Categories Moonshine

What Show’s Storyline Included Old Ladies, A Secret Room And Moonshine? (Question)

What was the plot of the movie room?

  • Held captive for 7 years in an enclosed space, a woman and her young son finally gain their freedom, allowing the boy to experience the outside world for the first time. ROOM tells the extraordinary story of Jack, a spirited 5-year-old who is looked after by his loving and devoted mother.

Did Mike and Jerry from moonshiners get busted?

There are no reports of Mike and Jerry from ‘Moonshiners’ getting busted. Some moonshiners have gotten busted in the past — most famously, Popcorn Sutton, who took his own life a few years before Moonshiners was produced, though his legacy lives on.

How much does Discovery Channel pay the cast of moonshiners?

“[The show] just brought it to national attention, so it’s growing every day.” Their income plus the $30,000 they are reportedly paid per episode is guaranteed to ensure that they won’t be going out of business anytime soon.

How many episodes of moonshine are there?

Production on the eight-episode second season recently wrapped in Nova Scotia and is set to premiere on CBC in fall 2022, with the entire first season now available to stream on CBC Gem.

What happened to Jim Tom on Moonshiners?

So, did Jim Tom on ‘Moonshiners’ die? Nope. Jim Tom, 80, has gone legitimate (for the most part) when it comes to the making and distribution of his famous “Unaged Rye.” He has teamed up with Mark and Digger to create the Sugarlands Distilling Co., where he is featured on the company’s website.

Is Digger from Moonshiners married?

While Mark and Digger have no problem putting their illegal business in front of cameras, the same can’t be said for their personal life. It is well-known that Mark is married – his wife has been spotted by fans at moonshine-related events — but very little is known about his real-life partner.

Who is the richest moonshiner?

Moonshiners Tim Smith net worth: Tim Smith is an American moonshiner and reality television personality who has a net worth of $150 thousand dollars.

Did digger from moonshiners get busted?

So why don’t moonshiners get arrested, then? As far as any official police reports or news outlets are concerned, there is no proof that Digger has ever been arrested in relation to moonshining.

Is Josh from moonshiners sick?

Josh says that his left collarbone is still “sticking out” and that his left side was “pretty well paralyzed” after the accident. He was also dealing with severe pain, but was thankful for all of the work that the hospital and the staff was doing to give him care.

Where is the series moonshine filmed?

The series stars Jennifer Finnigan as Lidia Bennet, daughter of Ken and Bea Finley-Cullen played by Peter MacNeill and Corrine Koslo, the owners of a ramshackle summer resort on the south shore of Nova Scotia who are keen to retire but whose adult children are battling for control.

What happened to Josh and Bill’s underground still site?

Josh and Bill’s above-ground still malfunctions, ending their season, but they find that their underground site is now mold-free and ready to use during the winter.

Where is moonshine filmed?

The entirety of Moonshine was filmed in Hubbards, Nova Scotia, Canada. It is one of the thirteen provinces of Canada. Fun fact, Hubbards is an unincorporated rural community that is just on the South Shore of Nova Scotia.

“The Andy Griffith Show” Alcohol and Old Lace (TV Episode 1961)

  • While manufacturing moonshine has been done successfully for many years, getting it exactly perfect may be a daunting and tough endeavor to do. However, being well-prepared with the appropriate equipment and information will considerably assist the process in producing the finest outcomes. The process of manufacturing moonshine takes a combination of science and creativity in order to produce a strong batch of corn whiskey that is both sweet and smooth. Making the ideal batch will become second nature after little experience.
  • It has been done effectively for years, but getting the recipe just right may be a daunting and challenging undertaking. However, in order to get the greatest outcomes, being well-prepared with the appropriate tools and information will considerably assist the process. Generating moonshine involves a little bit of science and a little bit of creativity to effectively drive you towards making a strong batch of corn-whiskey that is sweet and smooth. With enough experience, you will be able to produce the ideal batch every every time.

When it comes to tracking down local moonshiners, Barney and Andy don’t give the small, elderly Morrison sisters a second thought, but they should.

  • Trivia In 1961, the 27th of October was designated as National Potato Day (rather than National Potato Week).
  • Goofs In the Sheriff’s Office, when Opie brings flowers in, the arrangement is on the tiny side. When he comes from the back room, where he had gone to get a new vase, he discovers that he has added many more flowers to the arrangement.
  • Quotes Andy Taylor (interviewer): Now, Barney, I have my doubts about Otis’s willingness to engage in conversation. He seemed to be hell-bent on not assisting us. Otis Campbell (Otis Campbell): Andy, I wish I could, but it’s an issue of ethics that prevents me from doing so. We town drunks have a set of rules that we follow
  • Alternate variants are available. A generic instrumental music substitutes the famous Andy Griffith Show theme song on the Raintree Home Video DVDs distributed in the United States.

Variations on a theme A generic instrumental music substitutes the famous Andy Griffith Show theme song on the Raintree Home Video DVDs that have been issued.

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At the time I originally started down this rabbit-hole, the main topic that piqued my attention was: Can there be such a thing as legal moonshine? It was a question I didn’t know whether I’d ever be able to find an answer to, or if there even was an answer. It didn’t appear to me that there could be any by definition. In practice, though, it is possible simply because there is already something to be found. Kevin R. Kosar writes in Moonshines: A Global History that since Ole Smoky virtually invented the moonshine business in 2009 in eastern Tennessee, hundreds of legal moonshine producers have popped up all over the world.

  • International distribution, three branded and tourable distilleries, and “more than 20 innovative flavors made from the traditional family recipe” are all part of Ole Smoky’s current offering.
  • It was considered unwise to speak when you were younger because of the ramifications of doing so.
  • Ole Smoky’s “pure” shine is barely 80 proof, which would probably be more objectionable to old-school shiners than the high amount of sugar in the drink.
  • All of these brands have some connection to the tradition of making it “like they used to.” That is not uncommon in the booze industry, which has long distorted the truth.
  • Isn’t this a complete contradiction in terms?
  • With the idea of legal cooperation, I envisioned the old timers scoffing, as if they had lost their wildness and were being robbed of it.
  • “Well,” he responded slowly, pausing to consider my question carefully “We have a strong storytelling tradition in our organization.
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That is moonshine, by the way.

With beer and wine, you don’t get quite the same effect.

That’s a big part of the appeal.

Twenty-dollar jars dug up from the backyard are no longer sufficient to cover the expenses.

To become bigger, you have to sell more, and in order to sell more you have to be on the radar.

To put it another way, the advantages of being legal outweigh the disadvantages of losing your credibility.

Instead of trying to get away from the law, he has a say in how it is applied.

“They’ve been extremely supportive of distilleries in our state – long before other states followed their lead.” You get the impression that they want this to assist showcase a piece of our culture.” In addition, he has just developed a virus-age invention.

Shortly after he began, he received a call from the IRS, who asked him to supply 300 gallons of hand sanitizer each month for six months under contract.

He and Taylor used to just do 50 gallons of spirits each month, and the increased demand forced them to establish a warehouse down the street to keep up with the demand.

Smith said he was happy to provide jobs for more than 30 unemployed residents in the area.

Due of Price’s adherence to the law, he is considered something of an outlier in some regions of West Virginia.

Moonshine, he believes, may be attracted to people because of this concept as well.

Additionally, they like the memories.

“It was manufactured in violation of the law, and therefore…

(And who also happen to have a very good shine on their shoes.) Burns seems to agree with this statement.

Because of the circumstances, moonshiners haven’t been able to do so up until now.” The traditions continue on – in the taste of genuine shine distilled first and foremost for pride rather than profit, in the warm glow created by hours of laborious effort.

“The individual got it from their uncle, who got it from his cousin, who got it from his friend – it’s exactly like that.” “It only goes to demonstrate how much love goes into making a bottle of wine.” “You’re tasting the earth, the distiller himself, and his labour,” says the distiller.

“When they see something like this, they want to be given a tale.” “This is especially true now.”

A Girl Named Sooner – Wikipedia

A Girl Named Sooner
Genre Drama
Based on A Girl Named Soonerby Suzanne Clauser
Screenplay by Suzanne Clauser
Directed by Delbert Mann
Starring Susan DeerLee RemickRichard CrennaCloris LeachmanDon Murray
Music by Jerry Goldsmith
Country of origin United States
Original language English
Production
Executive producer Frederick H. Brogger
Producers Fred HamiltonJames Franciscus
Production locations Switzerland County, IndianaVevay, Indiana
Cinematography Ralph Woolsey
Editor Jack W. Holmes
Running time 85 minutes
Production companies 20th Century Fox TelevisionFrederick Brogger AssociatesOmnibus Productions
Distributor NBC
Release
Original network NBC
Picture format Color
Audio format Mono
Original release June 18, 1975

Upon entering this rabbit hole, the first question that piqued my curiosity was: Is it possible to make legal moonshine? It was a question I didn’t know whether or not I would be able to find an answer to, or if there even was an answer to. There couldn’t possibly be any, according to my understanding. On the contrary, in actuality, there may be just because there is already one. Following the creation of the legal moonshine industry in eastern Tennessee by Ole Smoky in 2009, as Kevin R. Kosar writes inMoonshine: A Global History, dozens of legal moonshine distilleries have sprung up.

  1. International distribution, three branded and tourable distilleries, and “more than 20 innovative flavors made from the traditional family recipe” are now available from Ole Smoky.
  2. These days, though, those days are over, and it’s difficult not to boast when you’re making and selling Ole Smoky Moonshine.
  3. Even if Ole Smoky’s “pure” shine is just 80 proof, it would be more objectionable to traditional shiners than the high sugar content.
  4. All of these brands have some connection to making it “like they used to.” Liquor marketing has a long history of stretching the truth, so this isn’t surprising.
  5. Why does this seem like an absurdity?
  6. With the idea of legal cooperation, I envisioned the old timers scoffing, as if they were losing their wildness and being forced to work with the government.
  7. “Well,” he responded slowly, pausing to think about it.

” You’ve heard the expression, ‘Never let the truth get in the way of a good narrative,’ haven’t you?

An undercurrent of suspicion permeates the atmosphere.

Of course, we’ve made it clear that that’s part of the tale.

You’re going to have to leap the shark at some time, though.” No longer do twenty-dollar jars of honey from the back yard suffice to cover the costs.

So, in order to grow, you must sell more, and in order to sell more, you must be on the radar, and if you are on the radar, you will get busted at some time.” To put it another way, the advantages of being legal outweigh the disadvantages of losing your reputation.

As opposed to running from the law, he has an impact on it through his political connections.

‘They’ve been tremendously supportive of distilleries in our state – long before other states joined in.” You get the impression that they want this to assist showcase a component of our culture.” Another recent virus-age invention is one of his most recent achievements.

Shortly after he started, he received a call from the IRS, who asked him to supply 300 gallons of hand sanitizer per month for six months under contract.

He and Taylor used to just produce 50 gallons of spirits each month, but the increased demand forced them to establish a warehouse down the street in order to keep up with the increased demand.

His words: “This is a collaborative effort.” Due to Price’s willingness to follow the law, he is considered something of an outlier in some regions of West Virginia.

If we do tastings in Washington, there is still a stigma linked to some of the products.

They also like the nostalgic atmosphere.

As a result, it was produced illegally…

In the end, he believes that the availability of legal moonshine improves its reputation, particularly among small-batch distillers such as himself and the Kings County Distillery in New York, whose former operators are friends of Price’s and assisted him in getting his business off the ground in the first place.

“I believe that having your name associated with something you’re proud of carries with it a great deal of respect and honor.

“When you go to Black Draft, it’s exactly like that,” Burns explained.

” “With something like this, people want to be given a tale.” Today, more than ever.”

Plot

The plot is set in the 1930s in the small town of Vevay, Indiana, and focuses on the titular character, Sooner, a little girl of unknown paternity who is being raised by an elderly backwoods lady named Old Mam Hawes (Cloris Leachman), who makes a fortune by distilling illicit moonshine. Sooner is taken into town by Hawes, who seeks to collect foster care monies for the child she has raised, but her value as a guardian is called into doubt by the Sheriff (Don Murray). Sooner is taken in by a childless couple, Mac and Elizabeth McHenry (Richard Crenna and Lee Remick), in the hopes that having a kid in the house will help Elizabeth get out of her melancholy, which she is suffering from.

  1. Sooner is enthusiastic about the prospect of attending the local high school, and she has already been accepted.
  2. The McHenrys took Sooner in after she had been abandoned by her family for a time.
  3. The youngsters inquire as to why the bird is unable to fly, and she responds that it is because he does not wish to do so.
  4. Elizabeth goes outside to see what is causing the ruckus and is dismayed to see that the bird has died.
  5. Elizabeth dismisses the children and takes Sooner to her own quarters.
  6. During the night, Sooner had returned to her house in Old Mam Hawes, where she had dug up and carried the bird’s corpse along with her.
  7. Elizabeth takes a journey out into the country and comes across the Old Mam Hawes cottage.
  8. A period of time has elapsed.
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Even though Sooner continues to live with Old Mam Hawes, she is informed that the family may go to Florida, where it is “warm all year ’round.” While Hawes is preparing for the yearly fair, Jim Seevey (Michael Gross), to whom Hawes sells her whiskey, arrives and informs her that there will be additional state inspectors at the fair, and thus she will not be able to sell her whiskey bootleg there.

  • Sooner asserts that elderly William is unable to carry the burden, but Hawes is certain in his belief.
  • Sooner is at the fair for the first time.
  • They then embark on the Ferris wheel together, and Sooner becomes unwell as a result of it.
  • As Mac tends to William and pronounces him dead, Sooner agrees that William died in the same way that bird had perished before.
  • Hawes has stated that she has had enough and will be relocating to Florida.

The Sheriff has stated that he would be willing to pay to see it happen. Sooner is yelled at by Hawes, who urges him to stay with the McHenrys. However, after going a short distance away, Hawes is seen glancing back at Sooner. After being reunited, Mac, Elizabeth, and Sooner return to their homes.

Cast

  • Early in the 1930s, the story is set in the small Indiana town of Vevay, and it revolves around the titular character, Sooner, a young girl of unknown parentage who is being raised by an elderly backwoods woman named Old Mam Hawes (Cloris Leachman), who makes a living by distilling illegal moonshine. In order to collect foster care payments for Sooner’s upbringing, Hawes brings Sooner into town, but the Sheriff questions Hawes’ status as a guardian as a result (Don Murray). In the film, Sooner is adopted by Mac and Elizabeth McHenry (Richard Crenna and Lee Remick), a childless couple who believes that having a kid in the house would help Elizabeth get out of her sadness. Sooner and Elizabeth begin to build a strong emotional relationship. Sooner is ecstatic about the prospect of attending the local high school, and she has already been accepted there. Her adjustment to the new environment is uneven at first. The McHenrys took Sooner in after she had been abandoned by her family for a time. Sooner takes home some youngsters from school to show them her pet bird, which she brought with her when she was abandoned by her family. It is because the bird does not wish to fly that she explains to the youngsters why the bird cannot fly. While the children and Sooner try to encourage the bird to fly by stamping on the ground and throwing objects at it, the bird is killed as a consequence of their efforts. Elizabeth goes outside to see what is causing the ruckus and is dismayed to see that the bird has died, as she had anticipated. It appears that Sooner is unmoved by this at first. Elizabeth dismisses the children and takes Sooner to her own room of the house. She discovers Sooner has vanished when she wakes up the next morning. After digging up and transporting the carcass of the bird, Sooner returned to her house with Old Mam Hawes throughout the night. She eventually buries the bird near where she had discovered him and expresses regret for her actions. Old Mam Hawes cottage is discovered when Elizabeth travels out into the country. As soon as Sooner is no longer visible, Hawes reprimands Elizabeth, telling her that she is a far better guardian than Elizabeth and that Sooner should be where she should be at this point in time. After some time has passed, the situation becomes more complicated. After losing Sooner, the McHenrys are experiencing difficulties in their marriage. Even though Sooner continues to live with Old Mam Hawes, she is informed that the couple may go to Florida, where it is “warm all year ’round.” While Hawes is preparing for the yearly fair, Jim Seevey (Michael Gross), to whom Hawes sells her whiskey, arrives and informs her that there will be additional state inspectors at the fair, and thus she will not be able to sell her whiskey bootleg. Hawes drives Seevy out in a passion and orders Sooner to hitch their old horse William to the cart because they want to take the whiskey to the fair and sell it directly to the public themselves. While Sooner asserts that elderly William is unable to cope with the burden, Hawes remains firm. Sooner is at a fair for the first time, and Hawes surprises her by giving her money — something she had never done before – and telling her not to get lost. When Elizabeth notices Sooner buying some cotton candy, she goes over to help him by purchasing some additional food. After that, they all become sick from riding the Ferris wheel together. When they finally return to the horse carriage, they see Hawes there, attempting to lash William into moving, but William succumbs to the pressure. As Mac visits to William and pronounces him dead, Sooner recognizes that William died in the same way that bird had perished earlier. He appears and threatens to detain Old Mam Hawes until she leaves the country. Hawes has stated that she has had enough and will be relocating to the Sunshine State. The Sheriff has stated that he would be willing to pay to see it happen if it were possible. When Sooner refuses to stay with the McHenrys, Hawes yells furiously at him, yet he is observed staring back at him after going a little distance away from him. The three of them return home after reuniting.

Production

It was via a talent hunt that included 300 girls that the young actress who would portray Sooner was discovered. The search took conducted in Indiana, Kentucky, and Ohio. In Cincinnati, Ohio, a final audition was held, and fifty females were chosen. Susan Deer, an 8-year-old from Indianapolis, Indiana, was selected and flew to Hollywood for screen testing and final clearance of the project. Her sole previous job had been as a chimney sweep, and she had no experience with lines. According to legend, Deer’s lone film part was in this picture, and when the film’s production anniversary comes around, she claims to remember absolutely nothing about the making of the movie.

  1. Later, in 1982, he rose to stardom as Steven Keaton on the television series Family Ties.
  2. She went on to appear in a number of more minor appearances, most of which were uncredited, in films such as 28 Days and television programs such as True Blood and Breaking Bad.
  3. It was the first feature film to be shot in the region since the 1958 Frank Sinatra filmSome Came Running was shot there in 1958.
  4. The shots from the fair were filmed during the annual Swiss Wine Festival in Basel, Switzerland.

Release

During a talent hunt that took held in Indiana, Kentucky, and Ohio, the child actress who would portray Sooner was discovered out of 300 girls who applied. In Cincinnati, Ohio, a final audition was held for which fifty females were selected. Susan Deer, an 8-year-old from Indianapolis, Indiana, was selected and flew to Hollywood for screen testing and final approval of her performance. As a chimney sweep with no lines, her only previous experience was limited to that. According to legend, Deer’s lone film part was in this picture, and when the film’s production anniversary comes around, she claims to remember absolutely nothing about the filming.

Steven Keaton in the television show Family Ties made him famous in 1982.

Following that, she went on to appear in a number of minor parts, most of which were uncredited, in films such as 28 Days and television programs such as True Blood and Breaking Bad.

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It was the first feature film to be shot in the region since the 1958 Frank Sinatra picture Some Came Running was shot there in 1958.

Swiss Wine Festival, where the fair scenes were recorded, is an annual event. After realizing that no local facilities were large enough to accommodate a camera, the filmmakers set up shop in a bowling alley to capture the scene when Sooner is bathed.

Home video

The videocassette or DVD version of this film has never been officially published.

Reception

‘A soft, sad, and polished production with small town warmth,’ said Julia Inman of the Indianapolis Star of the film, which she described as “a lovely, poignant, and polished production with small town friendliness that doesn’t happen very often on television.” “It’s a very sensitive narrative with an abundance of human values,” observed Bob Williams of the New York Post in his article.

References

  1. The Independent, Long Beach California, “Sooner Arrives Later Than expected”, June 18, 1975
  2. The Courier News, Blytheville, Arkansas, June 22, 1974, “A Girl Named Sooner”, page 4
  3. The Independent, Long Beach California, “Sooner Arrives Later Than expected”, June 18, 1975
  4. The High Point Enterprise, High Point North Carolina, “A Girl Named Sooner is Encore Presentation”, April 24, 1976
  5. The Independent, Long Beach California, “Sooner Arrives Later Than expected (27 June 1975). The Albuquerque Journal (Associated Press story), p. 15
  6. The Facts, Clute, Texas, “There Will Be No Video Release for ‘A Girl Named Sooner,'” December 7, 1997
  7. The High Point Enterprise, High Point, North Carolina, “A Girl Named Sooner is Encore Presentation,” April 24, 1976
  8. The Facts, Clute

External links

  • A Girl Named Soonerat the Internet Movie Database
  • A Girl Named Soonerat the TCM Movie Database
  • A Girl Named Soonerat AllMovie
  • Susan Deeron at the Internet Movie Database Taber Crosson, courtesy of the Internet Movie Database A Girl Named Sooneron, according to the Internet Movie Database YouTube

Homeowner Discovers Hidden Room Below Basement That Could Be Part of Underground Railroad

— – — – — – — – — – — – — – — – — – — – — – — – — – — – — – — – — – — – — – — – — – — – — – — – — – — – — – — – Originally from Lansdowne, Pennsylvania, Alexandra Poulos was always aware that her home held a unique significance. And now it appears that her concerns were correct. Poulos believes she has stumbled onto a piece of actual American history: a secret room beneath her basement that was previously a stop on the Underground Railroad, according to her. “This is such a strange, bizarre narrative,” Poulos, 43, said of the origin of her cherished white colonial-style home, which she describes as “weird and quirky.” As a youngster, I used to have strange nightmares about their being extra rooms in the house, which I later realized were false.

“It’s the house where I grew up.

“It’s simply so beautiful to me.

According to her, “first it was the oil tank that failed, and then it was an old cast-iron sewage pipe that just started splitting, so I had to get it replaced.” Jerry then contacted me and said, ‘Alex, you must come to the house immediately because there are cracks in the walls.'” I always react as soon as possible because I strive to preserve the house in the condition that I would like it to be in since I still adore it.” Despite the fact that she was still thinking about the basement, she recalled hearing about it from a previous neighbor some years before.

  • A neighbor out back, an old doctor and his wife, Poulos recalled.
  • To cut a long tale short, I had that thought in the back of my mind all the while.
  • ‘It was, like, 2 a.m.
  • And that’s when I realized what I needed to do.
  • After calling Baldwin Masonry to make sure the gaps in her basement were repaired properly, Poulos had an unusual inquiry for them to respond to.
  • “And I was well aware that he thought I was a complete crazy.
  • “I receive a phone call from someone who says, ‘You’re not going to believe this.’ ‘They tracked it down,'” Poulos added.
  • “I answered, ‘You’re joking,’ and he laughed.
  • It’s a whole other part of the house.” “It’s really strange because I believe what we discovered may have occurred prior to the construction of the house,” said Jerry Sanders, Poulos’ renter.
  • Despite this, Poulos has refrained from digging too far into what’s beyond the wall for fear of compromising the foundation.

Rachel Moloshok, the managing editor of publications for the Historical Society of Pennsylvania, explained that “the region in general historically has been known as an abolitionist sympathizer area that probably did have a good number of people who have been involved in or were sympathetic to anti-slavery activism, including potential participation in the Underground Railroad.” In her opinion, the only way to truly follow up on it would be to study who the previous owners were and follow up on property records to see if there were any persons who were known to be loud abolitionists, based on the actual evidence of that.

“After that, you may draw conclusions.” Moloshok speculated that the area may have been used for storage, or that someone may have had a family secret to keep hidden, or that “someone was neurotic and concealing gold.” However, Poulos is ecstatic by her enigmatically discovered new finding.

“It has Jerry completely fascinated. They’re just as enthralled by this as I am by it. ‘I’ve knew this house is unique since the first time I went through the door,’ Jerry explained. The feeling is similar to a spirit saying, “Don’t leave me.”

The Baldwin sisters on The Waltons died almost exactly two years apart

On The Waltons, Mamie and Emily Baldwin were responsible for many memorable scenes. They added a whimsical, yet sophisticated, element to the performance. The Baldwins lived close and were always willing to drop in with a warm grin, even if it wasn’t the most convenient time for the Waltonfamily to receive them. Although the sisters extolled the advantages of their father’s “recipe,” it was clear that the dish included a lot more alcohol than they were letting on. Emily Baldwin had a longing for her long-lost love, Ashley Longworth, and hoped that he would come back to her one day.

Despite being hilarious and lovable at the same time, they managed to be smart as well.

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Kleeb and Jackson had a lot in common with the characters they portrayed, much like the sisters they played. Neither of them was born until the first decade of the twentieth century. Even though the Great Depression struck just as they were starting their careers in the entertainment industry, they persevered and finally made it to Hollywood. Mary Jackson has guest starred on a variety of sitcoms prior to The Waltons. She appeared in three films: My Three Sons, The Fugitive, and The Invaders.

  • Helen Kleeb portrays Mattie Glover in the episode “Jess-Belle” of The Twilight Zone.
  • The episode was written by none other than Earl Hamner, Jr., who would go on to develop The Waltons a decade later!
  • For the television movies A Walton Wedding (1995) and A Walton Easter (1996), they resumed their roles as the Baldwin sisters (1997).
  • Mary Jackson died in December 2005, just a few days after her 95th birthday, two years after she was born.

Watch The Waltons on MeTV!

*Available in the majority of MeTV territories

Cléo from 5 to 7 movie review (1962)

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Roger Ebert

Roger Ebert was the film critic for the Chicago Sun-Times from 1967 until his death in 2013. He was born in Chicago and raised there. In 1975, he was awarded the Pulitzer Prize for outstanding criticism for his work on The New Yorker.

Cléo from 5 to 7 (1962)

From 1967 until his death in 2013, Roger Ebert worked as the film critic for the Chicago Sun-Times. In 1975, he was awarded the Pulitzer Prize for outstanding criticism for his work on The New York Times.

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