Categories Moonshine

Where Did The Term Moonshine Come From? (TOP 5 Tips)

The term “moonshine” comes from the fact that illegal spirits were made under the light of the moon. In every part of America, early moonshiners worked their stills at night to avoid detection from authorities. The United States started taxing liquors and spirits shortly after the American Revolution.

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Where did moonshine originate from?

The term moonshine has been around since the late 15th century, but it was first used to refer to liquor in the 18th century in England. The American roots of the practice (and of modern American whiskey production in general) have their origins in frontier life in Pennsylvania and other grain-producing states.

What was moonshine originally called?

Moonshine historically referred to ” clear, unaged whiskey”, once made with barley in Scotland and Ireland or corn mash in the United States, though sugar became just as common in illicit liquor during the last century.

Who made the first moonshine in America?

4. America’s first legal moonshine distillery was launched in 2005. Piedmont Distillers, located in Madison, North Carolina, holds the title of being the first legal moonshine operation in the United States and their state’s first legal distillery since Prohibition.

Who started making moonshine?

The practice of creating moonshine began in England in the 18th century and quickly spread to the US. For the first 200 years of its consumption in America, it was not illegal to produce moonshine, and issues surrounding the taxation of moonshine played a role in the American Revolution and Civil War.

Why is moonshine called white lightning?

White lightning, a white whiskey made surreptitiously and illegally, was once produced in great quantities in South Carolina. It got its name from its color and the kick it delivers when consumed.

Why is moonshine so illegal?

So why is moonshine still illegal? Because the liquor is worth more to the government than beer or wine. Today, federal rules say a household with two adults can brew up to 200 gallons of wine and the same amount of beer each year. (A few states have their own laws prohibiting the practice.)

Is moonshine called moonshine?

Moonshine is also referred by other alternative names although the commonly used word is the moonshine itself.

What state is known for moonshine?

The liquor has seen a popular, albeit legal, resurgence, but its roots are found in the mountains of Georgia, North Carolina, and Tennessee. The liquor has seen a popular, albeit legal, resurgence, but its roots are found in the mountains of Georgia, North Carolina, and Tennessee as well as West Virginia and Kentucky.

What liquor did America invent?

It is illegal to make liquor in Bourbon County. But yes: Bourbon—whiskey made from corn, aged in new oak barrels—is an American invention and it has to be made right here in America.

What is moonshine slang for?

Moonshine is the glowing light that comes from the moon, and it’s also a common term meaning ” homemade liquor.” In an old-timey bluegrass song, a character might drink moonshine in the moonshine.

Is Everclear moonshine?

Both Everclear and Moonshine are unaged spirits; however, Everclear is made from grain and Moonshine from corn. Everclear is a brand name of a neutral-tasting, very potent grain alcohol. Moonshine is a general term used to describe illegally produced corn whiskey.

What is the proof of illegal moonshine?

That’s because alcohol begins to attract moisture from the air at concentrations higher than 96% ABV, immediately diluting your moonshine. It’s worth noting that in most parts of the United States, it is illegal to distill moonshine above 160 proof (80% ABV) and it cannot be bottled at more than 125 proof (62.5% ABV).

What is the moonshine capital of the world?

Local History: Franklin County, Virginia – The Moonshine Capital of the World.

Is moonshine an American?

Most certainly, moonshine is not an American invention. Moonshine is most accurately defined as a “distilled spirit made illegally.” Like any liquor, moonshine is made by first producing a fermented beverage (a beer or wine).

Where does Methanol come from in moonshine?

Methanol is a common contaminant of moonshine, which is typically made from fermenting a “mash” of corn, sugar, and yeast for a few days and then distilling the mixture. During the fermentation process, the enzymes in the yeast convert the sugar into energy for the cell.

Why Is Moonshine Called Moonshine

1. Made in Memphis with a cigarette in hand Due to technical difficulties, this video cannot be played at the moment. November 28th, 2017 at 42 minutes and sixteen seconds. Even though the 405 travels to Memphis, drivers must contend with wet and slippery asphalt roads in order to reach their destination. When their strategy to keep together goes apart, they struggle to set up the appropriate races, and it appears like Memphis may be able to get the better of them this time around. Go for the jugular with this one.

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On the other hand, when Doc tries to put off racing Reaper until the next night, havoc ensues.

Is the new up to be found on the bottom?

  1. 12th of December, 2017 42min16 seconds plus In order to race everyone he missed on his way to the top, Chief decides to drop down the list, while Ryan and Chuck are having trouble getting ready.
  2. Bad Beets are number four.
  3. on the 19th of December, 2017 at 42 minutes and 16 seconds Chuck takes over as race master while Chief is out of town, but he still has to protect his position as the number one runner in the world.
  4. Afterwards, Monza and Dave make their way into the top five, with Ryan attempting to usurp Chuck’s position as the overall winner.
  5. 5.
  6. The Oklahoma City group gives it everything they’ve got in order to earn the $100,000 prize money.
  7. 6) Modifications to the Rules Due to technical difficulties, this video cannot be played at the moment.

Once again, a new number one is preparing to defend his position at the top of the rankings.

7.

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While Chief continues to adjust the regulations, Ryan and Chuck battle it out at the top of the leaderboard on race day.

Armageddon in the Outlaw World Due to technical difficulties, this video cannot be played at the moment.

9th and final point: Due to technical difficulties, this video cannot be played at the moment.

Kamikaze is having trouble getting to race night, and Jeff Lutz and Dominator have prepared to go head-to-head in an effort get back on the list of competitors.

Armageddon till the end of the world.

Feb.

Defending their home track is essential for the remaining 405 riders, who cannot afford to be defeated on their home soil.

Daily BattlesUnfortunately, this video is not accessible at the present time.

In the meanwhile, Chief competes in the AZN, and Doc and Chuck finally get to meet for the first time.

On February 13th, 2018, at 42 minutes and 16 seconds, plus As the season comes to a close, Farmtruck and AZN prepare for the final two list races of the year by going fishing.

What is the source of these regulations?

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Everybody is looking to make a move up the list as the season’s final list race approaches.

When Doc refuses to take a call, chaos ensues.

22:00:16+ on February 22nd, 2018 Motor Mega Week is almost approaching, which means a sneak peak at all of the action is in order right now.

Starting Your Engines is Number One.

On February 27th, 2018, at 41 minutes and 16 seconds, plus Kyle Busch, the reigning NASCAR champion, will start the second Mega Race.

Building Mega Race Gear 1 is number sixteen on the list.

On February 27th, 2018, at 43 minutes and 16 seconds, plus After losing to the 405 in the last Mega Race, Richard Rawlings is looking for a rematch, and he’s targeting current No.

Farmtruck and AZN have also been invited to participate in a race by the Misfit Garage crew.

On the 2nd of March, 2018, 42 minutes and 16 seconds, plus Despite the fact that the weather hinders them from conducting testing, the Gas Monkeys continue to work to guarantee that the chassis will allow the car to travel straight, However, there are several difficulties that Ryan and his crew must overcome when they go to Tucson, Arizona, to test the automobile in the warmer heat of Arizona.

  1. Mega Race Gear 3 Construction (Building Instructions)This video is not available at the time of publication.
  2. The Misfits begin their construction, but tensions quickly rise, threatening to put the project on hold altogether if not addressed immediately.
  3. 19.
  4. On the 2nd of March, 2018, 42 minutes and 16 seconds, plus Farmers, AZN, and the Misfits finish their construction and hit several test targets, but they are plagued by technological problems.
  5. Twenty-first, The FireballThis video is not available at the moment.
  6. He travels to the west coast to put his theories to the test, but it appears that everything is going to go horribly wrong.
  7. Putting a monorail vehicle on wheels, as envisioned by Farmtruck, proved to be the most difficult issue they have faced to far.

2018-04-06 04:16:00+00:00 A detailed analysis of Mega Race 2 helps Farmtruck and AZN prepare for the event.

Mega Race 2 is the twenty-third installment.

2018-03-06 05:00 – 16:30 It’s finally time for Mega Race 2, which means that the racers from Street Outlaws, Fast N Loud, and Misfit Garage have all gathered in Arizona for the big event.

Texas, and these two teams are prepared to go to any length to get victory.

8th of March, 2018 42min16 seconds plus In Memphis, thirty-two of the top racers from all over the United States will fight for $50,000 in prize money and the opportunity to gain points in the No Prep Kings championship series.

Memphis Money is number 25 on the list.

8th of March, 2018 42min16 seconds plus No Prep Kings Invitational is down to its last sixteen competitors, and as they enter round two, it’s time to crank up the intensity. The racers push their vehicles even further on the circuit in order to be in the running for the $50,000 prize money.

British Beginnings

The term “moonshining” originated in Britain, where the word “moonshine” was often employed. Originally, this verb referred to any action that took place throughout the night, but when it entered the United States, the meaning of the word changed.

Hard times

Moonshiners began manufacturing their alcoholic beverages illegally at the time that the United States put a high tax on high-distilled spirits produced by its residents in order to pay the Civil War. The whiskey was not created just for recreational purposes, but also to provide food for families. Obtaining more revenue was advantageous at the time due to the difficult economic climate. Paying hefty taxes meant that they had less cash to spend on their families’ food. Those who worked as moonshiners were also hardworking farmers, and this was unacceptable for them.

As a result, they continued to manufacture their alcohol illegally in order to escape the high taxes that they were compelled to pay.

Operations in the Backwoods

The moonshiners proceeded to conduct their operations in the depths of the backwoods, where it would be difficult to detect them in order to escape being apprehended by the police. The only source of light available to them because they were working late into the night to make their whiskey was the moonlight. Hence, moonshine became the term for the spirit.

Is Moonshine Just Whiskey Made of Corn?

As a precaution against being apprehended by authorities, the moonshiners began to conduct their operations deep in the woods, where it was difficult to detect them. It was just the moonlight that they could use for illumination because they were making their booze so late at night. Hence, moonshine came to be known as what it is.

Is There Moonshine That Is Legal?

The United States government approved spirit distillation for a small number of designated distillers in certain places, allowing them to produce and sell moonshine lawfully. Then there’s the great question: is the legalized alcohol still referred to as moonshine, despite the fact that the word moonshine is used to refer to alcohol that has been unlawfully distilled? Although the moonshine seen in shops has been legalized, the processes and formulas used in distilling the illicit moonshine have remained the same, resulting in the same product with the same experience, and therefore the word “moonshine” has been retained.

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What Else Is Moonshine Called?

Moonshine is referred to by a variety of different names in addition to the word “moonshine,” which is the most often used term. A short sampling of names that you may have heard previously is presented below. Check to see if you can identify any of them:

  • Alley bourbon
  • White lighting
  • Bush whiskey
  • Donkey punch
  • Skull cracker
  • Wild cat
  • Mountain dew
  • Hooch
  • A few examples include: the cold water, the branch water, the jet fuel, the mule kick (also known as the cat daddy), the rotgut (also known as the rotgut), the pop skull (also known as the pop skull), the white dog (also known as the hillbilly pop), and many others.

A Brief History of Moonshine

Finding and drinking moonshine is considered a rite of passage in the Southern United States. With its rebellious past and deadly image, moonshine has secured a position in popular culture as a result of its presence in the country’s history. When it comes to whiskey or other powerful alcoholic beverages that are created and sold illegally, moonshine is defined by the Oxford English Dictionary as follows: As a result of this classification, it may be perplexing to walk into a liquor store (or Costco) and see drink that has been classified as moonshine.

  • Unlike whiskey, which must be prepared from grain, distilled and bottled at a specific alcohol concentration, and matured in oak barrels,’shine does not have a comparable product in the marketplace.
  • There is no upper limit to the amount of alcohol in this drink, unlike vodka.
  • As a result, despite what you might have read in the Oxford English Dictionary, legally produced booze called “moonshine” can be found all over the world.
  • The word moonshine has been in use since the late 15th century, but it was only in the 18th century that it was first used to refer to alcoholic beverages in England.
  • When grain mills were operating at the time, farmers who had extra produce would distill it in order to keep it from spoiling.
  • The “whiskey tax,” as it was known at the time, was imposed by the federal government on liquor produced within the country in 1791.
  • marshal to Pennsylvania to collect the taxes owed.

Their leader was assassinated, which sparked a massive demonstration that drew approximately 6000 people.

There is a lot of truth to the folklore and legends around moonshine.

Despite the fact that some moonshiners say that these stories were published in an effort to discredit their work, legitimate producers are of the opposite opinion.

Don’t make the mistake of conflating moonshiners with bootleggers.

The termbootlegger originally referred to the practice of concealing flasks in the boot tops of automobiles in the 1880s, but with the development of automobiles, it came to apply to anybody who smuggled alcoholic beverages.

During their time spent evading the cops, these whiskey runners picked up some serious driving talents.

NASCAR and moonshiners were so intertwined, in fact, that a moonshiner provided seed money to Bill France, the organization’s founder.

After inheriting the fortune of his father, who was an infamous moonshiner, this former driver and NASCAR team owner recently teamed up with a North Carolina distillery to create “Midnight Moon.” No matter what you choose to call it—moonshine, white lightning, firewater, skullpop, mountain dew, or just moonshine—its rebellious past and controversial present make it a terrible drink.

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5 Things You Didn’t Know About Moonshine’s History

Moonshine has a rich history that is as diverse as the many different forms of the spirit itself. The majority of people are aware of the infamous side of the country’s history, yet this uniquely American spirit has many attributes that should be honored today. Do you still not believe us? Here are five interesting facts about this specialized spirit that you probably didn’t know.

1. Not all moonshine is illegal, nor is it dangerous.

Moonshiners have always produced their own booze in order to circumvent compliance with laws, taxes, and regulations. Bad batches or poor manufacturing procedures (such as distilling in vehicle radiators) might result in a product containing high levels of potentially hazardous substances, such as methanol, if there were no FDA inspectors present to guarantee that safety and quality criteria were fulfilled. Consuming methanol can cause the blood to become acidic, which can result in blindness, convulsions, and even death.

If their booze was substandard, or if people became ill or died as a result of drinking it, the moonshiner responsible would be forced out of business.

Because the Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau (TTB) does not have an official definition for moonshine, it is often classified as a “other” or “specialty spirit” under the categorization “other spirits.” According to Colin Blake, Moonshine University’s Director of Spirits Education, “Moonshine continues to be the Wild West of spirits, but not for legal reasons.” As opposed to other spirits, legally manufactured moonshine can be prepared from any source material, at any proof, with any coloring or flavoring added — the whole shebang.

There are no guidelines regarding how it should be classified.” In other words, the “moonshine” name that we see on a variety of spirits today is a movable feast.

In other words, the moonshine you buy at your local liquor shop is legal and safe for use under reasonable conditions.

2. A triple X once indicated a moonshine’s quality.

You might recall seeing allusions to moonshine in a jug with the letter XXX in it throughout popular culture. Due to the fact that these Xs were formerly used to denote how many times a batch of moonshine had been put through the still in typical DIY fashion, Prior to the invention of current distillation processes and equipment, moonshiners were required to execute three runs in order to get a higher, purer alcohol level – typically much above 80 percent ABV. A batch of beer ended up in a jug labeled with three double X’s by the time it was truly completed.

Although early moonshine was made illegally, this does not imply that the distillers were unconcerned with the quality of the product they were producing.

That emotion continues on in many current (and now legally created) moonshines that are consumed today, and it will be indelibly etched in the annals of moonshine history for generations to come.

3. Moonshine inspired NASCAR.

For the avoidance of doubt, moonshiners produce the whiskey while bootleggers carry it. The name “bootlegger” was used in the 1880s to describe smugglers who would conceal flasks in the tips of their boots. Of course, as automobiles entered the scene, the term’s definition was broadened to include anybody involved in smuggling booze. As troops returned home from World War II, equipped with new mechanical abilities, they immediately found work as bootleggers in their own areas. Modifying automobiles allowed these modern bootleggers to increase the amount of moonshine they could carry while also gaining the driving abilities essential to escape the authorities.

More than just a source of bragging rights, this rite laid the groundwork for the modern-day NASCAR.

To this day, the official spirit of NASCAR is produced at the moonshine-based distillerySugarlands Distilling Co.

There, they manufacture ” Sugarlands Shine ” in a range of unique tastes ranging from old fashioned lemonade and blueberry muffin to maple bacon, root beer, and peanut butter and jelly.

4. America’s first legal moonshine distillery was launched in 2005.

An explanation is in order: moonshiners produce the booze, while bootleggers carry it. “Bootlegger” is an expression that dates back to the 1880s and describes people who thieved and hid contraband in their boots. When automobiles entered the scene, its connotation was naturally broadened to encompass everyone involved in the smuggling of booze or contraband cigarettes. Armed with new mechanical abilities acquired during World War II, troops went home and immediately found work as bootleggers in their home towns and cities..

When they had spare time, these bootleggers would compete against one another in races to see who had the best talents.

Big Bill France, the group’s founder and a former bootlegger, received the funds to launch the organization, which was naturally funded by a mooshiner..

Sugarlands launched their Gatlinburg, Tennessee, operation following a visit to Moonshine University.

5. Mountain Dew was originally created as a chaser for whiskey.

The brilliant yellow beverage you’re undoubtedly familiar with was called after a slang phrase for mountain-brewed moonshine, which you may not have realized at the time of its introduction. Yes, you are correct. In Knoxville, Tennessee, in 1932, brothers Barney and Ally Hartman invented the lemon-lime cocktail as a whiskey chaser for their friends. In accordance with the Smithsonian Institution, the name “Mountain Dew” was chosen to stress the intended usage of their beverage, which was emphasized further by the existence of the original brand mascot, “Willy the Hillbilly,” and his slogan, “It’ll tickle yore innards.” As a result of PepsiCo’s acquisition of Mountain Dew in 1964, distribution was increased beyond Tennessee and throughout the rest of the United States.

  • Although the brand’s link with moonshine has developed since then, its legacy is still alive and well.
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Why is Moonshine called “Moonshine”?

The brilliant yellow beverage you’re undoubtedly familiar with was called after a slang phrase for mountain-brewed moonshine, which you may not have realized at the time you first tried it. Yes, you are correct. Barney and Ally Hartman, brothers from Knoxville, Tennessee, invented the lemon-lime cocktail in 1932 to use as a whiskey chaser. It was decided to use the name “Mountain Dew” to underline the intended usage of the drink, which was reinforced by the employment of the original brand’s mascot, “Willy the Hillbilly,” and his slogan, “It’ll tickle yore innards,” according to the Smithsonian.

Since then, the brand’s link with moonshine has grown and diversified, but its legacy is still alive and well today.

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From Britain to America

The term “moonshining” comes from the United Kingdom, where it was used as a verb to describe moonshining. At initially, moonshining was simply defined as engaging in any activity or performing any labor that was performed late at night. However, when the name made its way to the United States, it took on a whole other connotation.

Times Were Tough

When the United States imposed a disproportionately high distilled spirits tax on the sale of whiskey produced by its residents, in part to pay the Civil War, moonshiners began manufacturing their alcoholic beverages illegally to supplement their income. They weren’t creating whiskey as a recreational activity; rather, they were making it to provide for their families. It was a difficult time back then, and any little bit of extra revenue was appreciated. If they agree to pay the high tax on the sale of their products, they may find themselves with insufficient funds to put food on the table and provide for their family.

A situation like this was just untenable for the hard-working farmers who had turned to moonshining. They needed to be able to retain every cent they earned. As a result, they continued to manufacture their booze in secret in order to avoid paying any taxes to the federal government.

Backwoods Operations

In order to avoid detection by the police and avoid being apprehended, they began performing their activities deep in the woods, where they would be difficult to track down. After midnight, in complete darkness with only the light of the moon to guide them, they went about their business distilling alcohol. As a result, the name “moonshine” came to be linked exclusively with the illicit alcohol that these moonshiners produced.

Just Corn Whiskey?

When you think of moonshine, you probably think of a clear, unaged whiskey created from corn mash, which is what most people think of. You’d be basically true, but the word is also commonly used to refer to any alcoholic beverage that has been unlawfully produced. During the Prohibition period, there was a high demand for alcoholic beverages, which led to a glut of moonshiners. As a result, in order to produce a lower-cost product and generate more revenue from their sales, they began producing batches of alcohol using white sugar instead of corn mash, which was technically rum rather than whiskey.

However, because all of this alcoholic beverage was produced illegally, late at night, and under the light of the moon, it was collectively referred to as moonshine.

Can There Be Such a Thing as Legal Moonshine?

Select distilleries in specified locations were granted permission to lawfully make and sell’shine when the United States loosened its distilled spirits restrictions a few years back. But, if moonshine is a phrase that refers to any form of alcoholic beverage that is illegally produced and marketed, can it still go by the well-known name? Despite the fact that the “moonshine” sold in shops is legal, the formulas used to create it are the same as those that were previously employed in illicit distillation operations.

Alternate Names

When the United States loosened its distilled alcohol rules a few years ago, the government made it lawful for chosen distilleries in designated locations to legally make and sell booze. Does it still have the right to use the well-known name, though, if moonshine is a phrase that refers to any form of unlawfully produced and supplied alcohol? Despite the fact that the “moonshine” sold in stores is legal, the formulas used to create it are the same as those that were previously utilized for illicit distillation.

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Why is Moonshine Called Moonshine?

“Why is such and such named X, Y, or Z?” is a question that everyone will ask at some point in their lives, and most likely multiple times throughout. Some of the answers are rather simple, such is the fact that pizza is the Italian word for pie.

Other times, the solution isn’t that straightforward. As an illustration, consider the phrase moonshine. It’s possible that the origin and meaning of the phrase are not what you expect, or even what you believe you might know.

England Circa 18th Century

The name moonshineas as we know it now has its origins in England during the 18th century. Its meaning is derived from the concept of light without heat, or light emitted by the moon, respectively. It referred to illegal or smuggled alcoholic beverages. Moonshiner was a phrase used to denote anyone who engaged in unlawful activities while concealing their identities in the dark. It might refer to any number of crimes, including robbery, burglary, and grave robbing.

America Post-Revolution

Following the American Revolution, the United States began taxing alcoholic beverages and spirits in order to assist pay off the debts incurred during the war. Corn had a poor monetary worth, but it had the potential to be transformed into a highly valuable whiskey. In response to these additional levies, tensions erupted into the Whiskey Rebellion, which resulted in the deployment of 13,000 soldiers to Pennsylvania. Jefferson, on the other hand, revoked the tax in 1801. However, this was not a long-lasting effect.

Once prohibition was lifted, moonshiners were able to earn a substantial amount of money from their clandestine moonshine operations conducted under the cover of darkness.

Although Mountain Dew is not included in this list, it should be since few people are aware that it was originally slang for moonshine long before it was renowned as a neon drink.

How Moonshine Works

There needs to be a compelling reason for going through all of the bother of manufacturing moonshine in the first place. Several factors contributed to this, but they all boil down to one thing: government control of the alcoholic beverage industry. Moonshining was practiced very early in the history of the United States. A short time after the Revolution, the United States found itself in the difficult position of having to pay for the costs of fighting a protracted war. The answer was to impose a federal tax on alcoholic beverages and spirits.

  • As a result, they decided to just continue creating their own whisky while fully disregarding the government tax.
  • It was possible for farmers to survive a difficult year by distilling their maize into lucrative whiskey, and the additional revenue made a tough frontier living practically tolerable.
  • When federal agents (known as ” Revenuers “) came around to collect the tax, they were assaulted, and some were tarred and feathered, according to the report.
  • President George Washington convened an assembly of militiamen under federal authority at the request of the president.
  • In the case of the Whisky Rebellion, it was the first significant test of federal power for the newly formed federal government.
  • Because excise duties on alcoholic beverages did not disappear, moonshiners continued to have an incentive to operate outside the law.
  • As the government attempted to collect the excise tax in order to support the Civil War, the intensity of these fights increased in the 1860s.

The moonshiners’ tactics became increasingly desperate and vicious as time went on, frightening residents who might be able to provide information about the locations of stills and attacking IRS inspectors and their families.

As the United States entered the twentieth century, the temperance movement, which aimed to prohibit the use of alcoholic beverages, gained momentum.

In 1920, Prohibition became law in the United States.

All of a sudden, there was no legal alcoholic beverage accessible.

Moonshiners were unable to keep up with demand, resulting in the production of cheaper, sugar-based moonshine as well as watered-down moonshine as a result.

Asspeakeasies became built in every city as organized crime flourished – these secret saloons were equipped with concealed doors, passwords, and escape routes in the event that the “Feds” arrived there to perform a raid.

Although moonshine remained to be a concern for federal authorities throughout the 1960s and 1970s, today’s courts handle only a small number of cases involving unlawful alcoholic beverages.

As a result, while several counties in the southern and midwestern United States remained “dry” (i.e., alcohol-free) for decades following the end of national Prohibition, even those localized liquor laws have mostly been abolished.

One of the primary reasons for the existence of moonshining is the desire to defy the authority of the federal government.

Tim Smith Moonshine – History of Shine

Moonshine is a general term that refers to any type of alcoholic beverage that is produced in secret in order to evade excessive taxes or prohibitions on alcoholic beverages. The word “moonshine” was coined in the United Kingdom. When it was first coined, the term “moonshining” referred to any action that was carried out in the dark of the night by the light of the moon. Moonshine is made from a few simple ingredients: maize meal, sugar, yeast, and water. The formula for whiskey is quite similar to that of rum.

When you buy a bottle of whiskey off the shelf at your local liquor shop, it has been matured for years in charred oak barrels, which gives it its amber color and mellow flavor profile.

Due to the fact that it is bottled and sold directly from the still, it is clear and has a stronger kick.

This moonshine will have a tinted look as a result of the fruit that has been used in its preparation.

Moonshiners, Bootleggers, and Rumrunners

Operators of illicit whiskey stills performed their operations at night in order to evade discovery by law enforcement agencies; as a result, they were dubbed “Moonshiners” by the public. Bootleggers were the individuals that Moonshiners used to convey their illicit alcoholic beverages to their customers. The word “bootlegger” stems from colonial times when smugglers traveled on horseback with their alcoholic beverages disguised in their tall riding boots, thus the name. During the 1930s, 1940s, and 1950s, bootleggers exchanged their horses for automobiles.

NASCAR was created as a result of this fascination with automobiles and speed.

Rumrunners are essentially the same as bootleggers, with the exception that they transport their contraband via the water, employing swift vessels with disguised cargo hold compartments.

How is Moonshine Made?

Fermentation and distillation are the two processes that are used in the production of alcohol. Yeast fermentation is a chemical event that takes place when sugar is broken down by the yeast. One of the byproducts of this process is alcohol. Evaporating the alcohol at 172 degrees Celsius and collecting the steam before condensing it back into liquid form is the process of distillation. The Distillation Process for Moonshine: Step-by-Step Instructions:

  • Corn meal is made by grinding it up. Most commercial hog feed is composed of maize, and it is inexpensive and easy to obtain without drawing too much notice. Corn meal is steeped in hot water in the still before being infused with other ingredients to make whiskey. Sugar is occasionally added, although traditional moonshiners use malt to convert the starch in the maize meal into sugar, which is a process that takes time. It is next necessary to add the yeast, which kick-starts the fermentation process. This combination, known as mash, is well churned before being cooked in the still for a certain period of time. When making bourbon, copper is often used for the still and all metal piping since it transmits heat effectively and does not contaminate the alcohol. A heat source is utilized to get the mash temperature up to around 172 degrees Fahrenheit. Stills have been heated using wood, coal, and even steam in the past, but today’s stills are generally heated with propane gas
  • At this point, the alcohol is completely evaporated. As the pressure in the still develops, the alcohol steam is driven via the cap arm, which is a pipe that comes out of the top of the still
  • The steam then travels into the thump keg, which is just a barrel into which the steam is forced to the bottom as the pressure in the still builds. In honor of the thumping sound generated by the steam being driven under the level of alcohol in the barrel, the thump keg was given this name. At this stage, the proof of the alcohol steam is doubled
  • The steam continues into the worm, which is a coiled piece of pipe that spirals along the interior of the worm box
  • And the steam continues into the worm. Water is poured into the top of the worm box from a nearby water source and then expelled through the bottom of the crate or barrel, which is known as a worm chamber. This keeps the worm immersed in cold water that is continually moving, which helps to condense the alcohol vapour into liquid. When the worm’s end is reached, the alcohol drains into a pail or container. A proving barrel is then used to equalize the quantity of alcohol in the moonshine and mix it to get the correct proof. The clear liquid that results from this process is ready to be packaged or jarred and sold.

American History 101: Moonshine

Corn meal is made by grinding the kernels of corn together. Most commercial hog feed is composed of maize, and it is inexpensive and easy to obtain without drawing too much notice. Corn meal is steeped in hot water in the still before being infused with other ingredients to produce whiskey. Traditional moonshiners use malt to convert the starch in the maize meal into sugar, which is sometimes added to the mixture. It is next necessary to add the yeast, which kicks off the fermenting process. It is necessary to properly stir this mixture before it is cooked in the still for a certain length of time.

  1. A heat source is utilized to get the mash temperature to around 172 degrees Fahrenheit.
  2. Pressure increases in the still, and as a result, the alcohol steam is driven through the cap arm, which is a pipe that emerges from its top.
  3. In honor of the thumping sound generated by the steam being pressed under the level of alcohol in the barrel, the thump keg was given this designation.
  4. Water is poured into the top of the worm box from a nearby water source and then expelled from the bottom of the crate or barrel, creating a worm colony.
  5. When the worm’s end is reached, the alcohol is expelled into a pail or jar.
  6. The clear liquid that results from this process is ready to be packaged or jarred and distributed.
Where Did Moonshine Come From?

Scottish and Irish immigrants brought moonshine to the Appalachian mountains, where it became popular. They passed on their distilling knowledge to their neighbors and newer generations. Farmers relied on the illicit moonshine industry to help them survive severe winters, while others used it to supplement their income. The history of moonshine is intertwined with the history of the United States. Family distilleries may never have gotten together to create a beverage that was cleaner and more quickly distilled than whiskey if it weren’t for the American Revolution and the events that followed it.

What Is Moonshine?

Moonshine is a high-proof beverage produced by distilling molasses with copper stills. Spirit purists classify the spirit as a handmade, un-aged whiskey that is distinguished by its clear hue, maize basis, and high percentage of ethanol. The alcohol concentration might reach as high as 190 proof at its highest point.

The American Journey Of Moonshine

Copper stills are used to produce moonshine, which has a high proof. Spirit purists classify the spirit as a handmade, unaged whiskey that may be distinguished by its clear hue, maize basis, and high percentage of ethanol. When the alcohol concentration reaches 190 proof, it is considered to be extremely high.

The Whiskey Rebellion

The conflict between the government and its citizenry reached a boiling point in 1794, resulting in the start of the Whiskey Rebellion. The suppression of the uprising proved to be unpopular, and it became a liability for the Federalist party in the process. The Whiskey Tax was abolished in the year 1803. This, however, did not persist for long. In order to sustain the federal government during the Civil War, a new whiskey tax was enacted. The taxes on alcoholic beverages were as much as eight times higher than the cost of the alcoholic beverages themselves.

And with the emergence of the revenuers, the moonshiners were able to re-enter the market.

Prohibition

The conflict between the government and its citizenry reached a boiling point in 1794, resulting in the start of the Whiskey Revolution. As a result, the repression of the revolt became unpopular, and the Federalist party suffered as a result. During the year 1803, the whisky tax was abolished. This, however, did not endure for lengthy periods of time. To sustain the federal government during the Civil War, a new whiskey tax was enacted. In other cases, the taxes on alcoholic beverages were up to eight times greater than their actual cost.

Department of Treasury.

How Moonshine Got Its Name

The friction between the government and its citizenry reached boiling point in 1794, resulting in the start of the Whiskey Rebellion. The repression of the insurrection proved to be unpopular, and the Federalist party suffered as a result. In 1803, the whiskey tax was abolished. This, however, did not endure long. As a result of the Civil War, a new whiskey tax was implemented to help pay the federal government. The taxes on alcoholic beverages were as much as eight times higher than the price of the alcoholic beverages themselves.

Tax collectors were turned into police officers by the Revenue Bureau of the Treasury Department. And with the emergence of the revenuers, the moonshiners were able to reopen their doors.

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The conflict between the government and its inhabitants reached a boiling point, and the Whiskey Rebellion erupted in 1794. The crushing of the uprising proved to be unpopular, and it became a liability for the Federalist party. The whiskey tax was abolished in 1803. However, this did not endure for long. The Civil War prompted the imposition of a new whiskey tax in order to sustain the federal government. In other cases, taxes were up to eight times greater than the cost of alcoholic beverages themselves.

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And with the emergence of the revenuers, the moonshiners were able to reopen for business.

Bootleggers and Nascar

Moonshine distillers couldn’t accomplish it all on their own. It was also required that drivers be hired to deliver the booze around the country. “Bootleggers” and “runners” were the terms used to describe drivers who conveyed alcoholic drinks. They sneaked the items across the United States in automobiles that had been specially modified to increase their speed and load capacity. Engines and heavy-duty shock absorbers were installed in the automobiles to accommodate the additional weight. When they weren’t “working,” the bootleggers would compete against one another in races.

Big Bill France, a bootlegger, was the inspiration behind the group.

Legalize It

In 2005, the Piedmont Distilleries in North Carolina produced the first batch of legal moonshine in the United States. They began by selling fruit-infused moonshine in the hopes of restoring the reputation of moonshine. Other distilleries around the United States quickly followed suit. Moonshine distilling is no longer only an American tradition; it has spread around the world, with distilleries also operating in Scotland and Russia. Several other nations, such as Albania, produce an alcoholic beverage known asraki, which is similar to moonshine but is prepared from a variety of fruits rather than maize.

Good Ol’ American Past Time

Moonshine is referred to by a variety of names. The liquor’s nicknames, which are known by a variety of euphemisms, are a great pick-me-up for a terrible day. To put a spring in your step, you don’t even need to drink anything at all. Hooch, homebrew, firewater, and rotgut are just a handful of the alcoholic beverages available. Mountain Dew is a lemon-lime soft drink that was invented by the brothers Barney and Ally Hartman in Knoxville, Tennessee, and is widely known across the world. Despite the fact that it was intended to be a whiskey chaser, the name was a homage to another moonshine monicker.

Moonshine is as American as baseball and apple pie, and it has been and continues to be made and marketed illegally in the United States.

The majority of those who still produce moonshine without a license do so to either avoid paying the alcohol tax or to satisfy a nostalgic need.

Pick up a mason jar or jug of moonshine from your local liquor store to start your project. It is available in a variety of tastes, and it is preferable if the product is clear. When you drink a jar of moonshine, you’re drinking a glass of American history.

What is Moonshine?

Various names have been given to moonshine. There are various nicknames for the booze, all of which are intended to brighten a gloomy day. If you want to put a spring in your step, you don’t even need the drink. Just a few examples include: booze, homebrewing, firewater, and rotgut. Mountain Dew is a lemon-lime soft drink that was invented by the Hartman brothers in Knoxville, Tennessee, and is well-known across the world. However, although it was intended to be used as an after-dinner drink, the name was a homage to another moonshine term.

Moonshine was and continues to be illegally made and sold in the United States, just like baseball and apple pie.

People who produce moonshine nowadays without a license are mostly doing so to get around the alcohol tax or to relive their childhood memories.

It is available in a variety of tastes, and it is preferable if the product is transparent in appearance.

Moonshine’s Not Just a Southern Thing

The following image is courtesy of Zenith Press. While moonshine is strongly ingrained in Southern culture and tradition, its origins may really be traced back to the United States state of Pennsylvania. When the federal government enacted the distilled-spirits tax in 1791, farmer-distillers in the western section of the state took to the streets to demonstrate their displeasure. Tax collectors were tarred and feathered, and their homes were attacked with firearms. These activities provoked the Whiskey Rebellion, which almost resulted in the outbreak of America’s first civil war.

  • Vinegar Hill, a waterfront area in Brooklyn that is currently known as Vinegar Hill, used to be a hub of illegal whiskey production.
  • After conducting a pre-dawn raid, they cut up stills and confiscated whiskey, which they transported to the neighboring Brooklyn Navy Yard.
  • By the early 1900s, New York City was producing more moonshine than the whole southern United States combined.
  • As reported by the Chicago Daily Tribune, the Genna criminal family had imported Italian laborers “to brew moonshine” into the United States.

According to a report in the New York Times, moonshine is being produced in San Francisco, Oregon, and Washington State.

Women Made Moonshine, Too.

The Library of Congress is a federal government institution that collects and organizes information. You can think of moonshining as more of a man’s world than anything else. Women, on the other hand, were distilling booze. “Nancy the Moonshiner” was one of the ladies that lived in this world. When she was growing up in Warren County, New Jersey, folks thought she was a bit of an oddball. What she actually was, though, was a moneymaker and a tenacious entrepreneur who worked hard to make ends meet.

  • The apples were used to manufacture Jersey lightning, also known as apple jack, which is a distilled hard apple cider.
  • She managed to get away.
  • Wazeniak was apprehended when a guy wandered home at the end of the night and then fell into a marsh, where he later died.
  • She was the first woman to be found guilty of selling poisoned liquor in the state of Illinois.
  • Willie Carter Sharpe was one of the most well-known whiskey trippers in Franklin County, Virginia, where he lived for many years.
  • Her diamond-studded teeth drew attention during her testimony in the Moonshine Conspiracy Trial in 1935, which was shown live on television.

NASCAR Really Does Have Moonshine Roots.

What exactly is contained within the cases? Of course, we’re talking about moonshine. The Library of Congress is a federal government institution that collects and organizes information. Whiskey trippers were masters of the vehicle, as no one else could match them. Many of them enjoyed competing against one another in their spare time. Lloyd Seay was one of those drivers, and he was a rising star in the world of stock car racing. He was killed by his cousin in a disagreement over moonshine in 1941, though, and his career was effectively finished.

  1. It was his mechanic, Louis Jerome “Red” Vogt, who coined the term NASCAR at a conference held in France in 1947 at Daytona Beach, where he was present (National Association of Stock Car Auto Racing).
  2. Junior Johnson, on the other hand, is perhaps NASCAR’s most well-known connection to moonshining.
  3. Johnson’s ability behind the wheel resulted in success on the racetrack for the team.
  4. After that, he drove directly home to Wilkes County, where he was arrested the next morning for starting up his father’s stills in the family’s basement.
  5. When he got out, he immediately returned to the two things he enjoyed doing the most: racing and moonshining.

Johnson was pardoned by President Ronald Reagan in 1986 after being convicted of moonshining. In 2010, the racing veteran was inducted into the NASCAR Hall of Fame as a member of the first class of honorees.

Modern-Day Moonshine

Photograph courtesy of Nan Palermo on Flickr What you’ve been hearing is correct: Back in the day, drinking moonshine might literally cause a person to go blind. The problem was caused by shady manufacturing practices. For example, some illegal distillers used lye to speed up the fermentation process in their product. Others utilized automobile radiators to create their moonshine, which can result in lead seeping into the product and building up in the body of those who consume the alcohol. The situation was so severe that, as part of its Poison Moonshine Publicity Program in the 1960s, the federal government sought the services of Louis Armstrong to record radio advertisements to raise awareness about the dangers of backwoods liquor.

  1. The brands mentioned on this page are carefully crafted on licensed still frames.
  2. Even better, one of them comes from a woman-owned distillery, one is manufactured in Brooklyn (not the South!
  3. TheDawsonville Moonshine Distilleryin Georgia produces maize whiskey using a 150-year-old formula that was passed down from a moonshiner named Simmie Free who wore overalls and worked in the distillery.
  4. Put a rural spin on Sex on the Beach by substituting Wood’s moonshine for the traditional vodka.
  5. “I prefer to drink it neat and carefully since this thing has a lot of kick to it!
  6. Flickr user DeShaun Craddock The Kings County Distillery, which is housed within the Brooklyn Navy Yard, was New York City’s first licensed distillery since the repeal of Prohibition.
  7. Prior to establishing KCD, he and his partner David Haskell ran a moonshine distillery out of their home.

The beverage has a pleasant sweetness to it, and it has a smooth texture on the tongue.

I’m aware of the situation.

However, it is moonshine that has been infused with cacao bean husks, making it taste like alcoholic liquid dark chocolate.

Midnight Moon is the product of Junior Johnson, and unlike Dawsonville or King’s County moonshines, Midnight Moon is available throughout the country, making it simple to get your hands on a bottle of the alcoholic beverage.

Try the basic taste, which comes in a Mason jar, or venture out to the Apple Pie flavor, which is an Appalachian favorite made with apple juice and cinnamon sticks and packaged in a jar.

The latter truly does taste like dessert—but with a kick—and is a fantastic treat for the upcoming cold fall evenings. There will be no rotgut here. It’s just plain old mountain dew.

The Etymology of “Moonshine”

According to legend, the term “moonshine” (unaged spirits illicitly produced “by the light of the moon”) was coined in reference to “moonrakers,” a fictitious English brandy smugglers who were supposed to have dug kegs from ponds. When they were apprehended, they claimed to be fools as they attempted to scrape cheese from the moon’s reflection. Moonshine, of course, was originally used to refer to the real light of the moon, and it first appeared in the 15th century. A metaphorical application of the phrase may be found in both poetry and prose, where it refers to “appearance without substance.” In colloquial usage since the late 18th century in reference to illegally produced spirits — primarily unaged corn-mash whiskey produced in Appalachia — the term refers to the clear color of the liquid and its smuggling into the country at night, both of which are evoked by the word’s colloquial meaning.

However, while the production of moonshine was illegal until 2010, largely because producers would distill their own spirits in order to avoid the high taxes on liquor production (and also because it has historically been produced in an unsafe manner), the term became particularly popular during the period following the passage of the 18th Amendment and the passage of the Volstead Act, which began Prohibition in 1920 and ended it in 1933, when it became especially popular.

Because of the folk story stated in the title, the moniker “Moonraker,” which is said to have spawned the phrases “moonshine” and “moonshiner,” has remained popular as a nickname for individuals from the rural English county of Wiltshire for many years.

According to the legend, the natives concealed smuggled casks of French brandy in ponds to avoid being discovered by customs inspectors (also known as revenue officers, which would influence the Appalachian term “revenooers”).

The tax collectors laughed at their presumption of ignorance and continued on their way.

The Encyclopedia of Oklahoma History and Culture

Apocryphal English brandy smugglers known as “moonrakers” were said to have raked up kegs from ponds in order to make “moonshine,” which is unaged spirits illicitly distilled “under the light of the moon.” When they were apprehended, they feigned to be fools, pretending to be trying to scrape cheese from the moon’s reflection. After originating in the 15th century, the term moonshine was used to designate to the actual light emitted by the moon. In poetry and prose, it was often used metaphorically to allude to “appearance without substance.” In colloquial usage since the late 18th century in reference to illegally produced spirits — primarily unaged corn-mash whiskey produced in Appalachia — the term refers to the clear color of the liquid and its smuggling into the country at night, both of which are evoked by the word’s colloquial use.

However, while the production of moonshine was illegal until 2010, largely because producers would distill their own spirits in order to avoid the high taxes on liquor production (and also because it has historically been produced in an unsafe manner), the term became particularly popular during the period following the passage of the 18th Amendment and the passage of the Volstead Act, which began Prohibition in 1920 and ended it in 1933, when it became particularly popular.

As a result of the traditional story referenced in the title, the moniker “Moonraker,” which is supposed to have been the inspiration for the phrases “moonshine” and “moonshiner,” has endured as a nickname for individuals from Wiltshire, a rural English county.

Folklore has it that the inhabitants concealed smuggled casks of French brandy in ponds to avoid being discovered by customs inspectors (also known as revenue officers, which influenced the Appalachian term “revenues”)…

Despite their apparent ignorance, the revenue officers chuckled and continued on their way.

Bibliography

The Second Oldest Profession: An Informal History of Moonshining in America (Jess Carr, The Second Oldest Profession: An Informal History of Moonshining in America) (Englewood Cliffs, N.J.: 1972). Born Sober: Prohibition in Oklahoma, 1907–1959 (Jimmie Lewis Franklin, Born Sober) (Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1971). Moonshine: Its History and Folklore (Esther Kellner, Moonshine: Its History and Folklore) (Indianapolis: Bobbs-Merrill Co., 1971).

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