Categories Moonshine

What Is.The.First Run In A Batch Of Moonshine Called? (Correct answer)

  • You may already know that the XXX you see on those old-fashioned jugs of moonshine, each X stands for another run through the pot still. The first run is what’s called a “stripping run” because its purpose is to strip the water, yeast, and sediment out of your mash before your “spirit run (s)” or primary distillation (s).

Contents

What is the first cut of moonshine called?

Foreshots – “the low boiling point compounds that come out of the still first. They contain acetone, methanol, various esters and aldehydes, and other volitiles. Foreshots are to be considered poisonous and should be discarded.”

What is a stripping run in moonshine?

The first run is what’s called a “stripping run” because its purpose is to strip the water, yeast, and sediment out of your mash before your “spirit run(s)” or primary distillation(s). Distilling this way will ultimately give you a smoother product.

Why is the first jar of moonshine discarded?

Always discard the “foreshots.” For this reason, commercial distillers will do one of two things: They will discard the first bit of alcohol produced by the still. This part of the run, known as the foreshots, smells like high powered solvent, tastes even worse, and is potentially poisonous.

What is the head of moonshine?

The first compounds released in the still as it heats up are the lower boiling point compounds which we call “heads”. These compounds include methanol, acetaldehyde and lighter esters. The overall aroma of these chemicals is kind of solvent-like and not very pleasant.

What is the process of making moonshine called?

Making moonshine or any other distilled alcohol consists of two processes: fermentation and distillation. Alcoholic fermentation is a metabolic natural process by which sugar is converted into acids, gases and alcohol, using yeast in the absence of oxygen.

How do you stop methanol when making moonshine?

Always use a collection pot made of glass, never of plastic and preferably of small mouth. And remember to place this vessel away from any fire or other form of heat. Always dispose of the first bit of moonshine, in order to avoid contamination with methanol (which has a lower boiling point than ethanol).

Is a thump keg necessary?

An ordinary pot still, without a thump keg, is capable of distilling a wash to only a “low wine”, which will be about 40-50% alcohol. Many shiners in fact prefer to use a wooden barrel for the thump keg, precisely because it loses less of this useful heat than would a metal one.

What is the point of stripping running?

When we perform our first distillation – called a ‘Run’ – it is referred to as a stripping run, because we concentrate and strip all of the alcohol out of the wash. Different alcohols come over at different temperatures and in this run, we want to collect them all – the good, the bad and the ugly.

What are feints in distilling?

What are feints? Feints is the name given to the third fraction of the distillate received from the second distillation in the pot still process. They form the undesirable last runnings of the distillation. As noted above, they are returned with the foreshots to the Spirit Still when it is recharged with low wines.

Why can’t you drink the first batch of moonshine?

Methanol Toxicity Methyl alcohol (methanol) is the bad stuff that could be found in moonshine (or any distilled spirit for that matter). Pure methanol is very dangerous and it is definitely able to cause blindness and even kill people.

How does methanol form in moonshine?

Methanol is a common contaminant of moonshine, which is typically made from fermenting a “mash” of corn, sugar, and yeast for a few days and then distilling the mixture. Methanol is not a direct byproduct of fermentation, but instead forms from the breakdown of pectin in corn.

How can I test methanol at home?

To test for the presence of methanol, you can apply sodium dichromate to a sample of the solution. To do so, mix 8 mL of a sodium dichromate solution with 4 mL of sulfuric acid. Swirl gently to mix, then add 10 drops of the mixed solution to a test tube or other small container containing the alcohol.

What is a Lyne arm?

The lyne arm is a copper tube that connects the head of a pot still to the condenser. The lyne arm is a copper tube that connects the head of a pot still to the condenser. As it leaves the head of the still a lyne arm either angles upwards, is horizontal, or angles downwards.

What is Hearts in moonshine?

The “heart” is the main body of the distillate that the distiller keeps. It is the part of the process where most of the ethanol comes through the still, and also contains pleasant flavour compounds.

Can you drink moonshine heads?

These contain the most volatile alcohols and should not be ingested, as they contain methanol and other undesirables. Commercial distillers always discard the foreshots and never consume them.

Common Moonshine Terms – Learn to Moonshine

  • In the beverage industry, ABV (alcohol by volume) refers to the proportion of alcohol (ethanol) present inside a liquid. An alcometer, also known as a spirit hydrometer, is a measurement instrument used to quantify the percentage of alcohol present in a liquid. When a double run or a thumper run is completed, backins is produced
  • Backins is weak whiskey
  • Backins is weak whiskey. Beads are the bubbles that appear on the surface of a shaken whiskey and represent the amount of alcohol in the whiskey. An oil that was dripped into low-quality whiskey by moonshiners during Prohibition to make the alcohol bead like high-quality whiskey
  • Beer is the fermented mash that has been turned into a liquid. Beer, also known as “teedum,” was frequently brewed for its own sake rather than for distillation purposes. In a blackpot, the mash is allowed to ferment directly in the still rather than in barrels or boxes. The boiler, sometimes known as a “pot,” is the container in which mashed potatoes are first cooked or boiled. Bootleg Turning a vehicle around in a controlled skid is a method used by whiskey haulers to turn a car around quickly. Cap– The top of a still that may be removed. Caps are given their names based on their shapes. Carboy– is a glass or plastic vessel used in fermenting drinks. The fermentation lock and a rubber stopper are often installed to prevent germs and oxygen from entering during the fermentation process
  • However, this is not always the case. The operation of loading the still or the thumper with beer or pumice is known as a charge. Constant-temperature condenser– The portion of the still, which is commonly a copper coil, in which the steam condenses into liquid alcohol
  • Whiskey made mostly from maize mash is known as corn whiskey. A technique known as “dropping the bead,” it is the act of decreasing the strength of liquor by mixing it with weaker alcohol or water. Instillation of alcohol through a still twice is referred to as “Double Running.” The condenser is cooled by use of a flake stand, which is a wooden water-filled box. Fermentation lock (also known as air lock) is a type of fermentation lock. a device used in beer brewing and winemaking to enable carbon dioxide created during fermentation to exit the fermenter while not allowing air to enter the fermenter, preventing the fermentation from going bad
  • Fermenter is a container that is used to ferment the washing liquid. A carboy or an airtight food grade pail is frequently employed. Foreshots are defined as “low boiling point compounds that are the first to come out of the still.” They contain acetone, methanol, various esters and aldehydes, and other volitiles. It is recommended that foreshots be discarded because they are toxic.” The term “gauger” refers to a revenue agent in the pre-Prohibition era. A bribe or payback money paid by moonshiners to law enforcement authorities is known as a granny fee. In the words of the author, “heads” are “extracted after the foreshots and are practically pure alcohol, except that they are tainted with trace levels of undesired cogeners…”
  • Liquor Car– A vehicle that has been converted to transport illicit alcohol to market. Malt is a barley malt that is used in the mash. It is possible to substitute corn malt for barley malt by sprouting and grinding the corn. Mixture of water, grain, malt, yeast, and sugar that is allowed to ferment before being distilled into alcohol is referred to as a mash. Peckin’ the Cap– A method that involves tapping on the cap to determine whether or not the mash has boiled into the cap. In the distillation of spirits such as whisky or brandy, a pot still is a type of still that is commonly employed. Heat is applied directly to the pot containing the wash (for whisky) or wine (for brandy) (for brandy). A batch distillation (as opposed to a continuous distillation) is what is being described here. In distillation, pot-tail is defined as the “slop” of fruit or grain that remains after the alcohol has been distilled out of it. Known as “thumper tails” in some circles. Puke is defined as the boiling over of a still. Pumice is a fermented fruit and sugar mixture that is used to manufacture brandy. Moonshiners are targeted by revenuers, who are government agents tasked with apprehending anyone involved in moonshining. Return of condensed vapors to the system from whence they came is referred to as reflux. Reflux Still– This type of still produces a flavorless spirit through the process of refluxing. A runner is a person who transports moonshine. Singlings– Unproofed whiskey that has been through one distillation and will be redistilled
  • Singlings are available in small batches. Steam Outfit– A still that heats the mash within the pot using steam rather than a direct flame
  • Still– The combination of the cap and boiler in which the mash is first distilled
  • Still Cap– The combination of the cap and boiler in which the mash is first distilled Also known as a “still,” this term refers to the whole distillation apparatus. Still Hand– A person who works at a still site
  • A still site worker. Stillhouse– Historically, a tiny permanent structure built exclusively for distilling
  • Today, it is used for many other purposes. Mash Stir Stick– A stick with a fork attached at one end that is used to stir mashed potatoes. Wire is typically used to extend over the fork in a back and forth motion. It is possible to get stuck in fermentation if the yeast goes into dormancy before the fermentation is complete. In contrast to a “arrested fermentation,” in which the winemaker purposefully pauses the fermentation process, Still with a huge capacity that has been in frequent use since the 1920s is known as a submarine still. The submarine is shaped like a low box with two curving ends, although it still has two wooden sides in most cases. A swab stick is a wooden stick with bristles that is used to wipe out a still. A thumper is a piece of equipment located between the boiler and the coil that distills mash and redistills the alcohol that is discharged from the boiler. Informally known as a “doubler,” a “thumper keg,” or a “thumper barrel.” Turnip Still– An old-fashioned still pot with a circular, squat shape
  • It is used for distilling. Worm– A coil of wire immersed in a container filled with water. In the coil, alcoholic-laced steam condenses to form a liquid state. Before utilizing yeast to manufacture beer, a yeast starter is used to stimulate cell activity or increase the number of yeast cells in the starter before using the yeast to make beer. Usually, the yeast will develop in this lesser volume for 1-2 days, after which it may be put to 5 gallons of wort to ferment.
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How To Do a Stripping Run With Your Moonshine Still

You may already be aware that the XXX you see on those old-fashioned jars of moonshine represents the number of times the jug has been passed through the pot still. When you make your first run, it is referred to as a “stripping run,” since its objective is to strip the water, yeast, and sediment out of your mash before you do your second and third runs, which are both referred to as primary distillation (s). When you distill in this manner, you will end up with a smoother finished product. It’s important to note that while conducting a stripping run, you don’t really make any cuts, and it’s usually a very quick run.

Pot Distillation Vs Reflux Distillation

To refresh your memory, we’re talking about the use of pot distillation when performing a stripping operation. Our reflux moonshine stills are all capable of conducting both reflux and pot distillation, so if you had, for example, anEssential Extractor Pro Series II, you would just operate it in pot distillation mode rather of reflux. Because pot distillation allows you to retain all of the tastes and characteristics that you developed during fermentation, whereas reflux distillation removes those flavors and traits, leaving you with a more neutral and flavorless spirit, this is vital to know.

This is totally up to the discretion of the distiller, and is dependent on what he is aiming for in his finished product.

When a product with 40 percent alcohol by volume (80 proof) is heated to 79°F (26°C) and an ignition source is put to it, it can catch fire.

When running a moonshine still, it is critical to be mindful of safety precautions at all times.

How To Do a Stripping Run Step-By-Step

  • First and first, preheat your still
  • As soon as any vapor is formed, begin circulating your cooling water through the condenser. Once the vapor begins to form and the temperature begins to rise, begin collecting your distillate. When comparing the different temperatures, you will not need to make any incisions, as you would with a traditional pot distillation. Bring the collection together until the temperature is around 207°F/208°F (97°C/98°C)
  • Shut off the heat source, but keep the cooling water running until there is no more vapor remaining in the moonshine still.

How To Do a Spirit Run

  • Prepare your still by heating it up. Before any vapor is formed, begin circulating your cooling water through the condenser. Begin collecting your distillate as soon as the vapor begins to form and the temperature rises. When comparing the different temperatures, you will not need to make any incisions, as you would with a traditional pot distillation. Bring the collection together until the temperature is around 207°F/208°F (97°C/98°C). Shut down your heat source, but keep the cooling water running until there is no more vapor remaining in the moonshine still.
  • You should turn off your heat source, but keep the cooling water running until you’re certain there is no vapor remaining in the moonshine still.

Methanol – Will Moonshine Make You Blind?

When a commercial distiller manufactures moonshine (such as Ole’ Smokey or Sugarlands), a very serious safety risk is the possibility of manufacturing a deadly substance. In contrast to popular belief, professionally produced moonshine will not cause blindness or death or even a nasty hangover if some simple safety steps are observed and followed. What may cause someone to become blind from drinking moonshine will be discussed in greater detail in the following article, which will also show how a professional distiller can be absolutely, certainly, 100 percent certain that this will not happen.

Our distillation apparatus is intended solely for legal reasons, and the information contained in this paper is intended solely for educational purposes. We encourage you to read our comprehensive legal statement for further information on the legality of distillation.

Methanol Toxicity

When it comes to moonshine, the dangerous stuff to look out for is methyl alcohol (methanol) (or any distilled spirit for that matter). Purified methanol is extremely hazardous, and it has been proven to cause blindness and even death in some cases. Pure methanol at concentrations as low as 10 mL can cause blindness, and as high as 30 mL can cause death in severe cases. A shot glass holds 30 milliliters of liquid, which is the same quantity of liquid as 30 milliliters.

How is Methanol Produced?

Methanol can be found in naturally occurring quantities in various fruits and vegetables. It is also possible that it will be created as an accidental consequence of the fermentation process. methanol is more likely to be found in spirits distilled from fruits such as apples, oranges, and grapes than in others. Methanol may be found in small amounts in both beer and wine. According to studies, wine may contain as much as 329 mg/L of alcohol, whereas lager may have as little as 16 mg/L of alcohol.

Why is Methanol A Concern for Distillers?

So why is wine possibly unsafe to consume after it has been distilled, even if it contains methanol and does not represent a risk of methanol poisoning? The distinction is that the methanol concentration in a given amount of wine (say, 5 gallons) is uniformly distributed across the whole volume of wine. More than 5 gallons, or 28 bottles, would be required for someone to drink a quantity that may be considered potentially harmful. Because methanol has a lower boiling point than ethanol and water, it is concentrated at the beginning of the distillation process.

Methyl alcohol has a boiling point of around 148 degrees Fahrenheit, which is much lower than that of ethanol (the good stuff).

This is why professional distillers always discard the very first drop of shine that they make from each manufacturing run they undertake (more on this below).

  • There could be as much as 8 milliliters of methyl alcohol in the first jar after distilling 5 gallons of wine with the abovementioned methanol concentration (329 mg/L), which could be potentially hazardous in high concentrations
  • If the wine contained the abovementioned methanol concentration (329 mg/L) and was distilled, there could be as much as 5 gallon of methyl alcohol in the first jar after distilling
  • If you scale this up to a 100-gallon batch that is distilled all at the same time in a large still, a commercial distiller may possibly be in for a very huge problem if the methanol is not dumped during the process. The distillation of 100 gallons of wine with 329 mg/L of methanol might result in a concentration of 40ml of methanol, which could be lethal if consumed in its whole
  • Nevertheless, it is not recommended.

How to Remove Methanol from Moonshine

The temperature of the still is one manner in which a professional distiller may assess whether or not methanol is present. methanol is created by the still if anything is produced by the still before the wash temperature reaches 174 degrees. It will be discarded by a commercial distiller. Again, methanol boils at a lower temperature than ethanol and will concentrate at the start of the distillation process, just as it did previously. Commercial distillers have also discovered that just dumping a set quantity of product every batch, dependent on the batch size, is sufficient to keep things safe.

When distilling wash, the rule of thumb is to discard 1/3 of a pint jar for every 5 gallons of wash that is being produced. How much of the first product should be discarded:

  • 1 gallon batch – discard the first 2/3 of a shot glass from the beginning of the batch
  • 5 gallon batch – discard the first 1/3 of a pint jar from the beginning of the batch
  • In a ten gallon batch, discard the first 3/4 of a pint jar of the mixture.

It’s a good idea to always follow this rule of thumb, regardless of the current temperature. Even though the first batch does not include methanol, the first batch that comes out of the still tastes and smells like rubbing alcohol. Nobody will be impressed by this, as it is by far the weakest material produced over the whole course of the show. It is impossible for a professional distiller to consume or sell the first product generated by a still. For more detail on this subject, please see our article ” Making Moonshine – The Dummies’ Guide “.

Check out the 10 most critical safety recommendations for distillers for much more information about safety.

Still Types and Techniques

Still Styles and Methods of DistillationDiana Yates2019-09-11T17:14:44+00:00Moonshining has traditionally been a family affair, with skills being passed down from one generation to the next.The Ingram family proudly posed with their turnip still as liquor poured out of the condenser in Franklin County, Virginia, in 1929.When the cap of foam has disappeared, the mash is ready to be distilled. It is possible for the moonshiner to assess how far the fermentation process has progressed by touching the froth or “breaking up the cap.” Blue Ridge Mountains, about 1970s in Virginia.

  1. The flake stand, which is the box on the right, is filled with water and contains the copper worm, which is responsible for condensing the alcohol.
  2. In the 1960s, the Blue Ridge Mountains of Virginia were photographed.
  3. A cap blowing off or a boiler bursting might cause surrounding motionless hands to be scalded by the steam and mash that is released.
  4. Patrick County, Virginia, in the early twentieth century.

It is necessary to boil water in the horizontal boiler (far left) in order to force steam through two pipes and into the mash-filled “pot” when operating the still (center left). 1982, the Blue Ridge Mountains of Virginia, page loading link

Throw Away the First Cut: Popcorn Sutton & the Chemistry of Moonshine

Still Styles and Methods of DistillationDiana Yates2019-09-11T17:14:44+00:00Moonshining has traditionally been a family affair, with skills being passed down from one generation to the next.The Ingram family proudly posed with their turnip still as liquor poured out of the condenser in Franklin County, Virginia, in 1929.When the cap of foam has disappeared, mash is ready to be distilled. When the moonshiner feels the froth or “breaks up the cap,” he or she may identify how far along the fermentation process has progressed.

The Turnip StillKnown for its squatty turnip-shaped boiler (often referred to as the “pot”), the turnip still has been around for centuries.It was used in the Blue Ridge until the 1930s, but few, if any, area bootleggers today have ever seen a turnip still in operation.American turnip boilers were traditionally made of copper sheets hammered into shape and riveted and soldered together.Coiled copper “worm” con Turnip-style boiler in the foreground is located exactly behind the mash barrel in the background.

A container on the right, the flake stand, is filled with water and contains the copper worm, which is responsible for condensing the alcohol in the flake stand.

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Around 1960, the Blue Ridge Mountains of Virginia were a popular destination for tourists.

The Blue Ridge Mountains of Virginia, circa 1960s.After the mash has fermented into “beer,” the bootlegger heats the boiler, usually with gas or oil burners, and stirs the mash.When the mash approaches distillation temperature, the cap is secured atop the boiler with a chain, wire, or weight.The alcohol vapors travel from the boiler through the cap and into a “doubler,” which is a barrel that has been filled with weak whiskey or Approximately 1900, Patrick County, Virginia The Steam Still Though not as common as the turnip and submarine stills, the steam still has also been used by Blue Ridge moonshiners.Steam stills are constructed in a variety of ways, but the basic concept is the same in each.A boiler containing water is heated, and the resulting steam is either released directly into fermented mash or piped through the mash.The mash boils, and the alcohol vapors pass into a water-cooled worm (or In this scene, revenue agents dressed in a steam suit are demolishing the worm and flake booth.

It is necessary to boil water in the horizontal boiler (far left) in order to force steam via two pipes and into the mash-filled “pot” when the still is in operation (center left). 1982 in the Blue Ridge Mountains of Virginia, page load link.

How to “Cut” your Alcohol Distilling Run

Still Types and TechniquesDiana Yates2019-09-11T17:14:44+00:00Moonshining has traditionally been a family affair, with skills being passed down from one generation to the next.The Ingram family proudly posed with their turnip still as liquor poured out of the condenser in Franklin County, Virginia, in 1929.When the cap of foam has disappeared, the mash is ready to be distilled. When the moonshiner feels the froth or “breaks up the cap,” he or she may identify how far along the fermentation process has progressed.

The Turnip StillKnown for its squatty turnip-shaped boiler (often referred to as the “pot”), the turnip still has been around for centuries.It was used in the Blue Ridge until the 1930s, but few, if any, area bootleggers today have ever seen one still in operation.American turnip boilers were traditionally made of copper sheets hammered into shape and riveted and soldered together.Coiled copper “worm” condensers were Directly behind the mash barrel in the foreground is a turnip-style boiler.

The flake stand, which is the box on the right, is filled with water and contains the copper worm, which is responsible for condensing the ethanol.

(This concoction is quite different from store-bought beer, but some people do drink it.) The beer is poured into the turnip-shaped “pot,” and the distiller starts his fire.

In the 1960s, the Blue Ridge Mountains of Virginia were in full bloom.

The Blue Ridge Mountains of Virginia, circa 1960s.After the mash has fermented into “beer,” the bootlegger heats the boiler, usually with gas or oil burners, and stirs the mash.When the mash reaches distillation temperature, the cap is secured atop the boiler with a chain, wire, or weight.The alcohol vapors travel from the boiler through the cap and into a “doubler,” which is a barrel that has been filled with weak whiskey or Patrick County, Virginia, around the year 1900.

The Steam Still Though not as common as the turnip and submarine stills, the steam still has also been used by Blue Ridge moonshiners.Steam stills are made by heating water in a boiler, and the resulting steam is either released directly into fermented mash or piped through the mash.The mash boils, and the alcohol vapors pass into a water-cooled worm (or a thumper keg and then a worm).

It is necessary to boil water in the horizontal boiler (far left) in order to force steam through two pipes and into the mash-filled “pot” when running the still (center left). 1982 in the Blue Ridge Mountains of Virginia, page load link

The Four Stages of Your Moonshine Run

Some old wives’ tales claim that moonshine would “make you go blind.” You may have heard something similar. Despite the fact that this is an exaggeration, it is true that moonshine that has not been properly prepared might make you sick. Read our guide on how to distill whiskey and moonshine to acquire a better understanding of the safety precautions you should take at every stage of the process. Keep an eye out for the different types of alcohols that are created during the various phases of your moonshine production so that you can avoid establishing a bad reputation for your moonshine by selling it to those who think it’s harmful.

Even if you need to use numerous containers for each stage of the run, this is OK.

The Foreshots

At each stage of the race, different types of alcohol are vaporized and sucked into a collection cup at the finish line. Fine, high-quality moonshine is made from ethanol, which boils at a temperature of 175 degrees Fahrenheit when heated to a boiling point. The boiling point of other chemicals and alcohols, such as methanol, is much lower, and the resulting condensed liquid will gather in your cup or jar after being condensed in the coil. These compounds are extremely toxic. The presence of these contaminants in your moonshine (or whatever alcohol you’re distilling) will not only degrade the flavor of your product, but they may also make people very unwell.

If you reach this temperature, the ethanol in the wash will begin to evaporate, and you may be confident that the distillate collected before this point includes the majority of the methanol and other hazardous chemicals.

In this initial container, you will find all of the distillate that has been gathered before your run reaches this certain temperature.

Making the incision a bit later rather than early ensures that all of the potentially harmful substances are removed from the process.

The Heads

You will be distilling actual spirits as the temperature continues to rise. Even though the temperature in the still’s pot is rising to between 175 and 185 degrees Fahrenheit, the distillate will still contain significant amounts of non-ethanol chemicals that can be used to give your final product a bit more “bite” and flavor if used in conjunction with other ingredients such as spices. This may be great for a product such as whiskey or Scotch, because the complexity of those alcoholic beverages is derived from the mixing of several trace compounds.

The temperature range for the second cut you will make in your run will be between 185 and 190 degrees Fahrenheit.

Make a note of the heads and save them away for future distillation, or blend the appropriate quantity with the final distillate to flavor the alcohol to your liking.

The heads should account for around 20-30 percent of the overall amount of money you spend on your run. The optimal strategy is to make this cut a bit later rather than earlier, and to gather some of the hearts with your heads rather than the other way around.

The Hearts

The distillate with the highest concentration of ethanol is the most desirable section of the run. This phase of your run is referred to as the “hearts” section. Many professionals and long-time distillers agree that this is the section of the run that takes place between around 190 degrees Fahrenheit and approximately 200 or 205 degrees Fahrenheit, respectively. Without a doubt, it is dependent on the still. Despite the fact that ethanol has a boiling point of 175 degrees Fahrenheit, the mash in your still does not contain pure ethanol.

The hearts will most likely account for about 30 percent or so of the overall amount of your booze run’s ultimate tally.

In this case, it is preferable to combine some hearts with your tails rather than some tails with your hearts.

The Tails

When the temperature of the run hits around 205 degrees Fahrenheit, it is possible that more steam will enter your distillate. There may also be other compounds present in the distillate that burn at a higher temperature than ethanol, which might impart a flavor to this component of the distillate that isn’t precisely what you were looking for. This section of the run is referred to as the “tails,” and it can account for as much as 20-30 percent of your entire distance. Remove the tails and set them aside for further distillation.

It is safe to cut off the heat source for your still after the temperature in the pot of your still hits 212 degrees.

Continue to collect whatever distillate comes out of the condenser coil, but it is not worth it to boil the water in order to extract every drop of alcohol from the alcohol wash, since this would waste time and energy.

Allow your still to cool completely before disassembling, cleaning, and storing it in preparation for your next use.

The “Feints”

Fients are the containers containing heads and tails that you have set aside for later use in the process. In this case, you may either add them to the wash with your next run or distill them separately from the rest of the brew. It is possible to distill the feints in a smaller-size still after each alcohol run if you do not want to combine different recipes or tastes from separate mashes. After collecting feints for several runs, some people perform an all-feints run in a bigger still; this is known as the “queen’s share” of feint collection.

When it comes to learning the particular qualities of your still that will inform you when to cut your alcohol run, it may take some time and trial and error.

This will help you repeat successful runs and figure out where you went wrong in a batch that wasn’t up to your standards the next time around.

Follow the rules, practice safe distillation, and learn how to get the most hearts out of each batch, and you’ll be able to sip your moonshine with a grin on your face. Jim Thomas contributed to this article. Luann Snider Photography provided the image for this post.

How Moonshine Works

The “feints” allude to the containers of heads and tails that you have stored away for later. In this case, you may either add them to the wash with your next run or distill them separately from the rest of the mash. It is possible to distill the feints in a smaller-sized still after each alcohol run if you do not want to combine different recipes or tastes from separate mashes. After collecting feints for several runs, some people perform an all-feints run in a bigger still, which is known as the “queen’s share” of feint collection.

  1. When it comes to learning the specific qualities of your still that will inform you when to cut your alcohol run, it may take some time and trial and error.
  2. This will help you repeat successful runs and figure out where you went wrong in a batch that wasn’t up to your standards.
  3. You’ll be able to sip your moonshine with a grin if you follow the rules, perform safe distillation, and learn to maximize the hearts in each run.
  4. Luann Snider Photography provided the image for this piece.

A Brief History of Moonshine

Finding and drinking moonshine is considered a rite of passage in the Southern United States. With its rebellious past and deadly image, moonshine has secured a position in popular culture as a result of its presence in the country’s history. When it comes to whiskey or other powerful alcoholic beverages that are created and sold illegally, moonshine is defined by the Oxford English Dictionary as follows: As a result of this classification, it may be perplexing to walk into a liquor store (or Costco) and see drink that has been classified as moonshine.

  • Unlike whiskey, which must be prepared from grain, distilled and bottled at a specific alcohol concentration, and matured in oak barrels,’shine does not have a comparable product in the marketplace.
  • There is no upper limit to the amount of alcohol in this drink, unlike vodka.
  • As a result, despite what you might have read in the Oxford English Dictionary, legally produced booze called “moonshine” can be found all over the world.
  • The word moonshine has been in use since the late 15th century, but it was only in the 18th century that it was first used to refer to alcoholic beverages in England.
  • When grain mills were operating at the time, farmers who had extra produce would distill it in order to keep it from spoiling.
  • The “whiskey tax,” as it was known at the time, was imposed by the federal government on liquor produced within the country in 1791.
  • marshal to Pennsylvania to collect the taxes owed.
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Their leader was assassinated, which sparked a massive demonstration that drew approximately 6000 people.

There is a lot of truth to the folklore and legends around moonshine.

Despite the fact that some moonshiners say that these stories were published in an effort to discredit their work, legitimate producers are of the opposite opinion.

Don’t make the mistake of conflating moonshiners with bootleggers.

The termbootlegger originally referred to the practice of concealing flasks in the boot tops of automobiles in the 1880s, but with the development of automobiles, it came to apply to anybody who smuggled alcoholic beverages.

During their time spent evading the cops, these whiskey runners picked up some serious driving talents.

NASCAR and moonshiners were so intertwined, in fact, that a moonshiner provided seed money to Bill France, the organization’s founder.

After inheriting the fortune of his father, who was an infamous moonshiner, this former driver and NASCAR team owner recently teamed up with a North Carolina distillery to create “Midnight Moon.” No matter what you choose to call it—moonshine, white lightning, firewater, skullpop, mountain dew, or just moonshine—its rebellious past and controversial present make it a terrible drink.

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How to Make Moonshine: A Distillers Guide Corn Moonshine

This book is a distillers’ guide to making moonshine. Moonshine made with corn

How to Make Moonshine:A Distillers Guide For Corn Moonshine

The most recent update was made on October 25, 2021.

Getting Started: Picking Your Type of Moonshine Mash

On October 25, 2021, the most recent update was performed.

How to Make Moonshine: Corn Mash Recipe

  • A five-gallon bucket of water, 8.5 pounds of flaked corn maize, 1.5 pounds of crushed malted barley, yeast, a mash pot, a fermenting bucket, a heat source, a thermometer, and a long spoon.

Procedure:

  1. Start by placing your mash pot on a heat source and filling it with 5 liters of water
  2. Heat the water to 165 degrees Fahrenheit. After reaching 165 degrees Fahrenheit, turn off the fire and quickly whisk in 8.5 pounds of flaked corn maize. Continue to stir the mixture constantly for 7 minutes. Check the temperature every 5 minutes and stir the mixture for 30 seconds each time until the temperature reaches 152 °F. When the liquid has cooled to 152 degrees Fahrenheit, add 1.5 pounds of Crushed Malted Barley and stir well. Check the temperature every 20 minutes and whisk for 30 seconds until the mixture has cooled to 70 degrees Fahrenheit. It takes many hours for this process to complete on its own, however the addition of an immersion chiller can dramatically shorten this timeframe. When the liquid has cooled to 70 degrees Fahrenheit, add the yeast. Allow for 5 minutes of aeration by pouring the mixture back and forth between two different containers. Fill the fermentation bucket halfway with the mixture. We provide entire kits for them as well as the supplies you’ll need to make them yourself. It is critical to have the bucket, cap, and air-lock on hand at all times. The use of a spigot also makes pouring more convenient.

George Duncan over at Barley and Hops Brewing also has a great video onHow To Make a Great Moonshine Mash.Check it out below!

Preheat the mash pot on the stovetop over medium heat and add 5 liters of water; Bring water to a temperature of 165 degrees Fahrenheit. After reaching 165 degrees Fahrenheit, turn off the heat and whisk in 8.5 pounds of flaked corn maize right away. Continually stir the mixture for seven minutes. In order to reach 152 degrees Fahrenheit, check the temperature every five minutes and stir the liquid for 30 seconds; Add 1.5 pounds of Crushed Malted Barley when the mixture has cooled to 152 degrees Fahrenheit.

  • It takes many hours for this process to complete on its own, however the addition of an immersion chiller can substantially shorten this time frame.
  • Fill two separate containers halfway with the mixture and dump it back and forth for five minutes.
  • The ingredients to make your own may be found in our store, as well as entire kits.
  • Pouring is also made easier with a spigot.
  • PH Meter (Advanced)
  • Siphon
  • Cheese Cloth
  • Citric Acid
  • And other supplies.

Fermentation

Store the mash at room temperature for 1-2 weeks to let it to ferment. The temperature is critical because if the temperature drops too low, the fermentation will halt since the yeast will become dormant. Make use of a hydrometer and verify the specific gravity at the beginning of fermentation and at the end of fermentation to confirm that all sugars have been used. This will tell you how much ABV (alcohol by volume) was created throughout your fermentation. Make a note of the specific gravity readings taken at the commencement of fermentation and at the conclusion of the fermentation process.

Watch this video to learn how to operate a hydrometer.

Straining

To correct pH, carefully siphon mash water out of the mixture, making sure to leave behind all solid material and sediment. Pour the mash water into a container and set it aside. It is advised that you strain the mashed potatoes through a cheesecloth at this point. The presence of solid debris in your mash water might result in headaches that you’d want to avoid. (Advanced) This is the stage at which some distillers may add 2 teaspoons of gypsum to their mash water. After that, they do a pH test on their mash water.

Use citric acid to lower the pH of the water, then calcium carbonate to raise it again.

How To Make Moonshine: Distilling

  • Fermented and strained mash water, cleaning products, and column packing are all used in the production of whiskey.

You did an excellent job! You’ve finished the hard work of making mash water for your moonshine! Congratulations! Finally, distillation and separation of all of the alcohol content into a refined form are required. Similarly to the process of creating mash, distillation is both an art and a science. Exercising your distilling skills is the most effective method to improve. We encourage that you take notes during the procedure so that you can improve with each subsequent run. In the event that you are in need of equipment or supplies, we can help you out.

We have everything from the traditionalcopper still to steel reflux units to the newGrainfatherBrewing System, and everything in between. We also carry high-quality supplies, such as high-quality grains and a new carbon filter, among other things.

Prepping Your Still

Maintaining a consistent level of preparation for your still is essential. However, even if you cleaned and let your still to sit for a bit after your last run, it is still advised that you clean it before transferring your mash water. This is especially true for copper stills that have a salt deposit on their surfaces. If you want to include packing in your column, now is the time. Fill your column with the amount of copper packing that is appropriate for your particular arrangement and use it as a filter.

Last but not least, it’s time to fill the still with your mash water.

The goal here is to reduce the amount of sediment in your mash water to as near to zero as you possibly can.

Running Your Still

Now comes the exciting part! Distillation is a fantastic procedure that takes a long time. Those of you who are unfamiliar with the science may get the fast and dirty version by clicking on the link below. When distinct compounds are separated using distillation, it is done so by taking advantage of the differences in evaporation temperatures of the substances. Rather of producing alcohol, this procedure separates it from the rest of the components present in your mash water. During the fermentation process, you produced all of the alcohol (well, the yeast did).

If your arrangement includes a condenser, switch on the condensing water whenever the temperature reaches 150 degrees Fahrenheit.

Keep track of how fast your drips are increasing in pace until you reach 3 to 5 drips per second.

How To Make Moonshine: Collecting Your Distillate

It’s time to get to the good stuff. Awe-inspiring is the process of distillation. Those of you who are unfamiliar with the science can get the fast and dirty version. When various compounds are separated using distillation, it is done so by taking advantage of the difference in evaporation temperatures between the substances. Rather of producing alcohol, this procedure separates it from the rest of the constituents in your mashwater. During fermentation, you produced all of the alcohol (well, the yeast did).

If your arrangement includes a condenser, switch on the condensing water when the temperature reaches 150 degrees Fahrenheit.

Keep track of how fast your drips are increasing in pace until you reach 3 to 5 drips per second or faster. As soon as you’ve reached this pace, turn the heat down to keep it there (typically to the “medium” position).

Collecting Foreshots

In terms of percentage of your total productivity, the foreshots will account for around 5 percent. These are the alcohols that evaporate the earliest in your mash water and should never be consumed. Foreshots may contain methanol, and they should never be taken in any form. Methanol, among other things, has the potential to cause blindness. Gather the foreshots and place them in a separate container before throwing them away.

Collecting Heads

It is estimated that the heads account for around 30 percent of your total production. The heads, like the foreshots, contain volatile alcohols as well as other compounds. However, rather than causing blindness, the consequences are more mild – akin to having a bad hangover for many days. Because to the presence of alcohols such as acetone, the heads will have a characteristic “solvent” scent to them. Similarly to the foreshots, place your heads in their own containers and discard the rest of them.

Collecting Hearts

This is the good stuff, which is primarily composed of ethanol. The following approximately 30 percent of your total production is comprised of the hearts. You should be able to smell the harsh, solvent-like scent that was present during the heads at this stage. The flavor of corn mash moonshine should now be smooth and sweet, as it should have been previously. This is the level at which ability and experience are most important. It takes a certain amount of skill to keep your hearts well-isolated while simultaneously increasing their output.

Collecting Tails

When you reach the conclusion of the ethanol process and enter the final step of your manufacturing process, you reach the tails. It is estimated that the tails will account for around 35% of your total production. The tails will have a completely distinct flavor from the hearts. You’ll notice a significant decrease in sweetness, and you may even see an oily top-layer on your product at this point. The substance will start to feel slick between your fingertips at this point. This is because to the presence of water, carbs, and proteins.

Conclusion

The tails occur when you reach the conclusion of the ethanol process and enter the last step of your manufacturing process. It is estimated that the tails will account for around 35% of your total manufacturing output. The tails will have a completely different flavor than the hearts will have. A significant reduction in sweetness will be noticed, and an oily top-layer will begin to appear on your product. Between your fingertips, the product will begin to feel slick. As a result of the presence of water, carbs, and proteins.

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