is something you may do on a regular basis or as a “reward” for your flock on special occasions.
  2. Adding more feed to the container and topping it off with additional distilled water after you have served your flock for the day is a good idea.
  3. Make use of your sense of smell.
  4. If you’re seeking for more nutritious homemade foods for your hens, chicken fodder is a good option to think about.

Conclusion: How to Ferment Chicken Feed

In addition to providing your flock with healthier food, growing healthier hens, producing nicer eggs, and saving money on feed costs, fermenting your chicken feed is an excellent method to save money on feed costs. It is simple to perform and will help both you and your flock in a variety of ways in the long run!

deer corn for making Whiskey? – Whisky Recipes

Brewhaus Forum»Recipes»Whisky Recipes»Brewhaus Forum»Recipes»Brewhaus Forum»Recipes»Brewhaus Forum»Recipes»Brewhaus Forum»Recipes»Brewhaus Forum»Recipes»Brewhaus Forum»Recipes»Brewhaus Forum»Recipes»Brewhaus Forum»Recipes»Brewhaus Forum»Recipe Is it possible to use deer grain to make whiskey?

maverick 1Posted :Monday, November 24, 2008 8:20:52 AM(UTC)
Rank: Junior MemberReputation:Groups: RegisteredJoined: 7/18/2008(UTC) Posts: 13 “I saw that Wal Mart was selling large bags of deer corn (dried and hard) in their garden section.Does anyone know or has anyone made whiskey by mashing this type of corn?The bags are less than $10 and I believe it was about 20 lbs.A quick response would be appreciated as I am sure this is a seasonal. If it will work, I will stock up!cheers.”
scotty 2Posted :Friday, July 31, 2009 12:15:35 PM(UTC)
Rank: Senior MemberReputation:Groups: Registered, Moderator Joined: 7/25/2009(UTC) Posts: 2,209 “Originally Posted by: maverickI saw that Wal Mart was selling large bags of deer corn (dried and hard) in their garden section.Does anyone know or has anyone made whiskey by mashing this type of corn?The bags are less than $10 and I believe it was about 20 lbs.A quick response would be appreciated as I am sure this is a seasonal. If it will work, I will stock up!cheers.Deer are very sensative animals and any grains that can be fed to them are safe and should work well”
Wade 3Posted :Friday, July 31, 2009 1:08:20 PM(UTC)
Rank: Advanced MemberReputation:Groups: RegisteredJoined: 2/8/2009(UTC) Posts: 159 He probably wanted a quicker responce!:) Its good to know though for all newbies.
mtnwalker2 4Posted :Friday, July 31, 2009 1:10:13 PM(UTC)
Rank: Senior MemberReputation:Groups: RegisteredJoined: 10/22/2005(UTC) Posts: 817 “Originally Posted by: maverickI saw that Wal Mart was selling large bags of deer corn (dried and hard) in their garden section.Does anyone know or has anyone made whiskey by mashing this type of corn?The bags are less than $10 and I believe it was about 20 lbs.A quick response would be appreciated as I am sure this is a seasonal. If it will work, I will stock up!cheers.Is it cracked?if not you will have to do it yourself and its tough. Cracked corn- chicken feed is about $5 to 7 for a 50bag.Unless you are planning to malt the corn this would be a better way to go. Even if you malt it, you will still have to crush or break it. Let us know your fmethod and we can help further.”
Arkie 5Posted :Monday, August 03, 2009 12:04:15 AM(UTC)
Rank: Junior MemberReputation:Groups: RegisteredJoined: 7/8/2009(UTC) Posts: 22 Some deer corn is treated to keep from molding and has a pink coating. I’m not sure what it is but would check into it if it’s pink.
luis 6Posted :Thursday, December 17, 2009 1:51:20 PM(UTC)
Rank: Junior MemberReputation:Groups: RegisteredJoined: 10/12/2009(UTC) Posts: 19 “I had a friend who gave me a bag of deer corn.I talked to the guy at the feed store where it came from.He said it was very clean and should be no problem.I malted it to where the sprouts came out about an inch or so, removed the growths after that.Put it in a heavy freezer bag, smacked it some with a mallet while it was still moist and stuck it in a pot.Repeated the process for the next two hours until I had enough in the pot and swore I’d never do it again.There wasn’t a high % of alcohol when the mash was done fermenting.I went through distilling 5 gallons to end up with about 2 quarts of whiskey after three runs through the EZ Still.Good stuff, but a lot of work.That was about 10 pounds of corn.I still have 40more (ugh).My next time I am planning to put a couple pounds of cracked barley in (heating it up like you’re supposed to- 2 hours at 140-150ºF to convert the starch), and seeing how that goes.Still, lots of work.Question:If you don’t malt, how do you convert the starch?Does amalase work?I’m planning on just getting crushed chicken feed corn next time, sounds a LOT easier.”
mtnwalker2 7Posted :Thursday, December 17, 2009 3:06:09 PM(UTC)
Rank: Senior MemberReputation:Groups: RegisteredJoined: 10/22/2005(UTC) Posts: 817 Try the UJSM no cook method for a few iterations. Get some cracked chicken feed. Deer corn is hard, high dent corn, without a lot of starch. Simular to pop corn. To my way of thinking, malting and mashing just isn’t worth the time, expense and work for a taste not much different from proper easy no cook style. In the long run, its the oak ageing done right that is the quality builder. That and some aereation.
Cornbread 8Posted :Sunday, January 03, 2010 12:40:30 PM(UTC)
Rank: NewbieReputation:Groups: RegisteredJoined: 11/11/2009(UTC) Posts: 3 “I’m too new at this to compare what tastes best.but, I got some liquid malt from Whole Foods grocery store. 5 pounds sugar, 5 gal water, 1 can liquid grocery store malt, yeast.GEEZ it is so good. So easy. Soaked with charred wood. I am now trying to make corn likker using a large box of ground up corn flakes. I hear it is good.”
LWTCS 9Posted :Monday, January 04, 2010 12:14:26 PM(UTC)
Rank: Senior MemberReputation:Groups: RegisteredJoined: 12/10/2009(UTC) Posts: 519 ” I am now trying to make corn likker using a large box of ground up corn flakes. I hear it is good.Thats not really corn likker CB. Its still a sugarhead. Me and pumpman were trading off Faux corn likker a while back to see who’s experiment was most tolerable.Macerate some sweet can corn in your (cornflake) low wines for a few days then refridgerate to let the startch jellyfish settle to the bottom of your vessel.Then run. It ain’t real but the corn does carry over. And its easy peasy fun.”
Cornbread 10Posted :Friday, March 05, 2010 7:34:39 AM(UTC)
Rank: NewbieReputation:Groups: RegisteredJoined: 11/11/2009(UTC) Posts: 3 What does “Mascerate” mean to you?
mtnwalker2 11Posted :Friday, March 05, 2010 8:29:29 AM(UTC)
Rank: Senior MemberReputation:Groups: RegisteredJoined: 10/22/2005(UTC) Posts: 817 “Originally Posted by: CornbreadWhat does “”Mascerate”” mean to you?To chew. Many native peoples all over the world made beer by chewing ane then spitting the grains into a ferment vessel. The spit included enzymes needed for conversion and the chewing exposed the starches to the enzymes.Still done in certain areas of the world.”
wendellbaker 12Posted :Tuesday, September 20, 2011 1:26:44 PM(UTC)
Rank: NewbieReputation:Groups: RegisteredJoined: 9/9/2011(UTC) Posts: 8 “Originally Posted by: maverickI saw that Wal Mart was selling large bags of deer corn (dried and hard) in their garden section.Does anyone know or has anyone made whiskey by mashing this type of corn?The bags are less than $10 and I believe it was about 20 lbs.A quick response would be appreciated as I am sure this is a seasonal. If it will work, I will stock up!cheers.2 years later. Too late?I just ran 15 pounds of deer corn through a mill, got a combination of essentially barely cracked corn and then corn meal.I added that to about 9-10 gallons of water (actually 4.5 gallons first and made a ridiculously thick goop, then added 5 more gallons to make a thinner mash.I’m letting that sit overnight and planning on adding 7 pounds of rye and 4 pounds of 6row barley and enough boiling water to bring it up to 150-155.I’ll let that sit for 30 minutes, cool it quickly and add 2 packages of whiskey yeast and see what happens.It’s my first all grain batch and i may not do this again the same way.This deer corn is not ideal at all.”

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